BRITISH WARSHIPS and AUXILIARIES LOST, DAMAGED and ATTACKED by NAME

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BRITISH NAVAL VESSELS LOST, DAMAGED and ATTACKED by NAME, 1914-15, some 1916-19


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HMS Amphion, scout cruiser,  sinking on 6 August 1914 [Navy Photos/Bruce Constable, click to enlarge)

return to World War 1, 1914-1918

 


An update of the British warships and auxiliaries in the original  and uncorrected "British Vessels Lost at Sea", HMSO, 1919


August 1914 to December 1915
incomplete:
January 1916 to 1919


See also British warships and Auxiliaries Lost by Date

 Notes:

[1] Ships in BOLD capitals are those sunk or otherwise lost; in lower case bold are attacked and/or damaged. Variations in the published information are in brackets starting with the abbreviation for the source  e.g. [dx - in 58.35N, 01.56E]. Click for Notes, Abbreviations and Sources.


[2] Warship information is generally in the order - type, class, displacement tonnage, launch year, armament, speed, crew, captain if known, unit, operation if known. How sunk or damaged, lives lost [in brackets: source abbreviations starting with + or H for original HMSO]


[3] Auxiliary and hired vessel information is in the order - gross tonnage/build year, owner, registration port or place of ownership/management, crew if known, master or skipper, voyage and cargo, conditions if known. How sunk or damaged, lives lost [source abbreviations starting with + or H for original HMSO]


[4] Link to Royal Navy casualty lists


Introduction

Early on, and as much as  I appreciated the value of "British Vessels Lost at Sea, 1914-18", published by HMSO in 1919, the entries were short, and so soon after the end of the war, often inaccurate. I therefore decided to enlarge and correct the loss information using available information. The project was nearly completed some years back, with the addition of Royal Navy ships damaged, plus background information from a variety of sources, including the 2005 edition of "Royal Navy Day by Day", by Capt A B Sainsbury and Lt-Cdr F L Phillips.

Then in 2006, David Hepper's invaluable "British Warship Losses in the Ironclad Era 1860-1919" was published by Chatham Publishing. As Mr Hepper's researches encompassed the original Admiralty records [the ADM series], this meant back to the drawing board. 

Information on individual ships has not been combined, but identified in date order by [01], [02], [03] etc. To avoid repetition, many of the ships refer back to the main entry - this will include accounts of battles, raids, major sinkings etc.

For all ship losses, the researcher is recommended to consult David Hepper's, "British Warship Losses in the Ironclad Era 1860-1919" for fuller details.





He* - The main loss information has been checked with Hepper, but additional details have not been incorporated.



1. AUGUST 1914  to DECEMBER 1915


numerical

33, motor boat, 1 November 1915, SE England - Motor Patrol Boat Number 33 reported as destroyed by accidental fire whilst lying in Brightlingsea Creek. Caught fire at 12.15pm and scuttled one hour later when the fire got out of control. Identity of craft is uncertain. Dittmer & Colledge record the name Weenie for Motor Boat 33, but that vessel was carried on the Navy List until 1919 [He/D; ADM.137/168]

263, steam pinnace – see PRINCESS IRENE, minelayer, 27 May 1915, SE England


A

ABOUKIR, cruiser – see 22 September 1914, Sinking of Cruisers Aboukir, Hogue, Cressy by U.9, North Sea. Built 1900, Pendant No. N.00, Capt John Drummond. Violent explosion starboard side just before 0630, believed mined, Capt Drummond signalled other two ships to close but keep ahead, took 20° list, steadied but then began to go over rapidly, abandon ship ordered, but only one cutter could be launched, so most of crew had to go over the side, turned over just 25min after the explosion, floated bottom up and sank; 528 lives lost - 25 officers, 502 ratings and 1 canteen staff, made up of 214 regular RN, 49 RNR, 183 RFR, 2 RN Pensioners, 18 RMA, 22 RMLI, 38 RMA & RMLI Reserves and 1 Admiralty Civilian. See also HOGUE, CRESSY [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ge/ke/ty; ADM.137/47, ADM.137/2232, ADM137/2081, ADM.1/8396/356]

ACASTA, destroyer - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914

ACHERON, destroyer – see ARIEL, destroyer, 10 March 1915, North Sea

ACHILLES, cruiser, 20 November 1914, Northern British waters - Warrior-class, 13,550t, 6-9.2in/4-7.5in/26-3pdr, 2nd CS Grand Fleet, at gun practice. Lyddite shell detonated in 9.2in gun, 11 gun crew injured, all survived [Rn/Cn/D/dk/gf]

ACTAEON, Sheerness Torpedo School – see AGAMEMNON II, hired trawler, 15 July 1915, North Sea

ADAMANT, submarine depot ship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

ADJUTANT [01], patrol vessel – see FOX, light cruiser 12 January 1915, German East Africa Campaign.

ADJUTANT [02], patrol vessel, German East Africa , 6 February 1915 - ex-German tug, 231grt, built 1905, captured 10 October 1914 in East Africa by light cruiser Dartmouth, armed with 1-3pdr, took part in capture of Mafia Island 12 January, now with force blockading light cruiser Königsberg in Rufiji delta, Sub Lt Wilfred Price in command, carrying out reconnaissance of one of the entrances. Heavily shelled from the shore by German forces protecting approaches to Königsberg, steam-pipe cut, drifted ashore and recaptured; 1 ratings lost, rest of crew taken prisoner. Salvaged by the Germans, got through British naval blockade, steamed to Dar-es-Salaam, taken to pieces by railway engineers and carried by train to Kigoma, reassembled for operations on Lake Tanganyika. Hepper, possibly in error, reports that “light cruiser Pyramus later closed and destroyed her where she lay” [Rn/C/Cn/D/ap/dk/kp]

AE.1 [01] [RAN], submarine – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

AE.1 [02] [RAN], submarine, 14 September 1914, South West Pacific - E-class, 650/796t, 1913, 1-12pdr/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 15/9kts, Lt-Cdr Thomas Besant, taking part in Australian occupation of German New Guinea including Rabaul on Blanche Bay, New Britain. Destroyer Parramatta and AE.1 sent from Rabaul on the morning of the 14th to patrol E of Cape Gazelle in St George’s Channel separating New Britain from New Ireland for German ships including possibly Geier [1], Parramatta returned that evening as ordered having last seen AE.1 at 1530. [H/He/bw/dk/ke - 19th, date declared lost] – AE.1 failed to reappear at 2000, never seen again, lost cause unknown off New Britain, Bismarck Archipelago, possibly hit coral reef as she returned to Blanche Bay submerged, a prolonged search found no trace; all Australian and British crew lost, 3 officers and 32 ratings [Rn - 2 officers, 32 ratings; He – 2 officers, 16 ratings] [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/ke]

AE.2 [01] [RAN], submarine – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

AE.2 [02] [RAN], submarine - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

AE.2 [03] [RAN], submarine, 30 April 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - E-class, 655/796t, 1913, 1-12pdr/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, to Mediterranean 3/15, Lt-Cdr Henry Stoker, first Australian/British submarine to break through the Dardanelles to the Sea of Marmara reaching there on the 26th, now heading for Gulf of Atarki, SW part of Marmara to rendezvous with E.14 which had followed AE.2 in. Sighted Turkish gunboat, lost control and came to the surface only 100yds off, Sultan Hissar [French-built 38m-type torpedo boat Sultanhissar] launched torpedoes which missed, then opened fire making a number of hits, AE.2 surfaced to allow the crew to get off, then scuttled near the island of Marmara [C - hit by shore batteries]; all crew saved, 4 ratings died as POW's in 1916. Wreck believed found in 1999 at 240ft [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/ke/on/www; ADM.137/2077]

AENNE RICKMERS [01], seaplane carrier – see SWIFTSURE, battleship 5 March 1915, Turkish Coastal Operations

AENNE RICKMERS [02], seaplane carrier, 11 March 1915, Smyrna Blockade – ex-German steamship, 7,000t/4,083grt, 1911, 1-12pdr/2 seaplanes, seized at Port Said 8/14, taken over as seaplane carrier in January with minimum of modifications, under Red ensign with mixed naval/civilian crew, French aircraft with French pilots and British observers, operated off Sinai, Syrian & Turkish coasts, taking part in British naval blockade of Smyrna. Torpedoed by German-commanded, Turkish torpedo boat Demir Hisar at 0200, grounded at Mudros for shoring-up by HMS Reliance, refloated 12 May, to Alexandria for repairs, completed 18 June. Recommissioned as HMS Anne with naval crew 5 August, paid off August 1917 [Rn/C/Cn/D/bt/nw]

AFRICAN MONARCH, Admiralty collier, 6 July 1915, Barents Sea - 4,003grt, built 1898, Monarch SS Co, Glasgow-reg, Cardiff for Archangel with coal, general cargo. Mined, laid by Meteor, sank at entrance to White Sea around 1 1/2 m E of Toryaneff Is and 9 miles S of Cape Orloff; two crew killed [H/L/Lr/Rn/Mn]

AGAMEMNON II, hired trawler, 15 July 1915, North Sea - 225grt, built 1907, Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, Grimsby-reg GY187 [He – Hull], hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.19, Harwich-based, Skipper Frederick Sibley RNR. With other Harwich sweepers clearing minefield discovered that morning, and in fact laid that morning by UC.1 [Egon von Werner]. Lt-Cdr Hugh Archer of HMS Actaeon, Sheerness Torpedo School, embarked and in command of operation. Recovering sweep when a mine fouling the wire was pulled into the ship and exploded, sank off the Shipwash Sands, off Orford Ness [wi - in 51.57N, 01.36.45E]; 9 ratings lost [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8427/203]

AGAMEMNON [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

AGAMEMNON [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

AGAMEMNON [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 6 March 1915, Attack on the Narrows Forts

AGAMEMNON [04], battleship, 11 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - six trawler minesweepers again attempted to sweep the Kephez lines; one unknown trawler hit by 6in shell and repaired by Agamemnon's carpenters. Gunfire so heavy the trawlers soon withdrew, next night the French sweepers failed to make any progress sailing against the current, and it was decided to man some of the trawlers with regular navy crews. It was noted that the mines were “not as violent as North Sea mines” [Rn/ap/da]

AGAMEMNON [05], battleship – see DARTMOUTH, light cruiser, 15 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign.

AGAMEMNON [06], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

AGAMEMNON [07], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

AGAMEMNON [08], battleship – see ALBION, battleship, 2 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

AGAMEMNON [09], battleship – see TRIUMPH, battleship, 25 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

ALARM, destroyer - see NYMPHE, destroyer, 16 October 1914, North Sea

ALBATROSS, destroyer, 27 November 1915, North Sea - boiler explosion, four stokers killed, three of them buried at Immingham. Presumably English east coast area [dk]

ALBEMARLE, battleship, 6/7 November 1915, off northern Scotland - Duncan-class, c15,200t [Cn - heavily loaded with spare ammunition] sailing with King Edward VII-class battleships Hibernia and Zealandia, all 3rd BS Grand Fleet, left Scapa Flow on 6th for southern ports and the Mediterranean, passing westward through Pentland Firth with strong wind over spring tides, very heavy sea running. Night of 6th/7th [gr - 7th; Cn - 11th] - Seas washed away Albemarle's fore bridge and crushed roof of conning tower, returned to Scapa Flow with Hibernia; 1 officer, 4 ratings washed overboard [gf - 1 officer, 1 rating], others injured. According to Kindell, CPO Aiken, OS Arnold and AB Naylor were probably crushed to death as they were buried ashore; Cdr Nixon and AB Stroud went overboard and drowned. After repairs, returned to Scapa in December. Zealandia also had to turn back to repair damaged gunports [Rn/Cn/D/dx/gf/gr]

ALBION [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

ALBION [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

ALBION [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

ALBION [04], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

ALBION [05], battleship – see QUEEN ELIZABETH, dreadnought, 5 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

ALBION [06], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 6 March 1915, Attack on the Narrows Forts

ALBION [07], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

ALBION [08], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

ALBION [09], battleship, 28 April 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - Canopus-class, 14,300t, 4-12in/12-6in, above Morto Bay on European side off Kereves Dere, providing gunfire support for French forces, shortly after noon, about to be relieved by Lord Nelson. Hit and damaged by Turkish shellfire, leaking and retired to Mudros for three days for repairs [Rn/D/Cn]

ALBION [10], battleship, 2 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - Canopus-class, 14,300t, 4-12in/12-6in, just returned from repairing damage sustained on 28 April, providing gunfire support with Agamemnon, Goliath, Prince George and Vengeance off southern beachheads, operating on French right. Hit badly by Turkish gunfire from Asiatic shore in evening, retired to Mudros again to make good the damage; one man DOW on this date, not known if he was wounded at this time. Next day Prince George, Majestic-class, c16,000t, 4-12in/12-6in, was holed on the waterline by a 6in shell from the Asiatic batteries, had to leave for Mudros, and then for Malta to dock [Rn/D/da]

ALBION [11], battleship, 22 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - Canopus-class, 14,300t, 4-12in/12-6in, providing gunfire support off the Anzac beachhead just south of Anzac Cove. Ran aground off Gabe Tepe on 22nd, under close-range fire by Turkish shore batteries and frequently hit, towed off by sister-ship Canopus on 23rd, left for Malta for repairs; reportedly one man killed and ten wounded, believed from Albion. Kindell only lists two Albion casualties around this time - two men wounded in a shore party on the 22nd who DOW on the 23rd [Cn/D/da/dk/mf]

ALBYN, paddle minesweeper, 23 August 1915, Belgian Coast - ex-Albion, 363grt, built 1893, hired 26/5/15, 1-6pdr AA, one of the first six hired paddlers to arrive at Dover 14/7/15 as the Dover Paddlers, Lt A Daniels RNR i/c, night before swept ahead of monitors for Zeebrugge shoot, now daylight on 23rd, returning to Dover. [do - 22nd] - Attacked by German seaplane, a reported seven bombs dropped in two groups, avoided by helm and engine changes. During many subsequent operations, the paddle minesweepers with their broad beam often became the focus of German air attacks; it was reported on 10 June 1916 that "The paddle sweepers at Dunkirk... [had their routine work] enlivened on most days by attacks from hostile aircraft" [D/do/sc]

ALCANTARA, armed merchant cruiser, 3 June 1915, North Atlantic area - 15,831grt, built 1914, hired 10/3/15. Collided with and sank trawler Kathleen 198grt [D/gr]

ALEXANDRA, hired screw tug, 28 October 1915, Orkneys - [He – Alexandra II], 168grt, built 1907, Liverpool-reg, Alexandra Towing, hired as unarmed patrol boat in Liverpool area 10-12/14, tug from 9/15, Pendant No. T.7, Mr G Jenkinson, Scapa Flow-based. Wrecked at entrance to Hoxa Sound, S side of Scapa Flow [wi - in 58.49N, 03.04.30W] [H/Lr/C/D/He/wi]

ALLIGATOR, gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

ALMERIA, Admiralty blockship, 2,418grt, built 1888, 293ft, Almeria SS, Cardiff-reg. Purchased as accommodation ship 1914/15, assigned as blockship for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.2 Barrier, Skerry Sound, between Glims Holm & Lamb Holm islands [wi - in 58.52.57N, 02.53.51W] [Lr/D/wi]

AMAZON [01], destroyer – see ATTENTIVE, light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast

AMAZON [02], destroyer, 20 October 1914, Belgian Coast – Amazon and Viking, destroyers, F-class, c1,100t, 2-4in/2-18in tt, in company with other 6th DF destroyers and monitors of Dover Patrol, and five French destroyers, in action against German shore targets. A 4in gun on Viking burst and she retired disabled, Amazon [flag, Adm Hood] badly holed by return fire during bombardment of batteries near Lombartzyde just north of Nieuport, put out of action, sent home for repairs; no lives lost [Rn/D/dk/dp]

AMBROSE [01], armed merchant cruiser, 11 March 1915, North Channel - 4,595grt, built 1903, hired 20/11/14, 10th CS. Heading for Liverpool to coal, approaching North Channel, two torpedoes fired in separate attacks off Oversay Island [ss - Ornsay island] off Islay, possibly by U.20. During third attack, conning tower spotted and fired at [Rn/Mn/D/bi/ss]

AMBROSE [02], armed merchant cruiser – see DIGBY, armed merchant cruiser, 14 March 1915, off NW & W Scotland

AMBUSCADE, destroyer - see GERMAN RAID on HARTLEPOOL, SCARBOROUGH and WHITBY, 16 December 1914. K-class, c1,300t, 3-4in/2-21in tt. Lt-Cdr G Coles. Holed forward, had to leave the line around 0550 with 5ft of water in mess-deck, crippled and called for assistance. After seeing Lynx out of danger, Unity searched for Ambuscade and escorted her into Leith; no lives lost. See also HARDY, LYNX [Rn/D/dk/gf]

AMETHYST [01], light cruiser – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

AMETHYST [02], light cruiser – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

AMETHYST [03], light cruiser – see MANX HERO, Admiralty trawler, 10 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign.

AMETHYST [04], light cruiser, 14 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - Gem-class, 3,000t, 12-4in/8-3pdr/2-18in tt, supporting minesweepers in final attempt to clear the Kephez mines at night. Trawlers headed for positions above the mines to be swept, heavy fire disabled all the working crews of two trawlers with damage to gear and winches in the rest so great, only two vessels could get out their sweeps, leaving four trawlers and one picket boat out of action. Amethyst was near Kephez Point at this time trying to draw fire from the sweepers. Night of 14th/15th - Two shells exploded in stoker’s bathroom, starboard side forward and on messdeck; 21 killed and 28 severely wounded, of whom 4 DOW in Amethyst. Around 5 killed and 15 wounded in the other vessels [dk – only three others killed on the 14th, one in battleship Ocean and two on trawler Fentonian [Rn/Cn/da/dk/sm/sc]

AMETHYST [05], light cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

AMPHION [01], light cruiser, 5 August 1914, German Minefields - Southwold minefield laid by auxiliary minelayer Koenigin Luise about 30 miles E of Orford Ness, minelayer sunk by Harwich Force light cruiser Amphion and 3rd DF destroyers. Koenigin Luise was the first German naval loss of the war. Other major surface ship-laid minefields in 1914 were the Tyne, Humber, Tory Island, Yarmouth/Lowestoft and Scarborough/Yorkshire fields. Mines were not laid by U-boats until mid-1915.

AMPHION [02], light cruiser, 6 August 1914, North Sea - Active-class, 4,000t, 1911, 10-4in/4-3pdr/2-21in tt, 25kts, c320 crew, 3rd DF leader, Harwich Force, Capt Cecil Fox. Southern Force, consisting of light cruiser-led 1st & 3rd DF's under Cdre Tyrwhitt and "overseas" submarines under Cdre Keyes left Harwich on 5th to carry out sweep in southern part of the North Sea, supported by 7th CS. The 1st DF went up the Dutch coast followed by Amphion and 3rd DF. Informed by a trawler that a vessel was 'throwing things overboard' 20 miles NE of Outer Gabbard, 3rd DF spread out, destroyers Lance and Landrail went ahead and around 1100, still on the 5th sighted Koenigin Luise. In the chase that followed, Lance 'fired the first naval shots of World War 1', then joined by Amphion, the minelayer was sunk before noon and survivors taken on board Amphion. The sweep continued. Now returning, Amphion changed course in the early hours to avoid the Southwold minefield and by 0630 on the 6th was assumed to be clear, but detonated a mine which wrecked the fore part of the ship, started a fire and broke her back, magazines could not be flooded, and abandon ship ordered. This was followed by another explosion, either the forward magazine exploding or a second mine, and she went down quickly [He - last position in 51.12.N 02.36E; ap - c30 miles E of Orford Ness; dx - 35 miles E of Aldeburgh Napes]; 149 crew lost - 1 officer, 147 ratings including 3 DOW, 1 canteen staff plus 18 of 20 German POW's [Rn/ke - 151 crew, 174 survivors; He - included 18 POW's]. See also LARK, LINNET [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/ap/dk/dx/ke; ADM.137/1002, ADM.137/3107]

ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN, cargo ship, 4 July 1915, Atlantic off S Ireland [Victoria Cross ship] - nitrate carrier converted to horse transport, 7,333grt, built 1912, Lawther Latta & Co/Nitrate Producers SS, not armed, Montreal for Avonmouth with 927 horses for Western Front, 150 crew, master, Lt Frederick Parslow RNR aged 60. U.39 [Walter Forstmann] [dx - U.38; ge - U.20 or U.39] surfaced about 0800 a mile or more away on port beam 90 miles SW of Queenstown [L - in 50.15N, 9W; dx - 50.10N, 09W], ship turned stern on and went to full speed, reached 14kts, submarine opened a steady fire about 0900 frequently hitting, Anglo-Californian continued to manoeuvre in an attempt to escape while transmitting SOS’s. Ordered at 1030 by the U-boat to stop and abandon ship, the master decided to do so, then in response to his signals, destroyers Mentor and Miranda requested him to delay as long as possible. He got under way again, but now U.39 opened a heavy fire wrecking the bridge, all the port-side lifeboats and hitting the superstructure. By the time the U-boat had closed to 50yds, the master was dead and the Germans fired on anything that moved. Throughout the action, the master's eldest son, Fred Parslow was at the wheel or what remained of it. When the destroyers arrived, U.39 dived away and Anglo-Californian was brought into Queenstown on the 5th; 21 lives lost including Lt Frederick Daniel Parslow RNR who was awarded the Victoria Cross. His son and the chief engineer received the DSC and others MID. Sunk 9 June 1918 [H/L/Mn/dx/ge/ms/un/vc] [Casualty list – Lt Parslow only]

ANNE, seaplane carrier – see also AENNE RICKMERS, seaplane carrier.

ANTRIM, cruiser, 9 October 1914, North Sea - Devonshire-class, flagship 3rd CS Grand Fleet, on patrol off Norwegian coast. Attacked by U-boat about 20 miles SW of Skudesnes in the afternoon [gf - 59N, 04.40E], missed by two torpedoes and then attempted to ram [Rn/Mn/D/bi/ge/gf]

AORANGI, Admiralty blockship, August 1915, Orkneys - 4,268grt, built 1883, 389ft, Union SS Co, Dunedin [NZ]-reg, chartered as non-commissioned RAN supply ship 8/14, purchased by Admiralty 1915 for use at Scapa Flow. August - Scuttled as part of No.1 Barrier, Kirk Sound, between island of Lamb Holm & Mainland [wi - in 58.53.26N, 02.51.42W]. Wreck refloated in 1920 [wi - resunk in Holm Kirkyard] [Lr/D/wi]

ARCHER, destroyer, 17 January 1915, North Sea - I-class, c990t, 1st DF, taking part in Harwich Force sweep by three light cruisers and 32 destroyers in to Heligoland Bight, returning in the afternoon. Rammed by trawler and damaged, escorted to Sheerness by sister-ship Ferret [Cn/D/ty]

ARDENT, destroyer, 11 October 1915, North Sea - Ardent and Fortune, K-class, 1,300t, 4th DF, Mandate, Repeat M-class, c1,250t, all Grand Fleet destroyers, sent back to Scapa Flow because of bad weather even through the battle fleet was due to sail for the northern North Sea. Ardent and Fortune in collision, Ardent damaged, Mandate damaged by heavy sea [Cn/D/gf/gr]

ARETHUSA [01], light cruiser - see 28 August 1914, BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT. Arethusa-class, 4,400t, 2-6in/6-4in. Heading into the Heligoland Bight at 0800, came under heavy fire from Stettin and Frauenlob, Fearless arrived and Stettin turned away, Arethusa and Frauenlob were left to their own running battle during which time Arethusa was hit possibly 35 times, her guns going out of action one by one. She was also hit in the engine-room. By now Harwich Force was fairly scattered and under fire from the Heligoland guns. Cdre Tyrwhitt ordered the turn to the west but with only one 6in gun left in operation, continued to fight Frauenlob and left the German in a badly damaged condition before turning herself at the end of the first phase of the action. By 1020, with no enemy in sight and speed down to 10kts, Arethusa stopped to make repairs with Fearless and 1st DF standing by, getting all guns except 2-4in back in working order. Then around 1100, the still-partially crippled flagship was engaged probably by Strassburg or else Stralsund, but chased off by Fearless and her destroyers. As other actions continued, Arethusa met Stettin and then probably Strassburg or else Stralsund again [accounts vary] and came under more fire, but the enemy was driven off. It was around this time that Mainz appeared, trying to escape from 1st LCS, and in her own defence inflicted much damage on the destroyers of 4th Div, 3rd DF [following]. Arethusa was the only large British ship damaged in the battle, towed in by cruiser Hogue; 1 officer, 9 ratings killed, 1 rating DOW, also one officer and 16 men wounded. See also GOSHAWK, LAERTES, LAUREL, LIBERTY [Rn/Cn/D/dd/dk/gh/nb/nh/ty]

ARETHUSA [02], light cruiser – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

ARETHUSA [03], light cruiser – see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915.

ARETHUSA [04], light cruiser – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 24 April 1915, North Sea.

ARETHUSA [05], light cruiser, 2 June 1915, North Sea - Arethusa-class, broad pendant, Harwich Force, on patrol with Undaunted on the lookout out for Zeppelins attacking England, light cruisers each carrying a seaplane. Sighted Zeppelin, seaplane took off but forced to return, opened fire on Zeppelin which made off. Several hours later, German seaplane came out of the clouds and dropped three bombs without hitting Arethusa [Rn/Cn/D/ty]

ARGYLE [may be spelt Argyll], Admiralty blockship, 1,185grt, built 1872, 241ft, T Wilson & Sons, Hull-reg. Purchased 1914 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1914 in No.2 Barrier, Skerry Sound, between Glims Holm & Lamb Holm islands [wi - in 58.52.53N, 02.54.02W] [Lr/D/wi]

ARGYLL [1], cruiser – see ROXBURGH, cruiser, 20 June 1915, North Sea

ARGYLL [02], cruiser, 28 October 1915, North Sea - Devonshire-class, 10,850t, 1904, 4-7.5in/6-6in/2-12pdr/20-3pdr/2tt, 22kts, 655 crew, Pendant No. N.80, 3rd CS Grand Fleet, Capt James Tancred, making for Rosyth to rejoin squadron after refit in Devonport, weather thick, Bell Rock LH blacked out, presumably overran Firth of Forth. Ran on to Bell Rock off Dundee early in the morning [wi - in 56.26N, 02.23.30W], heavy seas soon reduced her to a wreck; Rosyth-based destroyers took off all her crew "in very difficult conditions"; no lives lost. Salvaged for guns, fittings and stores over the next few months, commercial salvage companies later removed non-ferrous metals and bronze propellers, wreck lies scattered at 50ft, only 400ft W of the lighhouse [+J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/ke/wi; ADM.137/3643]

ARIADNE, hired trawler – see C.29, submarine, 29 August 1915, North Sea

ARIEL, destroyer, 10 March 1915, North Sea - I-class, c990t, 2-4in/2-12pdr/2-21in tt, 1st DF, now believed based at Rosyth for service with Grand Fleet, Lt-Cdr Cyril Calaghan. U-boat sighted by trawler off Fife Ness, SE Scotland, three destroyers including Attack and Acheron called up, spotted her on the surface and opened fire, Ariel then rammed the conning tower as she submerged, U.12 came back up, was hit again and scuttled by the crew. Ariel's bow considerably damaged, stern high out of water, docked at Leith for repairs [Rn/Cn/D/ap/gf/ub]

ARIES, Admiralty yacht, 31 October 1915, Dover Straits – one of two naval vessels mined in same field that day, 201grt, built 1880, steam yacht hired as auxiliary patrol vessel 12/9/14, 2-3pdr, Pendant No. 05, Dover Patrol, Lt-Cdr Harry Calder RNR. Mined in field laid by UC.6 [Matthias Graf von Schmettow] the same day off Leathercoat, near Dover; 5 officers including commanding officer, 4 ratings, 14 MN lost. Wreck discovered and lies in 51.00.64N 01.24.41E [He – 22 killed, 9 survivors]. See also OTHELLO II [H/J/L/C/D/He*/dk/dq; ADM.137/3131]

ARK ROYAL [01], seaplane carrier - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

ARK ROYAL [02], seaplane carrier, 19 August 1915, Adriatic - Albert Medal 1st Class, later George Cross was awarded to CPO Michael Sullivan Keogh, HMS Ark Royal. An aircraft taking off from Imbros airfield, crashed and caught fire. CPO Keogh attempted to rescue the fatally injured pilot [dx]

ARLANZA, armed merchant cruiser, November 1915, Barents Sea - 15,044grt, built 1912, hired 3/15, 10th CS Northern Patrol, carried Allied Military Mission to Russia, now returning with Russian Mission. Date uncertain [bi - early 10/15; gf - 29/10; Mn - 14/11] - Mined off Lumbovski near Svyatoi Nos on Murman coast, presumably laid by Meteor, passengers taken off by British SS Novo, towed by a tug and two British minesweeping trawlers into nearby Yukanskie Roads, remained there through the winter, later patched up with help of Russian materials and diving plant, towed home for repairs in June 1916; as repairs impossible through winter of 1915/16, most of crew brought back by an AMC [Mn - Orotova; gf - Orcoma] [Rn/Mn/D/bi/gf]

ASKOLD, Russian cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

ASTRAEA, light cruiser, 8 August 1914, German East Africa - Astraea bombarded Dar-es-Salaam and destroyed the wireless station

ATTACK [01], destroyer, 11 October 1914, Dutch coast - Cdre Tyrwhitt took Harwich Force First Flotilla to sea at 0400 on the 11th to patrol close inshore and try and prevent German submarines reaching Antwerp and using it as a base. Third Flotilla took over on the 13th. Between these two dates, two 1st DF, I-class destroyers, both presumably taking part, were attacked by U-boats off the Dutch coast: Attack [ge -10th] - off Schouwen Bank [Mn/D/ge/ty]; Goshawk [Mn/D/ge/ty]

ATTACK [02], destroyer – see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915.

ATTACK [03], destroyer – see ARIEL, destroyer, 10 March 1915, North Sea

ATTENTIVE [01], light cruiser, 27 September 1914, Dover Straits - Adventure-class, 6th DF leader, Dover Patrol. U.18, the first ever U-boat to pass through the Dover Straits, spotted Attentive off Dover and fired a torpedo which was narrowly avoided [Cn/D/ap/dp/ge/kt]

ATTENTIVE [02], light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast - Dover Patrol was only made a separate command under Rear-Adm Hood on the 12th, and in spite of bad weather that prevented sailing any sooner, by the 17th ships were off the Belgian coast, ready to support the Belgian and French armies in their attempt to halt the Germans along the River Yser, west of Ostend and Zeebrugge. That day four light cruisers including Attentive [flag, Adm Hood], 20 destroyers and three monitors sailed, Adm Hood reaching Nieuport about midnight to establish communications. Next day - the 18th, Attentive and the monitors, Foresight and her four destroyers bombarded German positions and played a major role in holding their infantry attacks. Taking part were Attentive, Adventure-class, Foresight, Forward-class, light cruisers and 6th DF Leaders, Humber, Mersey, Severn, Humber-class monitors, Amazon, Mohawk, Nubian, E-class destroyers, 6th DF. Heavily engaged by shore-based artillery, some shrapnel damage; Mersey lost one Royal Marine on the 20th and Severn, one officer ashore on the same day [Rn/D/dk/dp/dq/dx]

ATTENTIVE [03], light cruiser, 7 September 1915, Belgian Coast - Adventure-class, 2,670t, c9-4in/2-14in tt, 6th DF leader, Capt Johnson, in support of Dover Patrol bombardment force preparing to carry out Ostend shoot, forced to wait for haze to clear. Bombed by aircraft, Attentive hit on deck, one 4in gun disabled; two men killed and seven wounded [Rn/Cn/D/dk/dp/dq]

AUDACIOUS, dreadnought, 27 October 1914, off N Ireland - King George V-class, 25,700t, 1912, 10-13.5in/16-4in/3-21in tt, 21kts, c900 crew, Pendant No. 54, 2nd BS Grand Fleet, Capt Cecil Dampier. With most of Grand Fleet now in Lough Swilly, the eight dreadnoughts of 2nd BS sailed from Loch na Keal, Isle of Mull on the 26th for firing practice, rendezvousing at 0500 on 27th with light cruiser Liverpool, tugs Plover and Flying Condor, and towed targets 30 miles N by W of Tory Island [Rn/gf - 55.45N, 08.30W]. Four hours later, steaming in line ahead, the squadron was just turning to port in fairly heavy seas, Audacious at number three. Explosion port side aft around 0900, 20 miles N 1/4 E of Tory Island [dx - 18 miles N3ºE of Tory Is; gf - 55.34N, 08.30W], came to a stop with port engine-room flooded and centre engine-room partly flooded, not known if mined or torpedoed, rest of squadron steamed away and called for assistance. Damage comparatively light but progressive flooding made her increasingly difficult to manage as the weather worsened. Liverpool circled and the tugs closed in as she began to settle by the stern, then stopped going down and moved ahead slowly under own power. Around 1300, White Star liner Olympic arrived in response to the SOS and tried to take her in tow, but she was now badly down by stern, hard to manage in the seas and the towline parted. Fleet collier Thornhill tried and also failed. Until 1600 it was hoped she could be saved, but by the time battleship Exmouth arrived to tow her in, Audacious' stern was awash and the remaining crew taken off by 1915. At 2045 she capsized and floated upside down for 15min before an immense ammunition explosion sank her at 2100 [in believed loss position: ke/wi - 17 miles N 1/4 E of Tory Island in 55.33.34N, 08.12.30W, although there may some discrepency between the explosion position and distance made before going down], mining confirmed by the sinking of SS Manchester Commerce the previous afternoon, field laid by Berlin on 22/23 October; no lives lost, remaining survivors rescued by Olympic using her lifeboats. Audacious was a major loss to Adm Jellicoe and the Grand Fleet. The Admiralty tried to hide her loss and withheld information from the British press, but a photograph taken by an American on board Olympic soon appeared around the world. Wreck lies capsized in general depth of 200ft. See also LIVERPOOL [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/gf/ke/wi]

AURORA [01], light cruiser – see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915.

AURORA [02], light cruiser - see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 24 April 1915, North Sea.

AUSTRALIA [01] [RAN], battlecruiser, 30 August 1914, German Pacific Possessions - German Samoa captured by New Zealand troops supported by Australian, British, New Zealand and French warships; Australian battlecruiser Australia, light cruiser Melbourne plus old light cruisers Philomel [NZ], Psyche [NZ], Pyramus [RN] took part.

AUSTRALIA [02] [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions - following Australian landings near Rabaul, the German governor surrendered all German New Guinea on 15th, i.e. Kaiser Wilhelm Land in NE New Guinea, New Pommern now New Britain, New Mecklenburg now New Ireland, and Bougainville, northern Solomon Islands, all to Australian forces around this date. Australian battlecruiser Australia, light cruisers Melbourne and Sydney, old light cruiser Encounter, destroyers Parramatta, Warrego and Yarra, submarines AE.1 and AE.2 [lost], and armed transport Berrima took part


B

B.3, submarine, 2 October 1914 - Dover Straits. B-class, Dover Patrol 4th Flotilla. Attacked by U-boat S of Goodwins, torpedo missed, may have been U.18 [Rn/Mn/D/ge]

B.6 [01], submarine - see E.15, submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

B.6 [02], submarine, 16 August 1915, Eastern Mediterranean - B.6, [Lt C MacArthur] and B.11 [Lt N Holbrook], submarines, B-class, 287/316t, 2-18in tt, Mudros-based, from Alexandria with ABS Heroic for patrol off the Libyan/Egyptian border, information received that Turkish arms would be smuggled to Senussi tribesmen by German U-boats. Lt Holbrook attempted to land in a small boat under a flag of truce near Sollum, became suspicious and pulled back to B.11, shore group opened fire and riddled casings and bridge screens of both submarines with bullets; Lt Holbrook hit in the face by a ricochet, on B.6, ERA killed and fell overboard, CERA badly wounded, Coxswain slightly [Cn/dk/md]

B.11 [01], submarine, 13 December 1914, Dardanelles - Lt Norman Douglas Holbrook [CO, HM S/M B.11] awarded Victoria Cross for sinking Turkish guardship/old battleship Messudiyeh

B.11 [02], submarine - see E.15, submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

B.11 [03], submarine – see B.6, submarine, 16 August 1915, Eastern Mediterranean

B.11 [04], submarine, 11 December 1915, Adriatic Sea - B-class, 287/316t, 2-18in tt, on patrol off Punta Salvore. Attacked by Austrian flying boat whose engine failed, came down 500yds off, submarine's maxim gun brought up but jammed, B.11 then tried to ram but the flying boat crew got the engine going and took off [Cn/md]

BACCHANTE, cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

BADGER, destroyer - see ENGADINE, seaplane carrier, 25 October 1914, North Sea.

BALAKANI, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 9 September 1915, North Sea - 3,696grt, built 1899, Petroleum SS Co, London-reg, Mr F White, Port Arthur for London with oil fuel. Mined, laid by UC.1 [Egon von Werner], sank 1/2 m SW of South Longsand Buoy, off Clacton [L/te - 51.31.15N, 01.20E; wi - 1/2 m SW by S of, in 51.31.11N, 01.20.57E]; six crew lost [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

BALBUS [01], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

BALBUS [02], gunboat, Niger Flotilla, 8 October 1914, Cameroons Campaign - Nigerian Government tug, taken into service 9/14, 3-37mm, taking part in combined naval and military operation from Duala against German forces further inland, towing lighter armed with 6in gun. Force had to retreat later in the day, Balbus went aground so hard she had to be abandoned. Note: Dittmar does not list her as lost, possibly salvaged [Rn/D]

BALMEDIE, hired trawler, 27 April 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - 205grt, built 1906, Balgownie Steam Trawl Fishing Co, Aberdeen-reg A113, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.350, Skipper George Reynolds RNR. In collision, sank in the Dardanelles [C - off]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk]

BANYERS, hired trawler, 6 January 1915, North Sea - or The Banyers, 448grt, built 1914, South Western Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY128, hired 12/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.450, Lt Hubert Boothby RNR, sweeping. Mined in Scarborough field laid by German cruiser Kolberg between Fiely and Scarborough, sank “very quickly” off Cayton Bay, S of Scarborough [wi - in 54.15.07N, 00.15.24W]; 2 ratings lost [He/wi - 6 crew], Skipper escaped through wheel-house window, 11 survivors rescued by other ships. Lt Boothby lost HMS Orianda less than a month before, was awarded the DSC and later wrote about his experiences in “Spunyarn”, published 1935 [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/ap/dk/wi; ADM.137/84]

BARALONG [01], Q-ship, 19 August 1915, "The Baralong Incident" – an Admiralty collier [and a second British vessel] was sunk by U.27 [Bernd Wegener], then an attack on a third vessel led to U.27 being sunk by HMS Baralong:

BEN VRACKIE, Admiralty collier, 3,908grt, built 1905, Watson Brothers Shipping Co, Glasgow-reg, sailing Cardiff for Malta with coal and stores. [te/un - 18th] - Captured by U.27, sunk by gunfire 55 miles NW by N of Scillies [L - in 50.24N, 07.55W; te/un - 50.30N, 07.30W] [H/L/Lr/te/un];

NICOSIAN, cargo steamship, 6,369grt, built 1912, Leyland Line, Liverpool, sailing New Orleans for Liverpool, carrying mules. [L - 20th] - stopped at 1500 by U.27 [Wegener], 73 miles S by W of Old Head of Kinsale [L - in 50.22N, 08.12W; dx - 50.43N, 07.22W; ge - c100 miles S of Queenstown], Q-ship Baralong was nearby, sighted Nicosian and received signals she had been captured by one or two U-boats. Baralong, headed as if to pick up Nicosian's crew from their boats, the U-boat passed behind the stopped ship to intercept the new arrival and when she appeared again, Baralong had the White Ensign hoisted and opened a heavy fire from 600yds which soon sank U.27. As Baralong picked up Nicosian's crew, Germans were seen swimming for the stopped ship and fearing they would board and scuttle her, opened fire on them in the water. Four Germans managed to reach her and disappeared below. With guns and ammunition onboard, Baralong sent her small Royal Marine contingent across to hunt them down, no doubt on a "shoot-on-sight" basis, before they could do any damage. All four were killed. Nicosian's crew returned and brought her into Bristol holed by U-boat shells. On the bases of reports by some of the American muleteers carried by Nicosian, the Germans described the incident as an atrocity and demanded the crew of Baralong be tried for murder and punished. Britain agreed to an impartial tribunal as long as the enquiry included the sinkings of liner Arabic, firing on the boats of collier Ruel and the attack on E.13 in neutral waters. The Germans dropped their demands although still threatened reprisals [H/L/Rn/Mn/dx/ge/ms]

BARALONG [02], Q-ship, 24 September 1915, Atlantic - U.41 sunk by steamer Baralong 90 miles W of Ushant. She was not damaged in the action, her second success in five weeks [dx]

BARBADOS, hired trawler – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

BARHAM, dreadnought – see WARSPITE, dreadnought, 3 December 1915, North Sea

BARON ERSKINE, Admiralty collier, 19 August 1915, Atlantic off SW England - 5,585grt, built 1911, Hogarth Shipping Co, Ardrossan-reg, 114 crew, on Admiralty charter for this voyage, Avonmouth for New Orleans in ballast. After U.38 [Max Valentiner] had shelled Restormel, the U-boat headed for the expectant Baron Erskine and fired a warning shot, she headed at full speed for Land’s End sending SOS, continued to be chased and shelled. At 0840 shrapnel brought down the radio aerial, she stopped and after the crew had taken to the boats, torpedo hit port side in the engine-room. Six more shells were fired into the hull, she went down at 0920, 25 miles NNW of Bishop Rock [wi - in 50.12N, 06.50W]; ship’s boats headed for St Ives, picked up by Rovenska and landed at Penzance. One of three colliers sunk by U.38 at this time – see also RESTORMEL, SAMARA [H/L/te/un/wi]

BARRY, fleet messenger, 18 August 1915, Aegean Sea - also store carrier, ex-excursion paddle steamer, 398grt, built 1907, hired 29/6/15 [C - as minesweeper], Pendant No. Y4.28, based at Mudros, serving as supply ship off Dardanelles, carrying supplies to Suvla Bay. In collision with hired screw minesweeper Whitby Abbey [do - ABS] in Mudros Bay, island of Lemnos, stern badly damaged and had to unload cargo, repaired by repair ship Reliance. Believed returned to duties in September carrying men, ammunition, mail and supplies to Anzac Cove and Suvla Bay, often under shellfire but never hit [C/Cn/D/da/do]

BASILISK [01], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

BASILISK [02], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

BATTLE OF CORONEL, 1 November 1914, South East Pacific – [I] Aware that Adm von Spee's East Asiatic Cruiser Squadron was heading across the Pacific for South American waters, the Admiralty ordered Adm Cradock who had been working his way down the east coast of South America searching for German raiders and merchantmen, to concentrate a strong-enough squadron off the southern coast of Chile. His main force, two old cruisers Good Hope [Flag] and Monmouth, newly-commissioned with large numbers of reservists, were no match for the worked-up 8.2in-armed Scharnhorst and Gneisenau with their crack gunnery, neither were light cruiser Glasgow and armed merchant cruiser Otranto for German light cruisers Leipzig, Dresden, later joined by Nurnberg. Old 12in-gunned battleship Canopus was some 300 miles behind convoying British colliers.

[II] The four British ships were now heading in a northerly direction, 15 miles apart but only searching for the expected Leipzig, Glasgow nearest the Chilean coast some 50 miles W of Coronel. Smoke was sighted at 1620, Glasgow confirmed it was not one German light cruiser but two cruisers, and shortly fell back on Good Hope, Cradock tried to force the action while the setting sun was behind him blinding the Germans, but they declined. Instead von Spee waited for the sun to set leaving the British ships silhouetted and his own ships lost in the dusk before opening fire around 1900, strong winds and heavy seas meant the British lower casemate guns could not be worked.

[III] In a short time both Good Hope and Monmouth had been overwhelmed and sunk, and Glasgow damaged but along with Otranto managed to escape. Two days later Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Nurnberg entered Valparaiso for 24 hours, and on 8 December, the whole squadron appeared off the Falklands Islands. See also GOOD HOPE, MONMOUTH, GLASGOW [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/dk/ke/nb/nh; ADM.116/1354, ADM.116/1355, ADM.137/3851].



BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT, 28 August 1914 – [I] Harwich Force [Cdre Tyrwhitt] sailed to attack German destroyer patrols in the Heligoland Bight in cooperation with submarines of Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, supported by two destroyers [Cdre Keyes]. Surface units taking part originally consisted of [1] Harwich Force light cruisers Arethusa [broad pendant, but commissioned only a matter of days] with 3rd DF, 16 destroyers and Fearless with 1st DF, 15 destroyers, [2] Humber-based battlecruisers Invincible and New Zealand in support, and [3] Southern Force cruisers in reserve off Terschelling. The Harwich Flotillas headed south from Horn Reef LV in the early morning of 28th towards the west of Heligoland, coming into action with destroyer patrols on the way and reaching there around 0800 to sweep west.

[II] The Admiralty ordered additional support by [4] the three remaining battlecruisers of 1st BCS [Adm Beatty] and [5] six light cruisers of 1st LCS [Cdre Goodenough] but the wireless message confirming these additional forces failed to reach either Tyrwhitt or Keyes and contributed to a confusing and complex series of actions in scattered misty conditions. Added to this was the danger to and from the British submarines of not having this information. German destroyers of 1st and 5th TBF's were out in force, joined in ones and twos by old German light cruisers Stettin, Frauenlob, Mainz, Strassburg, Koeln, Stralsund, Ariadne, Kolberg and Danzig, some of which had to raise steam before coming out; the state of tide also prevented German battlecruisers joining them before it was too late.

[III] By the time the British forces retired just after 1300, Harwich Force had sunk destroyer V.187 and disabled cruisers Frauenlob and Mainz, 1st LCS finished off Mainz, and 1st BCS ships steaming down from the north at midday sank Koeln and Ariadne and were only prevented by mist from destroying others; damage was also inflicted on Strassburg, Stettin, destroyer V.1, and torpedo boats D.8, T.33. German losses totalled over 1,000 killed. Harwich Force Arethusa and destroyers Goshawk, Laurel, Liberty and Laertes were damaged. Royal Navy Battle Honour - HELIGOLAND 1914. See also ARETHUSA, GOSHAWK, LAERTES, LAUREL, LIBERTY [Rn/Cn/D/dd/dk/gh/nb/nh/ty]



BATTLE OF THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915 – [I] German 1st Scouting Group consisting of battlecruisers Seydlitz [flag, Adm Hipper], Moltke [both 11in-armed], Derfflinger [12in], armoured cruiser Blücher [8.2in], 2nd SG light cruisers Graudenz, Stralsund, Rostock, Kolberg, and destroyers sailed to attack British fishing vessels and patrols on the Dogger Bank. Warned by Room 40, Grand Fleet including the 1st LCS [Cdre Goodenough] and 1st BCS [Lion, flag, Adm Beatty] together with Harwich Force [Cdre Tyrwhitt] put to sea to rendezvous in the NE part of the Bank.

[II] Delays due to fog meant that Harwich Force light cruiser Arethusa was heading north half an hour ahead of light cruiser leaders Aurora, Undaunted and their destroyers. Shortly after 0700 Aurora, sighted a cruiser in the SE Dogger Bank area, believed her to be Arethusa and challenged, then opened fire on the German Kolberg at 0715 from 8,000yds: AURORA, Arethusa-class, 4,400t, 2-6in/6-4in/4-21in tt, leader 1st DF Harwich Force. Hit three times and slightly damaged, Kolberg damaged more severely and turned away [Rn/Cn/D/ty]

[III] As the British ships continued towards the rendezvous, the Germans sighted 1st LCS, shortly turned for home and by 0750 could be seen by Adm Beatty’s 1st LCS. In the ensuing stern chase, the battlecruisers headed approximately south east, with Indomitable lagging behind. Lion opened fire on Blücher at 0852, started hitting at 0907, then moved up to Derfflinger while Tiger and Princess Royal concentrated on Blücher, both Germans being hit. Lion received her first damage around 0928, and at 0935 Beatty ordered 1st BCS to engage their opposite numbers - New Zealand on Blücher, Princess Royal on Derfflinger, Tiger on Moltke, Lion on Seydlitz. Unfortunately Tiger fired at Seydlitz, leaving Moltke free to concentrate on Lion, and although the German ships were being hit, Lion was again hurt at 0954 and 1001. Blücher now pulled out of line while the other three German ships continued on their course, and by 1048 was circling out of control.

[IV] Lion was damaged again at 1018 and between 1035 and 1050. At 1100 her damaged was so severe she dropped astern, then due to signalling errors, the other three British battlecruisers concentrated on Blücher. Adm Beatty crossed to destroyer Attack and by 1150 was getting ready to transfer his flag to Princess Royal and continue after the Germans. Then at noon the battlecruisers returned from sinking Blücher. Although Seydlitz and Derfflinger were badly damaged [their experiences led to far better flash protection that served them well at Jutland], Adm Beatty was deeply disappointed he had failed to destroy all four big ships. Tiger was also hit but the other three battlecruisers were untouched. Royal Navy Battle Honour - DOGGER BANK 1915. See also LION, METEOR, TIGER [Rn/Cn/D/ti/ty]



BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914 – [I] With news of the British defeat off Coronel, battlecruisers Invincible [flag, Vice-Adm Sturdee] and Inflexible, 2nd BCS Grand Fleet were ordered to the South Atlantic sailing from Devonport on 11 November. At this time it was not known if von Spee would head round Cape Horn, go north to Panama Canal, or even turn back into the Pacific. Of the ships in the South Atlantic, old battleship Canopus reached the Falklands on the 12 November and remained at Port Stanley as guardship, berthed on the mud, while cruisers Carnarvon [flag, Rear-Adm Stoddart], Cornwall, Kent, and light cruisers Bristol, Glasgow sailed for a rendezvous at Abrolhos Rocks which Adm Sturdee reached on the 26th. On this same day Adm von Spee, after coaling off the southern Chile coast, sailed to attack the Falkland Islands and destroy the facilities there. Fortunately for the British, they were so delayed rounding Cape Horn that Adm Sturdee was able to reach there first, arriving the morning of 7 December, by which time armed merchant cruiser Macedonia had joined. His plan was to coal, allow Bristol to repair her engines, then sail by the 9th for Cape Horn before von Spee came east.

[II] The first German ships were sighted from Sapper Hill at 0750. At this time Macedonia was on patrol off Port Stanley and had not coaled, Invincible and Inflexible were coaling, only Carnarvon and Glasgow had finished refuelling, and Cornwall, Kent and Bristol were still waiting, Cornwall also had an engine opened up at 6 hours notice and Bristol was still repairing hers with fires drawn. As Gneisenau and Nurnberg approached to shell the wireless station, Canopus fired four shells at extreme range around 0915, fragments of one or perhaps a ricochet possibly hit Gneisenau, they turned away to join the German flagship and the squadron headed SE away from the Falklands at full speed. Kent had left the harbour by 0915, Glasgow weighed to join her, Inflexible, Invincible and Cornwall sailed out at 1000, followed by Carnarvon and then around 1100 by Bristol which with Macedonia was diverted to search for the German colliers, sinking two out of three southeast of the Falklands.

[III] Invincible and Inflexible in the lead opened fire on the lagging Leipzig at 1251, then realising there was no escape, von Spee ordered his three light cruisers to scatter south at 1320 while the two cruisers headed NE to cover their retreat. At this time, the two British battlecruisers joined by the slower Carnarvon engaged cruisers Scharnhorst [flag, sunk 1617] and Gneisenau [sunk around 1800]. cruiser Kent went after light cruiser Nurnberg [action started 1615, sunk 1927], sister ship Cornwall after Leipzig, and light cruiser Glasgow after Dresden [which escaped]. Because Glasgow could only gain on Dresden slowly, she transferred her attention to Leipzig to give Cornwall time to catch up, Glasgow opening fire at 1453, Cornwall coming into action around 1615. After Leipzig was sunk [at 2123], Glasgow went after Dresden again but with her speed reduced lost the German in the mist and rain. Royal Navy Battle Honour - FALKLANDS 1914. See also CARNARVON, CORNWALL, GLASGOW, INVINCIBLE, INFLEXIBLE, KENT [Rn/D/dk/nb/nh]



BAYANO [01], armed merchant cruiser, 11 March 1915, North Channel - ex-passenger ship, 5,948grt, built 1913, 14kts, Elders & Fyffes, Liverpool, hired 8/14 [C/wi - 21/11/14], 2-6in, Pendant No. M.78, 10th CS Northern Patrol, Cdr Henry Carr i/c, master, Lt Bernard Dunphy RNR. After coaling in the Clyde, left night of 10th to return to patrol line [Rn/wd - for Liverpool to coal], sailing without lights at 13kts, very calm dark night. Torpedoed by U.27 [Bernd Wegener] amidships under boiler room around 0515, magazines exploded and she sank within 4min in Firth of Clyde, 10 miles SE by E of Corsewall Point, Galloway [ke - 10 miles WNW of; wi - in 55.03.03N, 05.26.03W]; 196 lives lost - 14 officers, 124 ratings and 59 merchant seamen [ke - 195 lost], 26 survivors - 2nd i/c, 7 officers and men picked up by ABS Tara, 18 PO's and men on two liferafts by SS Balmerino and landed at Ayr. Wreck believed to lie at 330ft [H/J/L/Rn/Mn/C/Cn/D/He/bi/dk/gf/ke/ss/te/un/wd/wi; ADM.137/185]

BAYANO [02], armed merchant cruiser – see DIGBY, armed merchant cruiser, 14 March 1915, off NW & W Scotland

BEAGLE [01], destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

BEAGLE [02], destroyer – see GOLIATH, battleship, 13 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

BEDOUIN, hired trawler, 13 February 1915, Atlantic off N Ireland - 188grt, built 1902, GN80, T L Devlin, Granton-reg hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.353, Skipper George Hollins RNR [wi - W Forbes up to 1914]. Sailed from Sheephaven, northern Ireland to clear mines in the Berlin's Tory Island field with other trawlers, recovering her gear around 1555 and at least one mine seen to be snagged, orders given to veer away, but one exploded blowing away her starboard quarter, sank stern first off Tory Is, off Co Donegal; no lives lost [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/3116]

BELLEROPHON, dreadnought, 27 August 1914, off Orkneys - Bellerophon-class, 22,100t, 4th BS Grand Fleet. In collision with SS St Clair passing through the Fleet, not seriously damaged [D/Cn/gf/gr]

BELLONA, light cruiser, 17 December 1914, North Sea - Bellona, light cruiser, Boadicea-class, 3,800t and Broke, flotilla leader, Faulknor-class, 2,000t, both Grand Fleet, following Scarborough Raid and before returning to Scapa Flow, Grand Fleet carried out battle practice with Harwich Force. Both in collision and "seriously damaged", escorted to Rosyth by cruiser Devonshire; no lives lost [Cn/D/dk/gf]

BEN ARDNA, hired trawler, 8 August 1915, North Sea - 187grt, built 1912, R Irvin, Aberdeen-reg A517, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.289, Dover Patrol. Engaged in sweeping, mined at 1330, mine laid by UC.1 [Egon von Werner] three days before, sank quickly about 3/4 mile E of Elbow Buoy, off North Foreland/Broadstairs, Kent; 2 ratings lost. Note: Lloyds lists her as fishing when sunk, not in Admiralty service [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/sc/un; ADM.1/8429/224]

BEN CRUACHAN, Admiralty collier, 30 January 1915, Irish Sea - 3,092grt, built 1902, Morrison Shipping Co, North Shields-reg, Mr W Harley, sailing Scapa Flow for Liverpool [te/wi - Cardiff for Scapa Flow with coal]. Captured by U.21 [Otto Hersing] in Liverpool Bay, torpedoed but failed to sink, U-boat went alongside, boarding party laid explosive scuttling charges, ship sank at 1030, 15 miles NW of Morecambe LV [L/te/un/wi - in 53.36N, 03.51W]; crew in two boats directed to steer for sailing trawler Margaret, landed at Fleetwood [H/L/Lr/Mn/ap/ge/te/un/wi]

BEN VRACKIE, Admiralty collier – see BARALONG, Q-ship, 19 August 1915, "The Baralong Incident"

BEN-MY-CHREE, seaplane carrier 12 August 1915, Gallipoli – during the British offensive at Suvla, Short Type 184 seaplanes from Ben-my-Chree carried out first ever aerial torpedo attacks, launching 14in torpedoes in the Dardanelles area against Turkish ships on the 12th and 17th. The results in ships sunk or damaged is uncertain [dx]

BENGROVE, Admiralty collier, 7 March 1915, Bristol Channel - 3,840grt, built 1910, Steam Transport Co [Joseph Hoult & Co], Liverpool-reg, 33 crew, Mr W Barber, Barry for France with 5,850t coal, steaming at 9kts. Torpedoed abaft engine room by U.20 Walther Schweiger], settled with list to starboard, boats ordered away, sank stern first about 30min later, 5 miles NNE of Ilfracombe, Devon [L - 5 miles N of; wi - in 51.17.52N 04.07.28W]; crew rowed to SS Paignton, transferred to Ilfracombe lifeboat, landed there soon after 1500 [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

BERKSHIRE, Admiralty blockship, 2,285grt, built 1894, 285ft, Berkshire SS Co, Newcastle-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Sunderland, Durham - final scuttling location not known [Lr/D]

BERKSHIRE, Admiralty trawler, 15 May 1915, North Channel - 133grt, built 1897, North Lincolnshire Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY398, hired 1915 [D - 12/14] as patrol vessel, 1-4in, Admiralty No.995, Skipper Herbert Percy Fleet RNR [wi - A Bland, Captain]. In collision with armed yacht Valiant II [1,885grt], sank at 1900 off Cushendall, Red Bay, Co Antrim [He - 6 miles E of Tor Cor Point, in Red Bay; wi - in 55.05N, 06W]; no lives lost, crew rescued by armed trawler Alsatian [H/Lr/C/D/dk/wi; ADM.137/114, ADM.137/623]

BERRIMA [RAN], armed transport – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

BIRKENHEAD, light cruiser – see CARIBBEAN, accommodation ship, 27 September 1915, off N Scotland

BIRMINGHAM [01], light cruiser, 9 August 1914, North Sea - Birmingham-class, 6,040t, 1st LCS, screening battle squadrons. Sighted submarine on surface in thick fog 120 miles ESE of Orkneys [dx - in 58.35N, 01.56E], from the hammering, machinery repairs apparently being carried out, rammed and sank U.15 around 0400. Birmingham went into dry dock for bow repairs. First U-boat sunk by Royal Navy [Cn/D/dx/ge/gf/kt/ub/un]

BIRMINGHAM [02], light cruiser, 19 June 1915, North Sea - Birmingham-class, 2nd LCS Grand Fleet, with sister-ship Nottingham, 3rd CS including Argyll and Roxburgh and just four screening destroyers making sweep from Rosyth across North Sea between the 18th and 21st. Attacked by U.32 without success, one of a series of attacks by four U-boats - see ROXBURGH, cruiser, 20 June 1915, North Sea [Rn/Cn/D/gf]

BLAKEDOWN, Admiralty trawler, 19 January 1915, North Sea - 207grt, built 1900, Grimsby-reg GY1162, hired 1/15, Admiralty No.1044. [Other sources – 19 February] - Stranded and total wreck at Crudensgeir or Cruden Skares, near Peterhead, Aberdeenshire [wi - Bay of Cruden, near Newburgh, in 57.24.30N, 01.51.15W]; no lives lost [H/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/86]

BLANCHE, light cruiser – see CONQUEROR, dreadnought, 15 December 1914, Orkneys.

BLENHEIM, destroyer depot ship – see SCORPION, destroyer, 27 April 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

BOADICEA, light cruiser – see CONQUEROR, dreadnought, 15 December 1914, Orkneys.

BONAR LAW, hired trawler, 27 October 1915, Dover Straits - 284grt, built 1912, Hull-reg H437, Pickering & Haldane's Steam Trawling, hired 2/15 as minesweeper [He – employed as patrol vessel], 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1223, Dover Patrol, Lt Alfred Stableford RNR. [wi - 28th] - In collision with SS Dwina [756grt], 1/2 mile W of South Goodwin light vessel, off Deal and sank [wi - in 51.07.38N, 01.24.39E]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/hw/wi; ADM.137/167]

BOY EDDIE, hired drifter – see SILVERY WAVE, hired drifter, 13 November 1915, Atlantic off SW England

BRANKSOME CHINE, Admiralty chartered collier, 23 February 1915, English Channel - one of two colliers sunk by U.8. 2,026grt, built 1899, Branksome Chine SS Co [H G Harper & Co], Cardiff-reg, Mr F Anstey, Grimsby Roads for Portsmouth with coal. Torpedoed and sunk by U.8 [Alfred Stoss] 6 miles E by S 3/4 S of Beachy Head, near Eastbourne [L - about 6 miles ESE of; wi - in 50.41.06N, 00.20.30E]. See also OAKBY [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un/wi]

BRAZEN, destroyer – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

BRIGHTON QUEEN [01], paddle minesweeper – see PASSING, hired trawler, 19 December 1914, North Sea.

BRIGHTON QUEEN [02], paddle minesweeper, 6 October 1915, Belgian Coast - 553grt, built 1897, ex-excursion steamer, Shoreham-reg, P & A Campbell, first paddler taken up, hired 16/9/14 for conversion at Devonport, Admiralty No.181, with Grimsby unit of 6 sweepers, Lt Eric Rees RNR in command, operations area between Humber & Belgian coast, attached to Dover Patrol, based at Dunkirk, sweeping at night [according to “Swept Channels”] in the West Deep, off Nieuport with Devonia, Glen Avon, Westward Ho. About to turn and head for Dunkirk at 0145, mine exploded under paddle box, laid by UC.5 [Herbert Pustkuchen], ship broke in two and sank within minutes [He – at 1430], 4 miles off Nieuport pier, near Ostend in West Deep; 6 ratings and 1 MN killed, 1 rating died of wounds, other ships lowered boats and rescued 34 of crew of 41, four survivors taken to hospital in Dunkirk, rest to Dover on board destroyer Viking. First Admiralty paddler lost [H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/ap/dk/do/ge/sc/te/un; ADM.1/8435/298]

BRILLIANT, light cruiser - see VENERABLE, battleship, 28 October 1914, Belgian Coast

BRISTOL [01], light cruiser. 6 August 1914, West Indies - German light cruiser Karlsruhe in action with Bristol 250 miles NE of Eleuthera Island, Bahamas, Karlsruhe escaped

BRISTOL [02], light cruiser – see CARMANIA, armed merchant cruiser, 14 September 1914, Central Atlantic.

BRISTOL [03], light cruiser– see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914.

BRITANNIA, battleship, 26 January 1915, North Sea - King Edward VII-class, c17,290t, 3rd BS Grand Fleet. Ran aground on Inchkeith island, Firth of Forth in fog, ashore for 36hr and considerably damaged, refloated, needed dockyard repairs [Cn/D/gf]

BRITON, hired trawler, 21 July 1915, North Sea - 196grt, built 1906, John Lewis, Aberdeen-reg A101, hired 2/15, armed, Admiralty No.1170, patrol vessel, 13 crew, Skipper Peter Christie RNR, probably Harwich-based, guardship for outer group of unarmed minesweepers ordered to sweep area around Longsand LV where HMS Rhiannon was lost the day before, most of the crew below having their evening meal. Mined at 1715, mine laid by UC.3 [Erwin Weisbach] on 5 July, “stern broke off, the bow went up into the air and was then hidden by a column of water and smoke. When this cleared away there remained of the ship nothing”, sank 13 cables SW of Longsand LV, off Clacton [wi - in 51.40N, 01.29E]; Skipper and 10 ratings lost [wi - all 13 crew lost; He/ap - three crew saved] [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/ap/dk+/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8427/194, ADM.1/8428/207]

BROKE, flotilla leader – see BELLONA, light cruiser, 17 December 1914, North Sea.

BUDRIE, Admiralty blockship 2,252grt, built 1882, 285ft, Arab Steamers, Bombay-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in about 40-60ft, second blockship from north in Burra Sound, between Hoy & Graemsay islands [wi - in 58.55.40N, 03.18.38W]. Wreck dispersed in 1962 to clear shipping channel [Lr/wi/www]

BULLDOG [01], destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

BULLDOG [02], destroyer – see GOLIATH, battleship, 13 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

BULLFINCH, destroyer, 15 August 1914, North Sea - C-class, 390t, with 7th Patrol Flotilla, Grimsby. In collision, location and damage not known; 4 ratings killed, three of them buried at Grimsby [D/dk]

BULWARK, battleship, 26 November 1914, North Sea - London-class, 15,700t, 1899, 4-12in/12-6in/18-12pdr/4-18in tt, 18kts, c750 crew, Pendant No. 95, 5th BS Channel Fleet, originally Portland-based, transferred to Sheerness on 15th, Capt Guy Sclater, believed returned from patrol, moored at No.17 Buoy, in Kethole Reach off Sheerness in the River Medway, loading ammunition from lighters alongside. Suddenly blew up at 0753 with "an appalling explosion... when the smoke cleared she had entirely disappeared" [wi - in 51.25.21N, 00.39.16E], sabotage was originally suspected but in mid-December the court of enquiry established that ammunition had accidentally ignited, probably caused by careless handling of black powder charges on upper deck; 792 lives lost - 50 officers, 738 ratings and 4 canteen staff [Rn/He/wi - 738 lives lost, 12 survivors; dx - 746 lost]. Wreck lies in 30ft marked by two buoys. Bulwark was only the first of five large British warships destroyed by internal explosions, probably due to cordite problems, followed by minelayer Princess Irene and cruiser Natal in 1915, dreadnought Vanguard in 1917, and monitor Glatton in 1918 [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dx/ke/tr/wi; ADM.116/1370]

BURESK, Admiralty collier, 27 September 1914, Indian Ocean - 4,337grt, built 1914, Buresk SS Co, London-reg, Mr Frederick Taylor, Port Said for Hong Kong with 6,000t high-grade Welsh coal. Captured by Emden 180 miles W by N 3/4 N true from Colombo [L - in 07.55N, 76.50E; kp - 07.24N, 76.41E], retained as prison ship and collier under command of Lt-Cdr R Kloepper, coaled Emden in Nicobar Islands on 26 October, approached Keeling Island to coal her again, chased by HMAS Sydney after Emden was destroyed on 9 November and overhauled, but German prize crew were already scuttling her, boarding party found inlet valves opened and damaged [L - sunk by HMAS Sydney at Keeling Island] [H/L/Lr/Rn/Mn/D/kp]

BURMA, oiler – see XERXES, hired trawler, 16 November 1915, North Sea

BURRSFIELD, Admiralty collier, 5 October 1915, Central Mediterranean - may be spelt Bursfield, 4,037grt, built 1902, London-reg, Burrsfield SS, Mr A Hunt, Barry/Malta for Salonica/Dardanelles with government and general stores. Overhauled and stopped by U.33 [Konrad Gansser], sunk by gunfire 70 miles W of Cape Matapan; master, 4th engineer, messroom steward and a fireman killed by gunfire during the chase [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un]

BUSH, hired trawler, 23 June 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland - 221grt, built 1908, Milford-reg, hired 5/15, 1-12pdr, Skipper G King, on patrol off Hebrides about 8 miles NNW of Butt of Lewis, two drifters fishing nearby, wind blowing hard, "considerable sea". Shell landed nearby and submarine sighted, returned fire, third shot fell near the U-boat which submerged, Bush slightly damaged by the six shells fired at her; Admiralty awarded £60 to the crew [D/Mn]

BUSTARD [01], gunboat – see VENERABLE, battleship, 28 October 1914, Belgian Coast

BUSTARD [02], gunboat, 4 November 1914, Belgian Coast Operations - Bombardment of Lombartzyde near Nieuport by old gunboats Bustard and Excellent

BUSTARD [03], gunboat, 6 November 1914, Belgian Coast Operations - Bombardment of Westend and Lombartzyde by monitor Humber and old gunboat Bustard

C

C.9, submarine - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914.

C.24 [01], submarine, 23 June 1915, North Sea - U.40 sunk by decoy combination trawler Taranaki/submarine C.24 off Aberdeen, first success by decoy ship against a U-boat [dx]

C.24 [02], submarine – see C.33, submarine, 4 August 1915, North Sea

C.27 [01], submarine – see PRINCESS LOUISE, hired trawler, 20 July 1915, off Fair Isle - U.23 sunk by combination decoy trawler Princess Louise/submarine C.27

C.27 [02], submarine – see C.33, submarine, 4 August 1915, North Sea

C.29, submarine, 29 August 1915, North Sea - C-class, c290/320t, 1909, 218in tt with 4 torpedoes, 13/7.5kts, 16 crew, Pendant No. I.59, Rosyth-based 7th Flotilla, Lt William Schofield, on anti-U-boat patrol with decoy trawler Ariadne, submerged, in tow and in telephone contact with Ariadne. Underwater explosion and tow rope went slack, mined off the Humber near Outer Dowsing LV [bw - 53.59N, 01.25E], accidentally towed into British minefield laid in January; 2 officers and 15 ratings lost [He – all 16 crew lost], no survivors [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/go/ke/on]

C.31, submarine, 4 January 1915, North Sea - C-class, c290/320t, 1909, 218in tt with 4 torpedoes, 13/7.5kts, c16 crew, Pendant No. I.61, 4th Submarine Flotilla, Dover Patrol, Lt George Pilkington, sailed Dover 4th to investigate German naval activity off Zeebrugge, then report to Harwich on 7th, never heard from again, “overdue, presumed lost”. On or after 4th [ke - possiby 4th] - Lost off Belgium coast, cause unknown, possibly mined in German field off Zeebrugge or by accident, RNAS aircraft failed to observe any salvage operations off Zeebrugge that may have been connected with her loss, Cdre Keyes went out night of the 9th/10th with destroyers Lurcher and Firedrake in the forelorn hope of finding her. Declared lost on the 7th; 3 officers and 14 ratings lost, no survivors [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bs/bw/dk/dq/dx/ke/on]

C.33, submarine, 4 August 1915, North Sea - C-class, 290/320t, 1910, 218in tt with 4 torpedoes, 13/7.5kts, c16 crew, Pendant No. I.63, Rosyth-based 7th Flotilla, Lt Gerald Carter. Trawler Weelsby, renamed Malta for decoy purposes, left Harwich on 31 July to meet up with C.33 for anti-U-boat patrol off the Norfolk coast, but failed to repeat the earlier successes of C.24 and C.27. At 2015 on the 4th, C.33 slipped her tow to return to harbour independently, last signal at 2150 - "have nothing to communicate", then failed to arrive, “overdue, presumed lost”. [Declared lost on the 5th] - Lost, cause unknown, no wreckage found, probably mined in British field near Smith’s Knoll, alternatively an accident as no German claims were made for her sinking; 3 officers and 14 ratings lost, no survivors. Destroyer Firedrake sailed at dawn on the 5th but failed to find any trace of her, declared lost [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/ke/on]

CAMBRIDGE, paddle minesweeper – see LADY ISMAY, paddle minesweeper, 21 December 1915, North Sea

CAMEO, hired trawler, July 1915, North Sea - 172grt, built 1898, Hull-reg, hired 2/15, 1-12pdr [ap - 3pdr], Skipper Albert Sayers, on patrol with trawlers Sea Ranger and Eastward Ho!, all Peterhead-based. July - Cameo sighted U-boat, headed in its direction and was fired at, returned fire and hit three times, Eastward Ho! came up and submarine headed away on the surface; skipper wounded and awarded DSC, gunner the DSM [D/ap]

CANOPUS [01], battleship – see BATTLE OF CORONEL, 1 November 1914, South East Pacific.

CANOPUS [02], battleship – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914.

CANOPUS [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 2 March 1915, Third Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

CANOPUS [04], battleship – see MANX HERO, Admiralty trawler, 10 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign.

CANOPUS [05], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

CANOPUS [06], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

CANOPUS [07], battleship – see ALBION, battleship, 22 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

CANOPUS [08], battleship – see TRIUMPH, battleship, 25 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

CAPE ANTIBES, Admiralty collier, 21 October 1915, Barents Sea - 2,549grt, built 1903, Greenock-reg, Cape Antibes SS Lyle, Barry/Greenock for Archangel with coal. Mined, presumably laid by German Meteor, sank at entrance to White Sea [L - in 67.35N, 41.16E]; 6 crew lost [H/L/Lr]

CARIBBEAN [01], armed merchant cruiser, North Atlantic, February 1915 - one of two armed merchant cruisers of 10th CS on Northern Patrol damaged in the winter gales, dates not known, possibly February. 5,824grt, built 1890, hired 19/11/14, 8-4.7in/2-6pdr, normally on line B, north of Shetlands, proving unsuitable, old and slow. Rolled in heavy weather up to 50º with gunwhale submerged, reported dynamo disabled and funnel shifted. See also TEUTONIC [Mn/D/bi]

CARIBBEAN [02], armed merchant cruiser, possibly March 1915, off NW & W Scotland - Caribbean, 5,824grt, built 1890 and Colombella, 8,292grt, built 1902, hired c19/11/14, 10th CS Northern Patrol. Dates not known - Attacked by U-boat[s] around the time of the attacks on Ambrose and Digby, escaped. See DIGBY [D/ss]

CARIBBEAN [03], accommodation ship, 27 September 1915, off N Scotland - ex-passenger ship, 5,820grt, built 1890, Royal Mail Steam Packet Co, London-reg, hired 19/11/14 as armed merchant cruiser, accommodation ship 6/15, now fitted out as receiving ship for dockyard workmen, Cdr Henry Bethune in command, sailed from Liverpool on passage for Scapa Flow in “extremely heavy weather”. Shipped a lot of water and got into difficulties off Cape Wrath, sent out SOS in the afternoon of the 26th, light cruiser Birkenhead and tugs came out from Scapa and tried to tow her to safety, foundered around 0730 on the 27th [He - in 58.14N 05.42W]; most of crew taken off early hours of 27th, but 15 lives lost - 6 ratings, 7 MN and 2 canteen staff [Lr/C/Cn/D/He/bi/wd/dk; ADM.156/16]

CARILON, hired trawler, 24 December 1915, North Sea - 226grt, built 1915, Grimsby-reg GY692, hired 11/15 as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.21, Dover Patrol, Skipper William Reuben Francis RNR. Sweeping near Elbow buoy off North Foreland, mined in field laid by UC.1 [Egon von Werner] off Kent the day before and badly damaged [He – vessel Actaeon, type not identified, closed to take her in tow], foundered near Margate [He – last noted position 51.24.25N, 01.30.12E; wi - 51.23.26N, 01.31.18E]; no lives lost [H/L/C/D/He/dk/dq/un/wi; ADM.137/189]

CARMANIA, armed merchant cruiser, 14 September 1914, Central Atlantic, Carmania V Cap Trafalgar - ex-passenger ship, 19,524grt, built 1905, Cunard SS Co, Liverpool, hired 8/8/14, 8-4.7in, Capt N Grant, South American Station, taking part in southerly sweep for German raiders, coming down from NE at 16kts to examine Trinidada Island. Discovered Cap Trafalgar [2-4in/6 pom-poms] coaling from two colliers. German made off southwards while colliers dispersed, but then turned west and began to close at 18kts, range down to 8,500yds by 1210, Carmania fired a shot across the bows, Cap Trafalgar replied, and when only 7,500yds apart both ships opened rapid accurate fire. Range continued to shorten until Cap Trafalgar could use short-range pom-poms, Carmania turned away full circle until she was chasing, by which time her bridge was on fire, but the German was also on fire forward with a slight list. As a stern chase developed Cap Trafalgar slowly pulled away and by 1330 was out of range, but the fire was gaining and list increasing. Fifteen minutes later she capsized and sank in 20.10S, 29.51W. Carmania was badly damaged with five holes on the water line and fore-bridges destroyed, fires came under control, made for Abrolhos Rocks, met next afternoon in response to her SOS by light cruiser Bristol which stood by until arrival of cruiser Cornwall; 6 men killed, 3 DOW, 26 wounded. Royal Navy Single Ship Action - Carmania v CAP TRAFALGAR 1914 [Rn/Cn/D/dk/kp].

CARNARVON [01], cruiser – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914. Devonshire-class, 10,850t, 4-7.5in/6-6in/2-18in tt. Engaged in action with Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, no reported hits; no killed or wounded. See also CORNWALL, GLASGOW, INFLEXIBLE, INVINCIBLE, KENT [Rn/D/dk/nb/nh]

CARNARVON [02], cruiser, 22 February 1915, Central Atlantic - Devonshire-class, 10,850t, flag, Rear-Adm Stoddart, searching South American waters for light cruiser Karlsruhe and raider Kronprinz Wilhelm. Left Abrolhos Rock anchorage, shortly after weighing she hit uncharted shoal and ripped 95ft of bottom plating, beached and out of action, patched and sent into Rio de Janeiro where repairs were allowed because she had "suffered peril of the sea". Flag transferred to cruiser Vindictive [Rn/Cn/D/gr]

CARRIGAN HEAD, mercantile fleet auxiliary – see TB.046, torpedo boat, 21 December 1915, Aegean Sea

CAUCASIAN, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 1 July 1915, Atlantic off SW England – one of two auxiliaries captured and sunk by U.39 [Walter Forstmann] off Cornwall. 4,656grt, built 1899, Petroleum SS Co [Lane & Macandrew], London-reg, Mr F Robinson, London for New Orleans with creosote. Sunk by gunfire 80 miles S of Lizard Point [L - 60 miles SW of]. See also INGLEMOOR [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un]

CHALLENGER [01], light cruiser – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

CHALLENGER [02], light cruiser 27 September 1914, West African Campaign - Allied forces captured Duala, Cameroons; light cruiser Challenger, gunboat Dwarf, Niger Flotilla gunboats Ivy, Porpoise, Remus took part.

CHALLENGER [03], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

CHAR, Admiralty screw tug, 16 January 1915, Dover Straits - 149grt, built 1899, North Eastern Railway Co, West Hartlepool-reg, hired 17/11/14 as ABS, patrol and inspection tug in The Downs, Lt John Whale RNR, failed to answer radio signals from 16th, went missing. Run down at 0100 “in very rough conditions” by SS Erivan, sank between Deal and Goodwin Sands [wi - near North Goodwin buoy in 51.17.15N, 01.29.45E], wreck found with masts above water; 3 officers, 8 ratings and 7 MMR lost, no survivors [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/gs/wi; ADM.1/8409/18]

CHARITY, hired drifter, 24 October 1915, off English coast - 102grt, built 1901, Inverness-reg INS40, hired 1914 [D - 10/15; He - 1915] as net drifter, Skipper John Bruce RNR, sailed from Great Yarmouth that day for Poole to be fitted out for duties. Disappeared on passage, possibly mined; 1 officer and 7 ratings lost, all on board [H/C/D/He/dk; ADM.1/8441/347]

CHARYBDIS, light cruiser, 9 January 1915, North Atlantic - Astraea-class, 4,360t, 12th CS, operating in South Western Approaches in 1914. Damaged in collision presumably in Atlantic. Laid up at Bermuda, commissioned for harbour service in 1917, converted to cargo carrier March 1918 for mercantile operation [Rn/Cn/D]

CHATHAM [01], light cruiser, October 1914, Indian Ocean - Chatham-class, 6,000t, 2nd LCS in Mediterranean prewar, later to East African waters. October - Ran aground on Leven Rocks, near Kilindini, Kenya, towed off by SS Clan MacRae [Cn/D/gr/www]

CHATHAM [02], light cruiser, 31 October 1914, German East Africa Campaign – German light cruiser Koenigsberg located in Rufuji River delta by HMS Chatham.

CHATHAM [03], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

CHEERFUL, destroyer, 26 September 1914, North Sea - C-class, with patrol or local defence flotilla. Two torpedoes fired at her 3 miles W of Fidra island, in Firth of Forth [Mn/D/gf]

CHELMER [01], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows; also OCEAN, battleship.

CHELMER [02], destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

CHELMER [03], destroyer – see TRIUMPH, battleship, 25 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

CHERBURY, Admiralty collier, 29 April 1915, Atlantic off W Ireland - Another Grand Fleet supply ship, this time lost off the Irish coast. 3,220grt, built 1911, Cherbury SS Co [T L Duff & Co], Glasgow-reg, 25 crew, Mr James Davidson, Barry south-about Ireland for Cromarty with 5,100t coal. Submarine sighted 4 miles off at 1900, 10min later as Cherbury continued to zig-zag three shells fired, after another 10 to 12 miles a torpedo was fired and missed, then U.30 [Kurt Wippern] came up to within 150yd and signalled abandon ship, Cherbury hove to and complied. A party of Germans boarded, took the ship’s papers and navigational equipment, placed three scuttling charges below, sinking her around 2025, 27 miles WNW of Eagle Is, off Co Mayo [L - 13 miles NNW of; wi - in 54.21N, 10.18W]; crew rowed to Eagle Is LH, next morning proceeded to Scotsport and Belmullet. Note: “Wreck Index” describes the first sighting of the U-boat as 27 miles WNW of Eagle Is, followed by a 10 to 12 miles chase [H/L/Lr/Mn/Rn/te/un/wi]

CHICKLADE, Admiralty blockship, 2,410grt, built 1888, 299ft, W Coupland, West Hartlepool-reg . Purchased 1914/15 for Sunderland, Durham - final scuttling location not known [Lr/D]

CHILDERS, whaler – see MERSEY, monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa

CHIRSIT, hired trawler – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

CHRISTOPHER, destroyer, 23 September 1915, North Sea - K-class, 1,300t, 4th DF Grand Fleet. In collision with armed boarding vessel King Orry 1,877grt in fog, Christopher damaged [D/Cn/gf/gr]

CHURSTON, Admiralty collier, 3 September 1915, North Sea - 2,470grt, built 1914, Wilton SS Co, Dartmouth-reg, Mr W Martin, from Cardiff with 2,310t Welsh coal. Mined at 0850, laid by UC.7 [Franz Wäger], tugs attempted to take her in tow but weather too bad, finally sank at 1300, 2 1/2 m S of Orford Ness [W/te - in 52.01N, 01.38E]; four crew lost, survivors picked up by naval patrol vessel [H/L/Lr/sc/te/un/wi]

CITY OF DUNDEE, hired trawler, 14 September 1915, Dover Straits - 269grt, built 1914, Fleetwood-reg FD4, T F Kelsall, hired 11/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.678, Lt Albert Coles DSC RNR, Dover Patrol. In collision with Dutch steamship Patroclus, nearly cut in two and began to sink at once, going down off Folkestone, Kent at 1900; Warrant Officer and 6 ratings lost, Lt Coles was on the upper bridge at the time, became entangled in signal halliards and nearly pulled down, reached the surface, swam to a raft and pulled on board three other men, survivors picked up after hour and a half in the water [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/ft/sc; ADM.137/151]

CLACTON BELLE, paddle minesweeper – see DUCHESS OF HAMILTON, paddle minesweeper, 29 November 1915, North Sea

CLAN MACNAUGHTON, armed merchant cruiser, 3 February 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland - ex-passenger ship, 4,985grt, built 1911, 14kts, Cayzer, Irvine/Clan Line, Glasgow-reg, hired 19/11/14, 8-4.7in, Pendant No. M.81, 10th CS Grand Fleet, 261 crew, Cdr Robert Jeffreys i/c, master, Lt George Weldrick RNR, sailed from Liverpool on 23 January. On Northern Patrol line D to NNW of St Kilda, heavy SW gale on 2nd, "one of the worst the Tenth Cruiser Squadron experienced during the whole war", 10th CS ships lying to with heavy seas sweeping over them, all ships except Clan Macnaughton answered signals on morning of 3rd, went missing. Night of 2nd/3rd [usually listed as 3rd] - Believed foundered off Hebrides [Mn/C/Cn/D/ke - presumed mined; Mn - in 58.47N, 09.27W], Digby, Hildebrand, Patuca spent a week searching but only found some wreckage [He - in the area of 60.25N 09.37W], ship considered stable and seaworthy but floating mines, probably Berlin's, reported in the area, possibly hit one during the gale; 277 lives lost – 20 officers, 190 ratings and 67 MN [bi – 284 lives, ke - 261]. Contrary to other sources, Hepper reports there were concerns about her stability [H/J/Rn/Mn/C/Cn/D/He/bi/dk/gf/ke/ss; ADM.116/1441]

CLEMENTINA, Admiralty yacht, 5 August 1915, Atlantic off W Ireland - 469grt, built 1887, hired 22/9/14, 2-6pdr, Pendant No. 025, Examination Service, Capt Thomas Walker [retired Vice Admiral]. Closing the SS Adam Smith [299grt] for examination off Tor Cor Point [C/D - off Tor Point] in the early morning, in collision, holed, and flooded from the stokehold aft. To prevent her sinking, run aground and beached nearby. Salvage was abandoned, sold for breaking-up where she lay; no lives lost at this time, but an Assistant Engineer RNR died on 20 September 1915 possibly from injuries sustained. Note: location is confirmed as South Tor Cor or Torcor Point, Co Galway [H/J/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/143]

CLEON, hired trawler, 10 August 1915, Dover Straits - Cleon, 266grt, built 1907, hired 5/15 and Equinox, 198grt, built 1899, hired 6/15 both Grimsby-reg Admiralty hired trawlers, at anchor close together in Dover Harbour. Zeppelin dropped bombs just after midnight, Cleon damaged, one landed near Equinox, exploded in water, funnel and sides riddled with shrapnel; three Equinox crew asleep in their bunks below were wounded; one rating died of wounds [dp - four asleep, two ratings killed outright, one dangerously wounded but recovered] [Mn/D/dp]

CLIO, Admiralty blockship, 2,733grt, built 1889, 300ft, T Wilson & Sons, Hull-reg. Purchased 1914 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1914 in No.4 Barrier, in middle of Water Sound, between South Ronaldshay & Burray islands [wi - in 58.50.15N, 02.54.15W] [Lr/D/wi]

CLIO [01], sloop – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

CLIO [02], sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - British-Indian forces advancing up the River Tigris from Kurnah/Al Qurnah captured Amara [note: not Kut al Imara/Amara or just Kut], sloops Clio, Espiegle, and Odin, troopship Lawrence [RIM], armed tug Comet, armed launches Lewis Pelly, Miner, Shaitan, Sumana and stern wheelers Muzaffari/Mozaffir, Shushan took part [dx]

CLIO [03], sloop – see COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 28 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

COCKATRICE, destroyer, 11 December 1914, northern British waters - K-class, c1,300t, 4th DF Grand Fleet, on patrol in "very bad" weather. Unable to maintain station, with other destroyers forced to run for shelter, "suffered some"/"badly" damaged [D/gf/gr]

COLNE [01], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows; also OCEAN, battleship.

COLNE [02], destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

COLUMBELLA [01], armed merchant cruiser – see CARIBBEAN, armed merchant cruiser, possibly March 1915, off NW & W Scotland

COLUMBELLA [02], armed merchant cruiser, 22 July 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland - 10th CS. Attacked by U.36 [Ernst Graeff], off Hoy Head, SW Orkneys [Mn - in 60.26N, 04.42W] [Rn/Mn/ge]

COLUMBIA, hired trawler – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

COMBE, Admiralty ammunition carrier, 14 October 1915, Northern European Waters - 2,030grt, built 1912, London-reg, Stephenson Clarke, hired 1915, sailed Liverpool 12th for Archangel with Admiralty cargo, parted from escort 14th, went missing, posted by Lloyds 29/12/15. After 14th - Lost in northern British, Norwegian or Russian waters [H/L/Lr/C]

COMET [01], armed paddle launch-tug – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 21 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

COMET [02], armed paddle launch-tug – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

COMET [03], armed paddle launch-tug, 27 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - First Battle of Kut/Kut al Imara/Amara on the River Tigris by British/Indian forces advancing from Amara, taken on 28th. Armed paddle launch-tug Comet, and armed launches Shaitan, Sumana took part [dx]

COMET [04], armed paddle launch-tug, 28 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign [Victoria Cross ship] - 144t. Only a boom which included a dhow and two iron barges at the centre appeared to prevent the final capture of Kut. Comet [Lt-Cdr Cookson, on the books of sloop Clio], Shaitan and Sumana steamed up under heavy rifle and machine gun fire, Comet went ahead to ram the dhow, failed to break through, gunfire also failed, Lt-Cdr Cookson jumped onto the dhow with an axe to try to cut the wire hawsers securing her, was riddled with bullets from close-range and killed, no other lives lost. The gunboats sank the dhow with gunfire and all retired. Early next day, the Turks had gone, the boom was dismantled and Kut occupied. Lt-Cdr Edgar Christopher Cookson DSO was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross [Rn/D/dk/vc]

COMET [05], armed paddle launch-tug, 30 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - Shaitan and Sumana, launches, both armed with 3pdrs, with Comet continued to chase the retreating Turks north from Kut up the increasingly shoaling River Tigris. By the 30th Shaitan was fast aground near Kut and Sumana had broken both rudders by grounding, only Comet remained in action [D/Rn]

COMET [06], armed paddle launch-tug – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 22 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

COMET [07], armed paddle launch-tug – see SHAITAN, armed launch, 28 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

COMET [08], armed paddle launch-tug – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 1 December 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

COMET [01], destroyer, 23 August 1914, probably North Sea - H-class, 970t, 2nd DF Grand Fleet. In collision in fog with sister-ship Rifleman, Comet "considerably damaged"; no lives lost [D/df/dk/gr]

COMET [02], destroyer, 6 May 1915, North Sea - Two sorties towards the German coast were thwarted by dense fog and resultant collisions involving three destroyers: Comet and Nemesis, H-class, 970t, 2nd DF Grand Fleet, two of eight destroyers escorting minelayer Orvieto from Scapa into Heligoland Bight. In collision, Nemesis "seriously damaged"; no casualties [D/gf/gr]; Lennox, L-class, c1,300t, 3rd DF, with Harwich Force of light cruisers and destroyers escorting seaplane carriers for attempted raid, fog so thick twice had to anchor. Lennox rammed by one of the carriers and Force recalled; no casualties [D/ty]

CONDOR, hired trawler, 22 November 1914, North Sea - [C - Condor II] 227grt, built 1905, Thos Baskcomb, Grimsby-reg GY85, hired 11/14, 1-6pdr. Wrecked off Lowestoft, Suffolk [wi - in 52.29N, 01.48E; D - mined or foundered off Lowestoft; C - in Firth of Forth]; no lives lost. Note: “Wreck Index” states that the original source for the Forth loss position “is incorrect”. Hepper identifies her as taken up for service as a patrol vessel, but had not been fitted out [hence no 6pdr gun presumably]. Stranded off Lowestoft on Newcome Sands at 1050 in strong easterly gale, crew taken off by local lifeboat an hour later, and vessel abandoned as wreck. Note: she was probably lost in the same situation and around the same time as HMT Spider above [H/Lr/C/D/bm/dk/wi; ADM.137/76]

CONFLICT, destroyer – see VELOX, destroyer, 25 October 1915, English Channel

CONQUEROR [01], dreadnought – see MONARCH, dreadnought, 27 December 1914, North Sea.

CONQUEROR [02], dreadnought, 15 December 1914, Orkneys - expecting a German raid somewhere along the East coast of England through the intelligence work of Room 40 [the Yorkshire Raid next day], the Admiralty ordered 2nd BS and 1st LCS from Scapa Flow, Adm Beatty's 1st BCS and available destroyers from Cromarty, and 3rd CS from Rosyth to rendezvous and sweep south, heavy seas were encountered: Conqueror, dreadnought, 2nd BS. Lost 3 ratings, swept overboard [dk/gf]; Boadicea and Blanche, light cruisers, Boadicea-class, 3,800t, attached to Grand Fleet battle squadrons, sailed with 2nd BS early in the day. Boadicea's bridge carried away by the seas in Pentland Firth, reportedly several men swept overboard and drowned, forced to return and sent to Clyde for repairs, Blanche less seriously damaged and repaired at Scapa; no lives listed as lost [Rn/Cn/D/dk/gf/gr]

CORCYRA, hired trawler, 20 February 1915, North Sea - 225grt, built 1914, Grimsby-reg GY63, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.278, Skipper Leonard Shenton RNR. Stranded [H - wrecked] near Bacton, Norfolk; no lives lost. Later salved, but not taken back into Naval service, in Fishery Reserve, listed until 1919, served again in WW2 [H/C/D/He/dk]

CORNWALL [01], cruiser - CARMANIA, armed merchant cruiser, 14 September 1914, Central Atlantic,

CORNWALL [02], cruiser – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914. Kent-class, 9,800t, 14-6in/10-12pdr/2-18in tt, Capt Ellerton. In action with Leipzig, hit 18 times, two bunkers flooded, listed to port; no killed or wounded. See also CARNARVON, GLASGOW, INFLEXIBLE, INVINCIBLE, KENT [Rn/D/dk/nb/nh]

CORNWALLIS [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

CORNWALLIS [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

CORNWALLIS [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

CORNWALLIS [04], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 2 March 1915, Third Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

CORNWALLIS [05], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

CORNWALLIS [06], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

CORNWALLIS [07], battleship – see GOLIATH, battleship, 13 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

CRAIGSTON, Admiralty collier, 4 October 1915, Central Mediterranean - 2,617grt, built 1911, Cardiff-reg, Seville & United Kingdom, Cardiff for Mudros with coal. Captured by U.33 [Konrad Gansser], sunk by gunfire 35 miles W of Ovo Is, N of Cape St John, NE Crete [H/L/Lr/te/un]

CRATHIE , hired trawler, 27 August 1914, North Sea - [C - Craithie], one of two hired trawlers mined in Tyne field laid by German Albatros. 210grt, built 1911, Caledonian Steam Trawling, Aberdeen-reg A350, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, unarmed, Admiralty No.106, Skipper Herbert Henry Cook RNR, with same minesweeping force. Two mines snagged in her sweep wires in the afternoon without incident, but at 1706 a third mine exploded under her. Sank rapidly [wi - in 55.01N, 01.22W]; 2 ratings lost in explosion. See also German Minelaying Raid on English East Coast - 25th/26th August 1914, and THOMAS W IRVIN [H/L/C/D/He/ap/dk/sc/wi; ADM.137/1002]

CRESCENT [01], light cruiser – see HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea

CRESCENT [02], light cruiser, 11 November 1914, North Atlantic off Northern Scotland - Crescent [flag, Adm de Chair] and Edgar, old 1st-class light cruisers, Edgar-class, 7,350t, 10th CS on Northern Patrol, steaming to SW of Foula Island to watch Fair Isle Channel for two reported minelayers, encountered full westerly gale with high and breaking seas, ordered to return to Scapa Flow but impossible to turn ship without risk of capsizing. Crescent lost boats and deck fittings, deck and sides began to give and open up, fires in foremost boiler put out by rising water, bridge smashed and Admirals sea cabin swept overboard, big gun broke loose in after turret and only stopped by filling the turret with hammocks. Edgar similarly damaged. Adm de Chair described it as "quite the most appalling gale I ever experienced in all my years at sea" and did not expect to survive; Edgar lost one man overboard. Half of the 10th CS sent to Clyde for refits, but inspections were so unfavourable all seven "Edgar's" of the 10th old Training Squadron paid off on 20th to be replaced by converted liners - armed merchant cruisers [Cn/D/dk/ss]

CRESSINGTON COURT, collier [not known if Admiralty chartered] – see PRINCESS VICTORIA, hired trawler, 7 November 1915, Atlantic off NW France

CRESSY, cruiser – see 22 September 1914, Sinking of Cruisers Aboukir, Hogue, Cressy by U.9, North Sea. Built 1899, Pendant No. N.40, Capt Robert Johnson. Although now aware that one or more submarines were in the area, Cressy stopped to rescue the men from Aboukir and Hogue, boats now returning to her, sent off warning signals to Admiralty at 0717, periscope sighted, ordered full speed ahead but one torpedo hit abreast after funnel and a second just before the after bridge, ship also turned over on her beam ends, lay awash for 15min and went down; 563 lives lost - 25 officers including CO, 535 ratings and 3 canteen staff. See also ABOUKIR, HOGUE [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ge/ke/ty; ADM.137/47]

CROCODILE, locally converted to gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

CRUSADER, destroyer - see MAORI, destroyer, 7 May 1915, Belgian Coast

CUMBERLAND [01], cruiser, 28 August 1914, West African Campaign - Cumberland and gunboat Dwarf arrived off Lome, German Togoland at start of naval operations.

CUMBERLAND [02], cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa - naval operations started against Duala, Cameroons, with cruiser Cumberland, old light cruiser Challenger, gunboat Dwarf, local converted gunboats of the Niger Flotilla - Alligator, Balbus, Crocodile, Ivy, Moseley [believed Mole], Porpoise, Remus, Vampire, Vigilant, Walrus taking part. Royal Navy Battle Honour - CAMEROONS 1914

CYMBELINE, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 4 September 1915, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 4,505grt, built 1902, Bear Creek Oil & Shipping Co [C T Bowring & Co], Liverpool-reg, Port Arthur for Dartmouth with oil. Captured by U.33 [Konrad Gansser], then on passage for the Dardanelles, and sunk by torpedo 96 miles W by S of Fastnet Rock [H/te/un - also 29 miles W by S of; un – in 51.16N, 12.04W]; six crew lost [H/L/Mn/Lr/te/un]

CYNTHIA, destroyer – see TB.12, torpedo boat, 10 June 1915, North Sea


D

D.2, submarine, 25 November 1914, North Sea - D class, 489/603t, 1910, 112pdr/318in tt with 6 torpedoes, 14/9kts, c25 crew, Pendant No. I.72, Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, two days earlier on 23rd running on the surface in heavy seas, her commanding officer Lt-Cdr Jameson was washed overboard. Next day with replacement Lt-Cdr Clement Head in command, D.2 sailed for patrol off Borkum island, Ems estuary, nothing more heard from her, “overdue, presumed lost”. On or around 25th [ke - possibly 25th; J - 1 December] - Lost, cause unknown, perhaps mined or accident [C/Cn/D/bw/dx - may have been sunk by gunfire of German torpedo boat or patrol craft off Western Ems on 25th]; 4 officers and 22 ratings lost [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bs/bw/dk/dx/ke/on]

D.5, submarine – see FIRST BOMBARDMENT OF BRITISH COAST, RAID ON GORLESTON, 3 November 1914

D.6, submarine – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

DAHLIA, fleet sweeping sloop, 4 September 1915, North Sea - Acacia-class, 1,200t, 2-12pdr/2-3pdr, Grand Fleet minesweeping flotilla, Lt G Parsons, sweeping Meteor-laid field in Cromarty Firth. [Rn - 2nd] - Mined and very badly damaged, bows blown off but ship saved and repaired; 3 ratings killed, one missing and one died of wounds, Lt Parsons severely injured [Rn/Cn/D/dk/gf/sc]

DANE, hired trawler, 28 August 1915, North Sea - 265grt, built 1913, 'D' Line Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY947, hired 4/15 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.1446, believed Harwich-based, Lt Parker RNR. Mined at 0750, laid by UC.6 [Matthias Graf von Schmettow], sank about 1 mile NW of North Aldeburgh Napes buoy, off Suffolk [wi - 2 1/2 m ESE of Thorpe Ness, in 52.10.08N, 01.41.06E]; 4 ratings lost and 1 more DOW [wi - 8 killed] [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8431/251]

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [01], 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts – In January 1915, the Russians asked the Allies to take Turkish pressure off their forces in the Caucasus. First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill gained support of the War Council for a naval attack on the Dardanelles. By the end of January [28th - British Government agreed to naval attack], Admiralty directed to bombard and take Gallipoli with Constantinople as its objective, but no troops were to be made available.

VENGEANCE, battleship, Canopus-class, 14,300t, 4-12in/12-6in/12-12pdr/4-18in tt, 8th BS Channel Fleet 8/14, later to Mediterranean. The bombardment of the defences around Cape Helles on the European side and Kum Kale/Orkanie on the Asiatic was initially carried out by battlecruiser Inflexible [flag, Adm Carden, C-in-C], battleships Albion, Cornwallis, Triumph, the French Suffren [French flag] and Bouvet, supported by French Suffren and light cruiser Amethyst. Vengeance [division flag, Adm de Robeck] observed for her division, and the force was later joined by dreadnought Queen Elizabeth and battleship Agamemnon. Vengeance fired at and was fired on by Orkanie batteries on Asiatic side, not hit but spars and rigging damaged by four near misses, CORNWALLIS was slightly less damaged. A second planned bombardment on the 20th to complete the destruction of the outer forts was cancelled because of gale-force conditions, accurate gunlaying was not possible and spotting aircraft could not fly. The bad weather continued until the 25th. Royal Navy Battle Honour - DARDANELLES 1915-16, to 8 January 1916 [Rn/Cn/D]

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [02], 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts – the second bombardment resumed after delays due to bad weather. Runs were made by battleships Vengeance and Cornwallis, French Suffren and Charlemagne, supported by anchored dreadnought Queen Elizabeth, battleships Agamemnon, Irresistible and French Gaulois. Fired was opened around around 1015, but within a short time, Agamemnon was hit:

AGAMEMNON, battleship, Lord Nelson-class, 17,680t, 4-12in/10-9.2in/24-12pdr/5-18in tt, 5th BS Channel Fleet 8/14, later to Mediterranean, anchored about 2 1/2 m WSW of Cape Yeni Shehr on Asiatic side. Cape Helles batteries opened fire at 1017 at 10,000yds and straddled her after 15min, ordered to weigh but within 10min hit by seven armour piercing shells, most of which broke up, but holed above waterline, hydraulic engine and main derrick damaged; 3 ratings killed, one DOW and four seriously injured. Cleared up wreckage, continued in action and repaired damage off Tenedos next day [Rn/Cn/D/da/dk].

By 1500 the outer batteries had been practically silenced by the Anglo-French ships. Minesweeping trawlers escorted by destroyers and covered by battleships Vengeance, Albion and Triumph then started sweeping the entrance. At 1600 the rest of the fleet retired to Tenedos. By 2000 the sweepers had penetrated four miles without finding any mines.

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [03], 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued - Battleships Albion, Triumph and Majestic entered the Straits at 0800 to complete the destruction of the entrance forts and to attack the defences further inside, Albion along the European or north shore, Majestic along the Asiatic or south. Both soon came under fire which they returned, but as the day progressed the fixed shore guns were joined by concealed and mobile howitzer and field gun batteries and only by constantly shifting their positions could the two battleships avoid serious damage, that is until Majestic was hit. They were recalled at 1600:

MAJESTIC, battleship, Majestic-class, c16,000t, 4-12in/12-6in/18-12pdr/5-18in tt, 7th BS Channel Fleet 8/14, later to Mediterranean, now with howitzer mounted on each of her turrets. Holed below waterline and leaking [Rn/Cn/D/da/vc]. Before then, at 1430, Royal Marine covering and Royal Navy demolition parties were landed near the entrance forts to complete their destruction, men from Irresistible on the European side, and from Vengeance on the Asiatic side covered by battleship Cornwallis, light cruiser Dublin and destroyers Racoon and Basilisk. The missions were successfully carried out with some casualties; Lt-Cdr Eric Gascoigne Robinson who led the Vengeance demolition party was awarded the Victoria Cross for his gallantry under fire. He later took part in the successful destruction of stranded submarine E.15.

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [04], 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued - battleships ALBION and OCEAN, Canopus-class, 14,300t, 4-12in/12-6in, TRIUMPH, Swiftsure-class, 11,985t, 4-10in/14-7.5in, and MAJESTIC, Majestic-class, c16,060t, 4-12in/12-6in, taking part in the second attack within the Dardanelles after more delays due to the weather. Albion and Triumph to engage Fort Dardanos, Ocean and Majestic to search for mobile guns. All ships engaged by concealed guns, continually hit sometimes by 4in howitzers but not seriously; 1 officer and 4 men in Albion injured by splinters [Rn/Cn/D/da]

That night the trawlers started sweeping towards Kephez Point, escorted by destroyers Basilisk, Grasshopper, Racoon and Mosquito supported by light cruiser Amethyst. Just short of the first line of mines at 2300 they were illuminated by searchlights, subjected to heavy fire by the minefield protection guns, and forced to withdraw under cover of the supporting ships.

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [05], 2 March 1915, Third Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts - battleships CANOPUS, Canopus-class, 14,300t, 4-12in/12-6in, CORNWALLIS, Duncan-class, c15,000t, 4-12in/12-6in and SWIFTSURE, Swiftsure-class, 11,800, 4-10in/14-7.5in, taking part in third attack within the Straits. Opened fire on Fort Dardanos at 1420 which did not reply until 1615 but immediately straddled the ships. Canopus hit on quarter-deck wrecking wardroom, another shell carried away main topmast, and a third went through after funnel and wrecked two boats, all ships received minor damage; one man slightly wounded. Weather remained bad making aerial reconnaissance impossible, and again that night the minesweeping trawlers were driven back. However further landings were made by beach and demolition parties around Cape Helles and Kum Kale on the 3rd and 4th [Rn/Cn/D/da]

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [06], 4 March 1915, Beach Party landings around Kum Kale - landings by beach and demolition parties around Kum Kale resulted in a number of Royal Navy and Royal Marine casualties, including two ratings killed from battleship Lord Nelson, one from battleship Ocean, and 23 Marines from the Plymouth Battalion of the Royal Naval Division. Others died of wounds [dk]. As of the 5th, Phase 1 of the campaign had been successful with the outer defences destroyed, beach and demolition parties landed, little damage to the bombarding ships, and few casualties. Now Adm Carden was ready for Phase 2 - sweeping the minefields, believed to consist of ten lines of mines starting 8 miles inside the entrance and reducing the gun and other defences right up to the Narrows. For the latter, naval forces included 14 British and 4 French capital ships and four British light cruisers, but the only minesweepers were eight slow trawlers.

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [07], 6 March 1915, Attack on the Narrows Forts - Queen Elizabeth continued indirect fire across the peninsula with Albion spotting, while Agamemnon and Lord Nelson entered the straits to carry out their attacks on the Narrows forts:

MAJESTIC, battleship, Majestic-class, covering Albion while she spotted. Hit by a heavy shell from Messudieh Fort [Rn/Cn/D];

AGAMEMNON and LORD NELSON, battleships, Lord Nelson-class, c17,700t, 4-12in/10-9.2in, nicknamed "Aggie" and "Nellie", covered by the French battleship division, opened fire about 1230 on the powerful Chanak forts. Agamemnon soon hit on armour by 6in shell, at 1300 on quarterdeck apparently by 14in shell which blew a great hole, wrecked the wardroom and gunroom and drove splinters through the foretop, followed by two more heavy shells. As both ships continued to come under intense fire from many batteries, both were hit several times from 1400 on, rigging and upper works damaged. Agamemnon hit by a total of 8 heavy shells, Lord Nelson by 7 including one which hit her armour below the waterline, flooded two bunkers and also sent splinters into her conning tower; Capt McClintock and two crew wounded by the splinters. Both ships returned to Tenedos, and next day Lord Nelson left for Mudros and the repair ships there [Rn/Cn/D/da]

DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN [08], 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows – [I] With Adm de Robeck now in command, an all out attack was launched against the Narrows defences by most of the 14 British and 4 French capital ships in three main groups. Ranging from the European side to the Asiatic in line abreast, these were:

Line A, 1st Division - Queen Elizabeth, Agamemnon, Lord Nelson, Inflexible to go in first to bombard and dominate the Narrows forts.

Line B, 3rd Division - French ships Gaulois, Charlemagne, Bouvet, Suffren to pass through Line A and engage the forts more closely, covered by Prince George on the European side and Triumph on the Asiatic.

2nd Division ships Vengeance, Irresistible, Albion, Ocean to relieve the French Line, and Majestic/Swiftsure to take over from Prince George/Triumph.

Canopus and Cornwallis were reserved for minesweeping cover that night.

[II] Line A was in action about 1130, came under fire from concealed guns and howitzers but not badly hit until Agamemnon and Inflexible began to suffer:

AGAMEMNON, battleship, Lord Nelson-class, 17,680t, 4-12in/10-9.2in. Between 1245 and 1310 hit at least 12 times by 6in howitzers from Eren Keui, five times on the armour without damage, seven times above it, with much structural damage, continued in operation [Rn/Cn/D/da/sm/tg];

INFLEXIBLE, battlecruiser, Invincible-class, 20,080t, 8-12in/16-4in. Also under fire from Eren Keui howitzers, hit on the bridge and wireless put out of action about 1220, hit three more times in the next 10min and picket boat alongside sunk, forebridge on fire and hit twice more, stayed on station to support the French; some men wounded [Rn/Cn/D];

QUEEN ELIZABETH, dreadnought, Queen Elizabeth-class, 31,500t, 8-15in/16-6in. Hit frequently on superstructure, not seriously damaged, continued in operation; few if any casualties [Rn/Cn/D/tg]

[III] French Line B with Prince George and Triumph passed through Line A at 1220, Suffren was badly damaged, Gaulois badly holed and had to be beached on Rabbit Island, then as Bouvet passed back through British Line A she blew up near the Asiatic shore around 1345, presumed at the time to have been hit in a magazine by a Turkish shell or possibly by shore torpedo.

[IV] The British 2nd Division ships proceeded to take the place of the retiring French, opening fire at 1439. At 1514 there was a heavy explosion alongside Irresistible from a heavy shell. Between 1530 and 1600 mines were reported where Bouvet went down. Shortly after and in an area far short of the Kephez lines of mines, Inflexible exploded one, then Irresistible and, after trying to tow Irresistible clear, Ocean detonated yet another nearly two hours later. Before then the general recall for all ships had been hoisted.

[V] MOSQUITO, RACOON, G-class, c1,100t and CHELMER, JED, KENNET, WEAR, E-class, c630t, destroyers taking part in rescue operations, all subjected to "terrific" enemy gunfire. Racoon damaged by the concussion of a large shell bursting under water, also by shrapnel bullets; all destroyers "sustained comparatively few casualties” [D/dd]

[VI] The loss of Bouvet, Irresistible, Ocean and near-fatal damage to Inflexible were all due to a line of just 20 mines laid in Eren Keui Bay parallel to the Asiatic shore by 365t auxiliary minelayer Nousret or Nusret. The final Allied attempt to break through to Constantinople by naval power alone was over in just one day, with three capital ships sunk and three out of action out of the 16 taking part. See also INFLEXIBLE, IRRESISTIBLE, OCEAN [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/da/dk/ke/mf]



DARTMOUTH [01], light cruiser – see ADJUTANT, patrol vessel, German East Africa , 6 February 1915

DARTMOUTH [02], light cruiser, 15 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - Weymouth-class, 5,800t, believed within Dardanelles. Boiler explosion [1 of 12 Yarrow-manufactured] totally wrecking a boiler room, moved and anchored astern of battleship Agamemnon off Tenedos at 1100; 4 killed, seven died of injuries. Back in action within Dardanelles by 17th/18th [Rn/D/da/dk]

DARTMOUTH [03], light cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

DARTMOUTH [04], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

DARTMOUTH [05], light cruiser, 29 December 1915, Adriatic Sea - Durazzo, Albania raided by Austrian naval forces to interfer with Serbian evacuation, brought to action by British-Italian force but escaped, British light cruisers Dartmouth, Weymouth took part, French submarine Monge and two Austrians destroyers sunk [dx]

DESABLA, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 12 June 1915, North Sea - 6,047grt, built 1913, Bank Line, Glasgow-reg [wi - Admiralty oiler transport No 63, presumably Y7.63], Mr F Cowley, Port Arthur for Hull with linseed/oil [wi - crude oil]. U.17 [Hans Walther] sighted astern overtaking rapidly, started shelling continuously from 0720, engines stopped and crew abandoned ship by 0820 during which time the U-boat stood-by. Torpedo fired at 0830, but as she refused to sink, a boarding party placed explosive scuttling charges, by 1230 the submarine had submerged and Desabla was sinking fast 12 miles E of Todhead Point, S of Stonehaven, Kincardine [L - 38 miles ENE of May Is, Firth of Forth; te - 15 miles E of; wi - 13.5 miles ESE of Stonehaven, in 56.54.54N, 01.47.18W]; survivors picked up by armed trawlers at 1530 [H/L/Lr/D/te/un/wi]

DEVONIA, paddle minesweeper – see BRIGHTON QUEEN, paddle minesweeper, 6 October 1915, Belgian Coast

DEVONSHIRE, cruiser – see BELLONA, light cruiser, 17 December 1914, North Sea

DEWSLAND, hired trawler – see SAMARA, Admiralty collier, 19 August 1915, Atlantic off SW England

DIAMOND, light cruiser – see FORMIDABLE, battleship, 1 January 1915, English Channel.

DIGBY [01], armed merchant cruiser – see CLAN MACNAUGHTON, armed merchant cruiser, 3 February 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland

DIGBY [02], armed merchant cruiser, 14 March 1915, off NW & W Scotland - 3,966grt, built 1913, hired 22/11/14 [later French Artois], 10th CS. [bi - 15th] - Held up in the Clyde because of attacks on Ambrose and Bayano, now heading for patrol area. Cleared North Channel, chased by U-boat off Skerryvore, took refuge in Tobermory Harbour, following day escorted out by destroyer and headed for patrol line. See CARIBBEAN [Mn/D/bi/ss]

DIGBY [03], armed merchant cruiser – see PATUCA, armed merchant cruiser, 1 July 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland

DOLORES, naval motor boat, 28 August 1915, Irish Sea - ex-high speed pleasure motor boat, 12grt, hired 1914, serving with Motor Boat Reserve as HM Motor Boat No.55 [number also used by motor boat Arabian], armed with rifles/small arms, manned by RNVR crew, SubLt Harold Bishop Mylchreest RNR in command. Caught fire, burnt to the waterline and sank alongside the quay in Douglas Harbour, Isle of Man [wi - in 54.08.45N, 04.28.05W]; no lives lost [H/D/He/dk/wi]

DOMINION, battleship, 10 May 1915, North Sea - King Edward VII-class, returning to Rosyth after cruise in northern North Sea with rest of 3rd BS, also 3rd CS, all Grand Fleet, divisions in line ahead, zigzagging at 15kts, had not yet met screening destroyers. [ge - 8th; Cn - May 1916] - unsuccessfully attacked by U.39 about 100 miles ENE of Firth of Forth, two torpedoes missed [Cn/D/gf/ge]

DON, Admiralty collier, 8 May 1915, North Sea - 939grt, built 1892, Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Co, Goole-reg, Mr W Adron, sailing Cromarty for Blyth in ballast. Captured by U.9 [Johannes Spiess], torpedoed and sank around 0440, 7 miles E of Coquet Isle, off Amble [wi - in 55.21N, 01.20W] [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

DONALDA, hired trawler – see PRINCESS VICTORIA, hired trawler, 7 November 1915, Atlantic off NW France

DOON, destroyer - see GERMAN RAID on HARTLEPOOL, SCARBOROUGH and WHITBY, 16 December 1914. E-class, 615t, 4-12pdr/2-18in tt, Lt-Cdr H Fraser. One rating killed and one DOW [Rn - 3 killed, 6 wounded]. See also PATROL [Rn/D/dk]

DORIS [01], light cruiser, 19 December 1914, Turkish Coastal Operations - independent harassing action near Alexandretta by Doris.

DORIS [02], light cruiser – see T.B. 064, torpedo boat, 21 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

DORIS [03], light cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

DORIS [04], light cruiser – see THESEUS, cruiser, 21 October 1915, Aegean Sea

DOROTHEA, naval motor boat, 21 July 1915, Eastern Mediterranean - ex-high speed pleasure motor boat, 33grt, 60ft, 11kts, hired 1914, serving with Motor Boat Reserve as HM Motor Boat No 203, 2-3pdrs, also rifles/small arms, manned by RNVR crew, reached Mudros around now as deck cargo, due to serve with flotilla of six motor boats carrying out local patrol duties off Turkish coast including Smyrna [Izmir] area, Lt Henry Holloway RNVR in command. Probably destroyed before she went into action, taking on fuel, spillage and explosion, burnt out; no lives lost [H/D/He/ap/dk; ADM.137/775]

DOROTHY GREY or GRAY, hired trawler – see GARRY, destroyer, 23 November 1914, North Sea.

DREADNOUGHT, dreadnought battleship, 18 March 1915, North Sea - Neptune, dreadnought, 1st BS, and Dreadnought, the first dreadnought battleship, 21,840t, 10-12in/27-12pdr, flagship 4th BS, both Grand Fleet, battle fleet and cruisers carried out "strategical exercise" in the early morning, then returned to their bases because of submarine warnings, 1st BS to Scapa, and 4th BS detached to Cromarty. Marlborough, flagship 1st BS reported sighting a periscope east of the Pentland Firth at 1218 and that a torpedo had passed just astern of Neptune. Around 1230 as 4th BS crossed under the stern of the rest of the battle fleet to head for Cromarty, Dreadnought sighted the periscope, altered course and rammed, sinking U.29 commanded by Lt-Cdr Otto Weddigen [dx - in 58.21N, 01.12E] who had sunk the three Cressy's and Hawke in U.9 [Cn/D/dx/gf]

DRUMOAK, hired trawler, 5 October 1914, North Sea - 208grt, built 1902, North of Scotland Steam Fishing, Aberdeen-reg A516, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, unarmed, Admiralty No.342, Skipper Robert Smith Ellington RNR. Believed mined and sunk [H/D/He - off Belgian coast; L/C/wi - off River Tyne estuary, in 55.01N, 01.22.45W]; Skipper and 9 ratings lost. Note: “Wreck Index“ refers to discrepencies in WW1 records which place her loss off the Tyne as well as the Belgian coast. [Hepper – one of two Admiralty minesweeping trawlers sweeping in company near the North Hinder lightship, off the Belgian coast, disappeared with all hands, believed mined and sunk. Neither vessel was seen to sink, but other ships in the area reported an explosion at 1930, followed 15 minutes by another, perhaps when the surviving sweeper went to the assistance of the first.] [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/3109]

DUBLIN [01], light cruiser – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

DUBLIN [02], light cruiser, 7 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - Chatham-class, 6,000t, 8-6in/4-3pdr/2-21in tt, in Gulf of Xeros/Saros, keeping watch off Bulair at the neck of Gallipoli peninsula. Hidden battery opened fire, hit four times, damage not serious [Rn/Cn/D]

DUBLIN [03], light cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

DUBLIN [04], light cruiser, 9 June 1915, Adriatic Sea - Chatham-class, 6,000t, 8-6in/4-3pdr/2-21in tt, based at Brindisi from 5/15, Capt Kelly, steaming at high speed with strong escort of French and Italian destroyers off N Albanian coast. Torpedoed by Austrian submarine U.IV [Rudolph Singule] near San Giovanni di Medua, soon worked up to 17kts, got back to Brindisi, but out of action for some time; 13 ratings lost [Rn/Cn/D/dk/ge/md/nw/un]

DUCHESS OF HAMILTON, paddle minesweeper, 29 November 1915, North Sea - ex-Clyde excursion steamer, 553grt, built 1890, Glasgow-reg, Caledonian Steam Packet, hired 3/15 [D - 11th], Pendant No. 933, Lt-Cdr Hugh Archer, sweeping with HMS Westward Ho, 19 miles SE of Harwich at N end of Black Deep. Mined at 1315, laid [He – possibly] by UC.3 [Erwin Wassner], sank near Galloper LV [J/dx/wi - off the Longsand, in 51.46.46N, 01.37.18E; He – 1 1/2 miles SW of Sunk Head buoy in Black Deep; te - in 51.47N, 01.40E]; 8 ratings, 1 MN lost, survivors picked up by paddle minesweeper Clacton Belle [H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/do/dk/dx/ge/te/un/wi; ADM.1/8441/348; ADM.137/140]

DUFFERIN [RIM], armed troopship – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

DUKE OF ALBANY, armed boarding vessel, 7 June 1915, Orkneys - 1,997grt, built 1907, hired 30/10/14, returning to Scapa in thick fog. Grounded on Lother Rock in the Pentland Firth at 0400, refloated with considerable damage seven days later [D/gf/gr]

DUKE OF CORNWALL, armed boarding vessel, 18 January 1915, North Sea - 1,528grt, built 1898, hired 31/10/14. Collided with and sank trawler Earl Marischal 206grt, 30 miles NE by N of Buchan Ness, one of the trawler crew was lost [D/gr]

DUKE OF EDINBURGH, cruiser 10 November 1914, Arabian Coastal Operations - British-Indian forces bombarded and stormed Sheikh Sa'id, southern Arabia and destroyed defences, Duke of Edinburgh & troops of 29th Indian Infantry Brigade took part. [dx]

DUPLEX [01], gunboat – see GOLIATH, battleship 28 November 1914, German East Africa Campaign

DUPLEX [02], gunboat – see FOX, light cruiser 12 January 1915, German East Africa Campaign.

DWARF [01], gunboat, 28 August 1914, West African Campaign - cruiser Cumberland and gunboat Dwarf arrived off Lome, German Togoland at start of naval operations. [dx_

DWARF [02], gunboat – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

DWARF [03], gunboat, 11 September 1914, Cameroons Campaign - Bramble-class, 710t, 2-4in/4-12pdr, West Africa Station, taking part in operations against Duala, Cdr F Strong. Opened fire on German launch towing a lighter on the Duala River estuary, shelled by two field guns at Yoss Point, returned fire and gained hits, but badly hit on the bridge; one rating died of wounds [Rn/D/dk]

DWARF [04], gunboat, 15 September 1914, Cameroons Campaign - Bramble-class, 710t, 2-4in/4-12pdr. Spotted attack by German launch armed with bow torpedo in Duala estuary, opened fire, man in charge lashed wheel in the wrong position, crashed into bank and exploded [Rn/D]

DWARF [05], gunboat, 16 September 1914, Cameroons Campaign - Bramble-class, 710t, 2-4in/4-12pdr, at anchor at night. Attacked by German armed steamer Nachtigal in Bimbia River, Dwarf fired at point-blank range but was rammed, as the vessels separated Nachtigal was in flames and sank. Dwarf badly holed, but soon repaired and back in service [Rn/D/dx]

DWARF [06], gunboat – see CHALLENGER, light cruiser 27 September 1914, West African Campaign.

DYLE, Admiralty blockship, 1,510grt, built 1879, 260ft, Schaldis SS of Belgium, Antwerp-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, final location not known, possibly not Scapa Flow. Note: Internet diving sites only list World War 2 blockship Doyle, 1,761grt, built 1907 that was scuttled in Burra Sound between Hoy & Graemsay islands [Lr/D]


E

E.1 [01], submarine, 17 October 1914, Baltic Operations - submarines E.1 [17th, Laurence] and E.9 [18th, Horton] broke through into the Baltic in October 1914, although E.11 [Nasmith] failed to make it on the 20th. They were followed in August and September 1915 by E.8, E.18, E.19, but E.13 was lost in the attempt. Known as the Baltic Flotilla.

E.1 [02], submarine – see E.13, submarine, 18 August 1915, Kattegat

E.1 [03], submarine, 19 August 1915, Baltic Sea - German battlecruiser Moltke torpedoed and damaged by E.1 off Gulf of Riga [dx]

E.3 [01], submarine, 18 October 1914, North Sea - E-class, 655/796t, 1912,1-12pdr/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, Pendant No. I.83, Harwich-based 8th Overseas Flotilla, Lt-Cdr George Cholmley, sailed with E.8 from Harwich on 16th for patrol of Borkum at mouth of River Ems, on surface in daytime, 6 men in conning tower. Sighted at 1025 by U.27 [Bernd Wegener], torpedoed once from 300yds, blown in two and sank off Borkum Riff or Reef [H - cause unknown; J - German cruiser Strassburg in Heligoland Bight]; 3 officers and 25 ratings lost, 4 men were seen in water but no immediate attempt was made to rescue them because of more possible British submarines in the area, U.27 surfaced 30min later but found nobody. E.3 was the first RN submarine sunk in action. Wreck located near Schiermonnikoog in 1997 [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/bw/dk/dx/ge/ke/on/un]

E.5 [01], submarine – see E.10, submarine, 18 January 1915, North Sea

E.6 [01], submarine, 26 December 1915, North Sea - one of two naval vessels mined on same day in field laid by UC.5 [Herbert Putkuchen] ten days earlier. E.6, E-class, 655/796t, 1912, 1-12pdr/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 15k/9kts, c30 crew, Pendant No. I.86, Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr William Foster, sailing from Harwich for anti-U-boat patrol off the Horns Reef, left harbour and warned by torpedo boat she was heading into danger - a known minefield that sank HM Trawler Resono earlier in the day [He – saw Resono mined and sink, and closed to rescue survivors], signal acknowledged but E.6 held her course. Mined and sunk quickly near Sunk LV; 3 officers, 29 ratings lost, no survivors [ke - 38 crew]. See also RESONO [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/bw/dk/dx/ke/un]

E.7 [01], submarine, 4 September 1915, Dardanelles - E-class, 655/796t, 1913, 1-12pdr/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, Pendant No. I.87, fitted with 6pdr in 1915, Lt-Cdr Archibald Cochrane, attempting to break through Dardanelles defences to Sea of Marmara to relieve E.11 and partner E.7, set out from Kephalo Bay at 0200 on 4th. Reached Nagara Point at 0700, starboard propeller fouled anti-submarine net, struggled for 12 hours to get free, blowing and flooding tanks and manouevring, which only alerted the defences. Lt Heino von Hemburg, commander of UB.14 [ke - U.14] was rowed out to the approximate position, reportedly by the boat's cook, with one or more small mines which were lowered and detonated near the trapped submarine. According to Hepper, the first mine exploded at 1030 shaking the boat, and a second at 1840 which broke lights and other equipment. Lt Cochrane accepted E.7 would be destroyed, burnt the confidential papers, prepared for scuttling, came to the surface and blew her up [C/Cn - on 5th]; no lives lost, all 38 crew saved, taken to Constantinople as POW's [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/go/ke]

E.8 [01], submarine - see E.1, 17 October 1914, Baltic Operations.

E.8 [02], submarine – see E.13, submarine, 18 August 1915, Kattegat

E.8 [03], submarine, 23 October 1915, Baltic Sea - German armoured cruiser Prinz Adalbert sunk by E.8 off Libau, Latvia. German heavy warships withdrawn from Baltic [dx]

E.9 [01], submarine, 13 September 1914, North Sea - E.9 [Lt-Cdr Max Horton of WW2 Battle of the Atlantic fame] sank German old light cruiser Hela off Heligoland - the first British submarine success.

E.9 [02], submarine, 6 October 1914, North Sea - German torpedo boat S.116 sunk by E.9 off Western Ems. [dx]

E.9 [03], submarine - see E.1, 17 October 1914, Baltic Operations.

E.9 [04], submarine – see E.13, submarine, 18 August 1915, Kattegat

E.9 [05], submarine, 17 December 1915, Baltic Sea - German light cruiser Bremen and destroyer V.191 were sunk by Russian mines, NOT, as wrongly attributed, by submarine E.9 [dx]

E.10 [01], submarine, 18 January 1915, North Sea - E-class, c667/807t, 1913, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, c30 crew, Pendant No. I.90, Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr William Fraser, sailed from Harwich on 18th in company with E.5 and E.15 for Heligoland patrol, E.10 to the NNW of the island, never seen or heard from again, “overdue, presumed lost”. On or after 18th [ke - possibly 18th] - Lost, cause unknown, possibly mined off Heligoland in unknown field laid by Germans on 22 December; 3 officers and 28 ratings lost, no survivors. Wreck discovered in 130ft of water near Heligoland in 2003, damage to starboard ballast tanks and open hatches suggest a mine explosion while running on the surface, presumably at night [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/ke/on]

E.11 [01], submarine - see E.1, 17 October 1914, Baltic Operations.

E.11 [02], submarine – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

E.11 [03], submarine, North Sea, February 1915 - E-class, 667/807t, Harwich-based 8th Flotilla. February - Ran ashore on Scroby Sands, Great Yarmouth, got off [Cn/gr]

E.11 [04], submarine, 19 May 1915, Gallipoli - Lt-Cdr Martin Eric Nasmith [CO, HM S/M E.11] ordered to 'Go and run amuck in the Marmara', reached the Sea of Marmara on the 19th at the start of successful patrol through to early June, followed by two more. Awarded Victoria Cross for his exploits [dx]

E.11 [05], submarine, 1 August 1915, Gallipoli - E.11 [Cdr Nasmith RN], operating in the Sea of Marmara, raided Constantinople Harbour [dx]

E.11 [06], submarine, 8 August 1915, Gallipoli - Turkish old battleship Hayreddin Barbarossa sunk by E.11 [Lt-Cdr Nasmith] in Sea of Marmara [dx]

E.12 [01], submarine, 25 June 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - E-class, 667/807t, 5/9/14, 1-6pdr/5-18in with 10 torpedoes, Lt-Cdr Bruce, penetrated Dardanelles and now operating in eastern part of Sea of Marmara after spending two days repairing main engines, entered Gulf of Mudania and came across two small steamers towing five sailing vessels, turned out to be decoy vessels. Only 10yds from first steamer when a bomb was thrown which failed to explode, fired on with rifles and small masked gun, two towed vessels joined in and tried to foul E.12's propellers. E.12 returned fire, got clear and sank the two steamers and two of the towed sailing vessels. Engine problems now returned; one rating slightly wounded [Rn/Cn/md]

E.12 [02], submarine, 25 October 1915, Gallipoli Campaign – E-class, 667/807t, 5/9/14, Lt-Cdr Kenneth Bruce, operating with H.1 in Sea of Marmara, joined by E.20 and French Turquoise, E.12 now due to leave, headed down on 25th. Passed net and appeared to have carried away part of it, boat forced down to 245ft, then came up near the surface dragging the net behind her, seen and attacked by patrol vessels, plunged down again near Kilid Bahr, missed by two shore-based torpedoes next time she came up, fired at and hit several times by small shells, no serious damage done, dived again and got away [Rn/Cn]

E.13 [01], submarine - see E.1, 17 October 1914, Baltic Operations.

E.13 [02], submarine, 18 August 1915, Kattegat - E-class, 667/807t, 22/9/14, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15kts/9kts, c30 crew, Pendant No. I.93, served at Harwich, Lt-Cdr Geoffrey Layton. Ordered with E.8 to join E.1 and E.9 in the Baltic, sailed Harwich 14th, now approaching the Sound separating Denmark from Sweden late on the 18th, and E.13 dived. [C - 3 September] - Compass failed shortly before 2300, surfaced and ran hard aground on the SE of Saltholm island between Copenhagen and Malmo in neutral waters, tried all night to get clear and at 0500 on the 19th, Danish torpedo boat Narhvalen arrived to inform the captain that there was a 24 hour limit for getting off, no assistance could be given and a guardship would anchor nearby. German destroyer came up but left when two more Danish TB's arrived, by this time it was accepted that E.13 could not be refloated and the crew were waiting to be taken off. About 0900 [or 0930] two German destroyers approached from the south flying the signal "abandon ship immediately", the leading G.132 fired one or two torpedoes which hit the bottom and failed to damage E.13, then both opened fire with machine guns, crew jumped into the water and swam for the shore or the Danish vessels but the Germans apparently fired on them until torpedo boat Soulven interposed herself, destroyers left and surviving men picked up by the Danes; 15 ratings lost by gunfire or drowning, 23 survivors landed in Copenhagen that evening and interned, Lt-Cdr Layton and 1st Lt Paul Eddis later withdrew their parole and escaped back home. The wrecked boat was interned [Cn - 18th; J - 3 September], sold to Danish shipbreakers Petersen & Albeck December 1921 [J - 1919], BU at Copenhagen. E.8 safely reached Revel [Tallinn] [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/ke; ADM.137/146] [Casualty list, for the 19th]

E.14 [01], submarine, 27 April 1915, Gallipoli - Lt-Cdr Edward Courtney Boyle [CO, HM S/M E.14] arrived in the Sea of Marmara on the 27th at the start of a successful patrol, returning on 18 May in time to brief Lt-Cdr Nasmith of E.11. Lt-Cdr Boyle was awarded the Victoria Cross for this and two further patrols [dx]

E.15 [01], submarine – see E.10, submarine, 18 January 1915, North Sea

E.15 [02], submarine – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

E.15 [03], submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - E-class, 667/807t, 23/4/14, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15kts/9kts, 30 crew, Pendant No. I.95, Harwich until 1915, then to Mediterranean, Lt-Cdr Theodore Brodie.

[I] The first Allied attempt to break through Dardanelles to reach Sea of Marmara since failure of French Saphir on 15 January. Departed Mudros night of 16th carrying former British Vice-Consul at Chanak, now Lt Palmer RNVR. The submerged submarine was swept by a strong current into shoal water and grounded, undamaged S of Kephez Point light at around 0600 on the 17th [Cn/D/He – 15th] only a few hundred yards from Fort Dardanos, fired on by the Fort's guns before they realised she was aground, one shell killed Lt Brodie as he climbed out of the conning tower, another burst in an ammonia tank or battery compartment and asphyxiated and killed five crew; with the captain lost, survivors took to water and taken prisoner. Turkish attempts to salvage her started with a torpedo boat trying to pull her off, this was thwarted by bombing attacks, and the decision taken to destroy E.15 where she lay. Submarine B.6 went in but because of heavy fire, failed to hit her with two torpedoes.

[II] That night - the 17th still - destroyers Scorpion and Grampus could not find her because of screening searchlights. Next morning, B.11 failed in its search because of fog, and that afternoon battleships Majestic and Triumph tried to hit her with big guns from within the Dardanelles, but as the shore defences prevented them getting any nearer than 12,000yds, they had to give up. That night - the 18th [Cn - 16th] - a picket boat each from Majestic and Triumph fitted with 14in torpedo dropping gear were sent in under the command of Lt-Cdr Robinson of Vengeance, the officer who had already displayed much gallantry destroying guns on shore in February. Creeping forward in pitch darkness, the boats aproached Kephez Point, when searchlights caught them and heavy gunfire followed. Neither was hit, a searchlight accidentally illuminated E.15 and Majestic's boat launched her torpedo which may have found the target; shortly hit by a shell, she began to sink. Triumph also fired hers, rescued Majestic's crew and with only one man lost, returned safely. Next morning, the 19th, E.15 was reported destroyed [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/ke/md; ADM.1/8418/90]

E.16 [01], submarine, 25 July 1915, North Sea - E-class, 667/807t, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt, Cdr C Talbot, sailed Yarmouth 24th for Ems, next morning kept under by air patrols. Apparently trapped in anti-submarine net near Borkum Riff LV, struggled to surface to find Zeppelin overhead, bombs dropped as she struggled clear, got free an hour after first entanglement. Sank V.188 off Terschelling next day [Rn/Cn/D]

E.16 [02], submarine, 26 July 1915, North Sea – German destroyer V.188 torpedoed and sunk by E.16, 50 miles N of Terschelling [dx]

E.16 [03], submarine, 15 September 1915, off Norway - U.6 sunk by E.16 off Stavanger [dx]

E.18 [01], submarine - see E.1, 17 October 1914, Baltic Operations.

E.19 [01], submarine, 3 October 1915, Baltic Sea - E.19 sank SS Svionia, first German merchant ship war loss in the Baltic [dx]

E.19 [02], submarine - see E.1, 17 October 1914, Baltic Operations.

E.19 [03], submarine, 7 November 1915, Baltic Sea - German light cruiser Undine sunk by E.19 off Trelleberg, Sweden [dx]

E.20 [01], submarine – see E.12, submarine, 25 October 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

E.20 [02], submarine, 6 November 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - E-class, 667/807t, 12/6/15, 1-6in howitzer for shore bombardment/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, Pendant No. I.69, Lt-Cdr Clyfford Warren, successfuly reached Sea of Marmara. Due to rendezvous with French submarine Turquoise near Rodosto, NE part of Sea of Marmara on 6th, but Turquoise had been captured on 30/10/15, reportedly with charts and other documents intact including details of the planned meeting. [C/D - 5th] - UB.14 [Heino von Heimburg] waited submerged at the rendezvous, at 1600 sighted E.20 laying stopped, fired single torpedo at 1710 at the still stationery target from 550yds, hit her amidships and she sank instantly; 21 ratings lost [ke - 27], UB.14 surfaced and rescued the 9 survivors including Cdr Warren who were on the deck at the time. E.20 was the last of four British and four French submarines lost in the Dardanelles in 1915 out of a total of 13 boats that took part. Turkish losses remain uncertain but are quoted as 1 battleship, 1 old battleship/coast defence ship, 1 destroyer, 5 gunboats, 11 transports and around 200 steamers and sailing boats [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/ke/un]

EASTWARD HO!, hired trawler – see CAMEO, Admiralty trawler, July 1915, North Sea

EBRO, armed merchant cruiser – see PATIA, armed merchant cruiser, 11 September 1915, Atlantic W of Scotland

ECHO, whaler – see MERSEY, monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa

EDGAR [01], light cruiser – see HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea

EDGAR [02], light cruiser – see CRESCENT, light cruiser, 11 November 1914, North Atlantic off Northern Scotland

EDISON, Admiralty trawler, 6 July 1915, off NW Scotland - 196/c1896, Hull-reg H430, F & T Ross, hired 1915 as minesweeper [D - 12/14; wi - as armed patrol trawler], Admiralty No.395, SubLt Frederick Townend RNR who had only joined ship that day, now night-time, heading along NW shore of Isle of Lewis, bound for Carloway. Ran aground on Port Arnol, Lewis, may have steered wrong course or compass affected by new gun installation, but apparently not keeping sufficient look-out. Trawler wrecked [wi - exact position unknown, “somewhere on the Isle of Lewis”, around 58N, 06W]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.1/8427/198]

EL ZORRO, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 28 December 1915, Atlantic off S Ireland - 5,989grt, built 1914, London-reg, Lobitos Oilfields, 35 crew, Mr Tamlin, Port Arthur for Dartmouth with oil, steaming at 9kts. U.24 [Rudolf Schneider] opened fire at 0530, Master turned stern-on, went to full speed and sent out SOS, U-boat came up on starboard side at which point engines were stopped and ship abandoned, as the crew were leaving a torpedo hit starboard-side amidships at 0630, followed shortly by a second one port-side. The attack probably took place 10 miles S of Old Head of Kinsale, Co Cork [L - 10 miles SE of], “Wreck Index” goes on to report that the crew reboarded when assistance arrived, taken in tow next day but the tow parted and she went ashore - in Man o' War Cove, near Cork, in 51.45N 08.18W - broke in two and totally wrecked; 3rd engineer killed by shrapnel and a crew member fell overboard and drowned, survivors picked up by patrol boat and landed ashore. A Liverpool company used Chinese laboureres to salvage non-ferrous metal [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un/wi]

ELTON, Admiralty blockship, 2,461grt, built 1888, 300ft, R Ropner, West Hartlepool-reg. [wi - in 58.52.58N, 02.53.52W]. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.2 Barrier, Skerry Sound, between Glims Holm & Lamb Holm islands. Parts of ship were visible at low tide [Lr/D/wi]

EMPRESS [01], seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid - two months after their first unsuccessful attempt, the RNAS was able to launch an attack on the Zeppelin sheds at Cuxhaven, but without causing any damage. Light cruisers Arethusa, Fearless, Undaunted, seaplane carriers Empress, Engadine, Riviera, destroyers including Lurcher, submarines D.6, E.11, seaplanes Nos.119, 120, 135, 136, 811, 814, 815 were amongst those taking part. Attempts were made by U.20, U.22 and U.30 to attack the ships. U.20 fired a torpedo at one of the light cruisers but missed, and the other two were prevented from attacking by the destroyer screen. Zeppelins and seaplanes also dropped bombs without success [Rn/ge]

EMPRESS [02], seaplane carrier – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 24 April 1915, North Sea.

ENCOUNTER [RAN], light cruiser – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

ENDYMION, light cruiser – see HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea

ENGADINE [01], seaplane carrier, 25 October 1914, North Sea - only 11 years after the Wright brother's first successful powered flight, the Royal Navy attempted to attack Zeppelin sheds at Cuxhaven using "aircraft carriers", but the seaplanes were unable to take off from the water. Seaplane carriers Engadine and Riviera took part escorted by Harwich Force. During the attempted Cuxhaven Raid, two Harwich Force ships encountered U-boats: Fearless, light cruiser, Active-class, leader 1st DF [broad pendant, Cdre Tyrhwitt]. Believed attacked by submarine, possibly off Ems River, two torpedoes reported [Cn/D/ty] and Badger, destroyer, I-class, c990t, 1st DF, Lt-Cdr G Freemantle. Ran down U.19 in pitch dark and believed to have sunk her off the Dutch coast. Although badly damaged the submarine reached port; Badger’s own bows “bent up” [Cn/D/ge/gf/ty]

ENGADINE [02], seaplane carrier – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

ENOSIS, Admiralty collier, 18 November 1915, Central Mediterranean - 3,409grt, built 1906, London-reg, Eftikhia SS, Mr Alfred Bowling, from Barry/Malta with coal [te - Barry for Malta]. Captured by U.33 [Konrad Gansser], sunk by torpedo 150 miles ESE of Malta [L - 240 miles E by S of]; master mortally wounded on bridge by shell-fire [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un]

EQUINOX, hired trawler – see CLEON, hired trawler, 10 August 1915, Dover Straits

ERIN II, hired trawler, 19 October 1915, English Channel - 181grt, built 1903, Hull-reg H757, Great Northern SS Fishing, hired 9/14 as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.381, Portmsouth-based, Lt Edward Rule RNR. Returning to harbour late morning, mined, laid by UC.5 [Herbert Pustkuchen] earlier that day, stern lifted out of water and after end wrecked, sank rapidly 3 cables SE of off Nab Light [wi - SE of Nab LV, in 50.35N, 00.51.12W]; 6 ratings lost and 1 DOW. Lt Rule reached the boat which had floated clear, then a second explosion, presumably a second mine, blew him over the other side, but he was rescued [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.1/8436/309, ADM.137/543]

ERNE, destroyer North Sea, 6 February 1915 - E-class, 620t, 1903, 412pdr/218in tt, 25kts, 70 crew, Pendant No. N.58, Scapa Flow Patrol Flotilla, Lt-Cdr John Landon. Grounded on the beach about 800yds S of Rattray Head lighthouse on the Aberdeen coast in severe easterly gale, failed to be refloated and abandoned as a wreck in October; no lives lost. A survey in November found her back was broken, wreck sold for £405 in January 1916 to Forth shipbreaking, Bo’ness for BU [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/gf/ke; ADM.156/2471, ADM.116/1422]

ESPIEGLE [01], sloop – see OCEAN, battleship 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

ESPIEGLE [02], sloop, 21 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign - British-Indian forces occupied Basra by 23rd; sloops Espiegle, Odin, troopship Lawrence [RIM], and gunboats including Comet, Lewis Pelly took part.

ESPIEGLE [03], sloop, 4 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign - attacks mounted up the Shatt-el-Arab to take the strategic town of Kurnah/Al Qurnah 46 miles N of Basra at the confluence of the Euphrates and Tigris, surrendered on the 9th. Amphibious landing and fire support provided by sloops Espiegle, Odin, troopship Lawrence [RIM], armed launches Lewis Pelly, Miner, Shaitan and two river steamers mounting 18pdr field guns.

ESPIEGLE [04], sloop – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

ESPIEGLE [05], sloop, 24 July 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - British-Indian forces forces advancing from Kurnah/Al Qurnah along the increasingly shallow River Euphrates drove the Turks out of Nasiriya, which was occupied next day. Old stern-wheelers Shushan, Muzaffri and Messudieh [all manned and armed respectively by deeper-draught sloops Espiegle, Odin and launch tug Miner] and armed launch Sumana took part [dx]

ETOILE POLAIRE, hired trawler, 3 December 1915, Dover Straits - 278grt, built 1915, transferred directly into naval service, hired 3/15 [He – as minesweeper], 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1402, Dover Patrol, blowing hard from SW with heavy seas. Mined at 1130, laid by UC.1 [Egon von Werner], sank off South Goodwin Sands, off Deal [D/sc/wi - off South Goodwin LV, in 51.12N, 01.29E; He – 1 mile ESE of LV]; 3 ratings lost [He – all ten crew saved], survivors got away, carried towards breakers on Goodwin Sands, tide turned and drifted them down-Channel, by pulling hard they managed to reach the South Goodwin LV and safety [H/L/Lr/C/D/he/dk/dq/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8441/351]

EURYALUS [01], cruiser – see SWIFTSURE, battleship 5 March 1915, Turkish Coastal Operations

EURYALUS [02], cruiser – see TRIUMPH, battleship, 6 March 1915, Smyrna Blockade

EURYALUS [03], cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

EURYALUS [04], cruiser – see FANNY, tug, 9 May 1915, Suez Canal area

EXCELLENT, gunboat, 4 November 1914, Belgian Coast Operations - Bombardment of Lombartzyde near Nieuport by old gunboats Bustard and Excellent

EXFORD, collier [kp - Admiralty chartered], 19 October 1914, Indian Ocean - 4,542grt, built 1911, Tatem Steam Navigation Co, Cardiff-reg, sailing UK for India with 5,500t Welsh coal. Sighted by German light cruiser Emden at 0030 [L - in 08.27N, 74.49E; kp 8.39N, 75.07E], stopped about 0100 using siren and signal lamp, retained as collier. Emden currently in company with British steamships Buresk, Troilus and St Egbert, later that day at 1900, released St Egbert with prisoners. Exford recaptured by armed merchant cruiser Empress of Asia, arrived Singapore 11 December [H/L/Mn/kp]

EXMOUTH [01], battleship – see AUDACIOUS, dreadnought, 27 October 1914, off N Ireland.

EXMOUTH [02], battleship, 23 November 1914, Belgian Coast Operations - Old Duncan-class battleships Russell and Exmouth, 6th BS bombarded Zeebrugge, but inflicted little damage.

EYRIE, Admiralty drifter, 2 September 1914, North Sea - 84grt, built 1911, Lowestoft-reg LT1121, hired 9/14 as minesweeper, unarmed, Admiralty No.214, Skipper Thomas Scarll RNR. In company with two trawlers and gunboat Speedy [lost next day with another trawler], sweeping Humber field laid by German Nautilus, off the Outer Dowsing shoal. Snagged a mine at 0920 off Cley next the Sea which exploded, blowing apart her stern, sank rapidly off Outer Dowsing LV [wi - in 53.30N, 01.05E, He - last noted position 53.40.5N 01.01.5E]; skipper and 5 ratings lost [H/L/C/D/He/ap/dk/wi; ADM.137/1002]


F

FAIR ISLE, hired trawler, 26 December 1914, North Sea – one of two hired trawlers lost in gales. 192grt, built 1909, R H Charlton, Granton-reg GN70, hired 1914 as minesweeper [wi - patrol trawler], 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.263, [wi - A Wilson, Capt]. Ran aground at 1815 in heavy weather in Sinclair Bay, N of Wick, Caithness [wi - in 58.30N, 03.07.30W], abandoned as wreck; no lives lost. Salved and refloated 1917, repaired as Grimsby GY820, rehired April 1917 by Admiralty as minesweeper, in service to 1920. See also TOM TIT [H/Lr/C/D/dk/wi; ADM.137/82]

FALCON, destroyer, 28 October 1914, Belgian Coast - C-class, 420t, 1-12pdr/5-6pdr/2-18in tt, 6th DF Dover Patrol, Lt Hubert Wauton, on anti-submarine patrol with destroyer Syren off Westende in NE Channel. Came under heavy, accurate shore-fire from Westende battery at c1230, returned fire and stayed on station, at 1400 between Nieuport and Ostend hit by 8in shell on port forward 6pdr muzzle, ship completely out of action and brought into Dunkirk by Acting Sub-Lt du Boulay; captain and 7 ratings killed, 2 ratings DOW, gunner and about 12 more ratings wounded [Rn/dk/dp/dq]

FALMOUTH III, hired trawler, 19 November 1915, Dover Straits - 198grt, built 1909, Bristol-reg BL12, Western Steam Trawling, hired 1915 [D - 8/14] as minesweeper, Admiralty No.152, Lt H Beadle DSC RNR, Dover Patrol, sweeping area where hospital ship Anglia sank. [dq - 17th] - Mined, laid by UC.5 [Herbert Pustkuchen], blown in half, sank off Dover [D - off Deal; dq - around No.8 buoy; sc - on top of wreck of Anglia until dislodged by gale some days later; wi - in 51.02.38N, 01.19.01E]; 1 officer, 6 ratings lost, Lt Beedle went down with the ship but came to the surface and rescued. Note: mine presumably laid by UC.5 [H/L/Lr/C/D/He*/dk/dq/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8440/340]

FANE, hired trawler – see HELPER, paddle minesweeper, June 1915, English Channel

FANNY, tug, 9 May 1915, Suez Canal area - no further information, probably civilian vessel but crew included at least three ratings from armoured cruiser HMS Euryalus. Lost in accidental sinking; three ratings drowned, two of them buried at Ismailia, near Suez [dk]

FEARLESS [01], light cruiser - see 28 August 1914, BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT.

FEARLESS [02], light cruiser - see ENGADINE, seaplane carrier, 25 October 1914, North Sea.

FEARLESS [03], light cruiser – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

FEARLESS [04], light cruiser, 10 September 1915, North Sea - Active-class, 4,000t, 1st DF leader, Harwich Force, sailing with battlecruiser force supporting minelaying operation in the Heligoland Bight on the night of 10th/11th. Collided with unidentified destroyer during mining, Fearless sustained "considerable damage"; but apparently no deaths. Kindell confirms that Fearless was in collision with destroyer Hydra, also 1st DF and that the the cruiser lost two men killed with two more dying of injuries, and Hydra, one man killed [Cn/dk/gf/gr]

FEARLESS, hired drifter – see SANDA, hired yacht, 25 September 1915, Belgian Coast

FENTONIAN, hired trawler, 14 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - 221grt, built 1913, Grimsby-reg GY804, hired 3/15 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.448; 2 crew killed. See also AMETHYST [D/dk]

FERNDALE, hired drifter, 27 December 1915, St George's Channel – one of two hired drifters employed as net tenders lost off Milford Haven, Pembrokeshire in winter storm. Both attempting to enter the Haven and return to Pembroke Dock:

FERNDALE, 75grt, built 1910, Inverness-reg INS171, owned by Janes Garden, hired 2/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2269, Skipper James Garden RNR in command. Wrecked on St. Ann's Head [wi - in 51.40.45N, 05.10.15W], observed by Coastguard station turning into the Haven in heavy seas, member of crew washed overboard, attempt made to rescue him, drifted close inshore, struck rocks below the Head and quickly broke up. Winds too strong for rocket apparatus to reach the stricken ship with rescue lines; Skipper, 8 ratings lost [H/C/D/He/dk/ps/wi; ADM.137/190];

LADYSMITH [1], 89grt, built 1904, Banff-reg BF1528, hired 6/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2180, Skipper John Wood RNR. Last seen that afternoon being driven by gale towards Skokholm island, disappeared off Milford Haven, believed foundered [wi - blt 1906, Grimsby-reg, lost in 51.40.45N, 05.10.15W]; Skipper, 8 ratings lost [He – all 11 hands] [H/C/D/He/dk/ps/wi; ADM.137/897]

FERNLANDS, Admiralty blockship, 2,042grt, built 1885, 276ft, R Hardy, West Hartlepool-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Sunderland, Durham - final scuttling location not known [Lr/D]

FIERAMOSCA, Admiralty blockship, 18 December 1915, Gallipoli Campaign – one of three vessels scuttled at Suvla Beach, W Gallipoli peninsula by the 18th for the final evacuation:

FIERAMOSCA, Admiralty blockship, 578grt, built 1873, 170ft, Bari, Italy-reg, Puglia SS, purchased 1914/15 originally for use at Malta. Scuttled as pier and breakwater [Lr/Rn/D];

PINA, steamship, presumably Admiralty blockship. Scuttled as breakwater [ms – lists a Pina, cargo steamship, 1,986grt, built 1883, but believed lost March 1917. This is the only pre-WW1 Pina not definitely accounted for] [Rn/ms];

Dredger [name unknown], already wrecked, possibly Admiralty blockship. Sunk as boat pier [Rn]

FIREDRAKE [01], destroyer – see C.31, submarine, 4 January 1915, North Sea.

FIREDRAKE [02], destroyer – see C.33, submarine, 4 August 1915, North Sea

FIREFLY [01], river gunboat, 22 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - Battle of Ctesiphon south of Baghdad until 25th/26th, British/Indian forces then forced to retreat down the River Tigris towards Kut. New Yarrow river gunboat Firefly, armed tug Comet, armed launches Shaitan, Sumana, stern-wheelers Messoudieh, Shushan towing horse-boats carrying 4-4.7in naval guns took part [dx]

FIREFLY [02], river gunboat – see SHAITAN, armed launch, 28 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

FIREFLY [03], river gunboat, 1 December 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - reaching Umm-at-Tubal on the 30 November, British/Indian forces discovered the Turks next morning camped barely a mile away, attacks launched to cover the continued withdrawal from Ctesiphon back to Kut supported by River Flotilla vessels Firefly, Comet, Messoudieh, Shushan, Sumana, all of which were fired on:

FIREFLY, river gunboat, Fly-class, 98t, built Yarrow in sections, re-erected at Abadan starting 8/15, entered service 11/15, 9.5kts, c1-4in/1-12pdr/1-6pdr, 22 crew, Lt Christopher Eddis. Hit in the boiler by a shell, entirely disabled; 1 rating lost. Comet managed to take her in tow but both went hard aground, Turks closing in, Sumana took off both crews and both vessels had to be abandoned. Firefly captured by Turks and put back into service as Suleiman Pak, in action and recaptured 26/2/17 by gunboat Tarantula, near where she was lost. Lt Eddis resumed command [J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dx/gb/tf; ADM.137/3089];

COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 144t, ex-RIM, official yacht of British Resident at Baghdad, hired 5/11/14 [C - 1915], 1-3pdr from Espiegle, later 1-6pdr/3-3pdr/2mg, Lt George Harden. When Comet went aground as she was trying to take Firefly in tow, a tug dropped two barges to try to pull her off but failed, tug managed to get away but lost the barges, one full of wounded. Reportedly Comet was set ablaze and the commander dived overboard "when the Turks were already swarming upon [its] abandoned deck"; 1 Indian rating lost [H/Rn/C/D/He/dk/dx/tf; ADM.137/3089]

FIRST BOMBARDMENT OF BRITISH COAST, RAID ON GORLESTON, 3 November 1914 - German 1st Scouting Group of battlecruisers [Adm Hipper] raided Gorleston/Great Yarmouth apparently with the main aim of covering the laying a minefield off Yarmouth. Although an attack was anticipated in the southern North Sea area, the only ships that encountered the Germans were minesweeping gunboat Halcyon and patrol destroyers Lively and Leopard, all of which came under fire from heavy guns around the same time that Yarmouth was shelled. Three submarines headed out of Gorleston for the sound of the guns but one was mined, more destroyers of the Yarmouth Patrol came out too late to take part, and Harwich force failed to intercept:

HALCYON, minesweeper, ex-Dryad-class torpedo gunboat, 1,070t, originally 2-4.7in/3-18in tt, Lowestoft-based, sweeping off Smith’s Knoll, about 20 miles NE of Yarmouth. Sighted large warships about 4 miles S of Cross Sands LV, steamed towards them and made challenge, fired at by 11in and other guns and turned away, made report at 0700, escaped with minimum damage by frequent course changes and under cover of smokescreen laid by Lively; one rating DOW [Rn/Cn/D/dk/dk/dx/nb/nh/ty];

LIVELY, B-class, 435t and Leopard, C-class, 400t, both destroyers armed with 1-12pdr/5-6pdr/2-18in tt, patrol or local defence flotillas, probably Yarmouth Patrol, Lively 2 miles SW of Halcyon, Leopard astern of Lively near Scroby Buoy. Spotting Halcyon's plight, Lively laid a smokescreen between her and the enemy, all three ships came under heavy fire and were chased by the Germans until fearful of possible British minefields they turned east [Rn/Cn/D/dx/nb];

D.5, submarine, D class, 495/620t, 1911, 112pdr/318in tt with 6 torpedoes [Cn - contrary to other sources, only D.4 was fitted with a gun], 14/9kts, 25 crew, Pendant No. I.75, Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr Godfrey Herbert, moored off Gorleston with D.3 and E.10, all under orders, D.5 for Terschelling. Put to sea at 0815 to intercept the German warships [H/C - 3 October], at 1030, mined aft off Great Yarmouth [He - about two miles SE of South Cross lightship; dx - 2 miles S of South Cross Sand buoy], and sank in less than a minute. As this was away from the scene of German minelaying, it was probably a drifting British mine; 1 officer and 20 ratings lost, 5 survived including the bridge party, CO and three crew picked up by local fishing drifter Faithful and a fifth by drifter Homeland. Crew of Faithful awarded £75 for saving life in dangerous waters [H/J/Rn/Rn/C/Cn/D/bw/dk/dx/ke/nh/on; ADM.1/8401/405, ADM.137/72].

Light cruiser Kolberg laid a line of mines 5 miles long in Smith's Knoll passage, probably as the German force left the area, but the laying was spotted by a Lowestoft fisherman and reported by 1100. As they returned to base, cruiser Yorck was mined and sunk in a defensive field in Jade Bay. A number of British vessels were lost in the Yarmouth minefield, including three fishing vessels the same day.



FISGARD, harbour repair hulk – see ROEDEAN, auxiliary screw minesweeper, 13 January 1915, Orkneys.

FISGARD II, repair ship, 17 September 1914, English Channel - was central battery ironclad Invincible, 6,010t, 1869, 10-9in/4-6in, relegated to harbour service, boy artificers training ship, renamed Erebus in 1904, Fisgard II in 1906, based at Portsmouth with engines, steering gear and armament removed. She was one of two old Fisgard's scheduled to become repair workshops at Scapa Flow, 64 passage crew, being towed west-about by tugs Danube and Southampton, accompanied by Fisgard I, departed Portsmouth on 16th. Next day, off Portland in very heavy weather, water shipped through hawse pipes, machinery shifted to try to correct trim, both tug captains aware she was in distress but could not get her into Portland, finally heeled over on beam ends and foundered 5 miles off Portland Bill around 1620 [wi - 50.25N, 02.30W]; one of four boats smashed during launching, 6 ratings and 11 dockyard personnel lost plus non-naval dockyard civilians – various contracted labourers from Portsmouth Dockyard [Rn - total of 23; He – 6 ratings, 11 dockyard labourers; dx/wi - 21]. Fisgard I got into Plymouth. As Scapa Flow needed to be converted from an anchorage into a well-equipped fleet base, Fisgard II was a real loss to the Grand Fleet [J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/se/wi; ADM.1/8394/322]

FLY, whaler – see MERSEY, monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa

FLYING CONDOR, tug – see AUDACIOUS, dreadnought, 27 October 1914, off N Ireland,

FORESIGHT, light cruiser – see ATTENTIVE, light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast

FORMIDABLE, battleship, 1 January 1915, English Channel - Formidable-class, 15,800t, 1898, 4-12in/12-6in/18-12pdr/4-18in tt, 18kts, c800 crew, Pendant No. 50, 5th BS, Capt Arthur Loxley, flagship Vice-Adm Sir Lewis Bayly, Commander-inChief, Channel Fleet, Squadron based at Sheerness but now less HMS Bulwark.

[I] Sailed 30 December for firing practice off Portland, escorted by six Harwich Force destroyers as far as Folkestone where they turned back as the Channel was believed free of U-boats, now only accompanied by attached light cruiser Topaze of 5th BS and Diamond of 6th. Reaching Portland at daybreak on New Year's Day, 6th BS did not enter harbour but exercised 25 miles from Portland Bill for most of the day, Adm Bayly decided to stay at sea and to be ready for further exercises next day, headed for a position south of the Isle of Wight. Abreast of the Needles at 1900, and in accordance with Fleet Orders that if there was any possibilty of a submarine attack a course change should be made just after dark, the squadron turned back with the two cruisers following, sailing a straight course for Start Point, Devon ready to turn again, Formidable now at rear, sea rough, night cloudy with visibility two miles.

[II] Torpedoed by U.24 [Rudolph Schneider] starboard side abreast foremost funnel at 0220 [He - 0230], engine-room flooded and ship listed 20° to starboard, at 0230 Formidable was seen to fall out of line, Topaze came up to find her lowering launch, pinnace and two barges, one of which capsized in the now violent seas. About 0305 a second torpedo hit port-side abreast after funnel, rising sea and wind and intense darkness made rescue difficult for Topaze and Diamond. With bows now awash, Formidable began to heel rapidly to starboard around 0445, settling by the bow, abandon ship was ordered and she sank [dx - 21 mile E of Start Point; ke - 25 miles off Portland; wi - off Start Point, in 50.13.12N, 03.03.58W]; 547 men drowned or died of exposure - 34 officers including Capt Loxley, 511 ratings and 2 canteen staff [He - 35 officers and 512 men died, and 233 survived; ke - 233 survivors], Topaze took off 43 men from the barge, Diamond rescued 37, the launch got clear, picked up more men, then was found at noon near Berry Head by Brixham trawler Provident and her crew of 4 who took off all 71 in gale-force winds before the launch sank. Another boat drifted ashore near Lyme Regis with 46 men [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ke/un; ADM.116/1437A]

FORTUNE, destroyer – see ARDENT, destroyer, 11 October 1915, North Sea

FORWARD, light cruiser - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914.

FOX [01], light cruiser – see GOLIATH, battleship 28 November 1914, German East Africa Campaign

FOX [02], light cruiser 12 January 1915, German East Africa Campaign - Mafia Is, S of Zanzibar and off Rufuji River captured by troops of King's African Rifles. Light cruiser Fox, armed merchant cruiser Kinfauns Castle took part, supported to seaward by light cruiser Weymouth, gunboat Duplex and ex-German tug Adjutant [dx]

FOXHOUND, destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

FRONS OLIVIAE hired drifter, 12 October 1915, North Sea - [C - Frons Olive; D/dk/dq - Frons Olivae], 98grt, built 1912, Yarmouth-reg YH.217, hired 12/14 as patrol boat, 1-3pdr, Admiralty identification letter Q, Dover Patrol, Lt Thomas Rogers RNR in command, Skipper George Meale. Patrol duties in the Downs, mined, laid by UC.5 [Herbert Pustkuchen], sank at 0450, 1/4 mile SE of Elbow Buoy, off North Foreland, Kent; Lt Rogers, the Skipper and 9 ratings lost. Note: correct spelling appears to be Frons Olivae [H/L/C/D/Hedk/dq/un; ADM.1/8435/303]

FULGENT, Admiralty collier, 30 April 1915, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 2,008grt, built 1910, Westoll Line/James Westoll, Sunderland-reg, collier No.151, presumably Pendant No. Y3.151, 20 crew, Mr C Brown, from Cardiff south-about Ireland for Scapa Flow with 2,750t coal. U.30 [Kurt Wippern] [L/Mn - U.7 but sunk 21 January 1915; ge - U.23] surfaced close astern at 0900 and fired one shot, collier went to full speed, attempted to keep the U-boat astern, but quickly overhauled on the port quarter, second shell hit bridge, engines stopped and ship abandoned. U.30 used the port-side boat to put a scuttling crew on board, charges sank her at 0945, 20 miles WNW from Blasket islands, N entrance to Dingle Bay [L/te/un - 45 miles NW of Skellig Rocks; wi - in 52.10.10N, 11.10W]; man at the wheel killed and master badly wounded by second shell, 14 men took to the starboard boat with the master while the rest took the port, the boats stayed together all through the 30th and into the 31st then became separated during the night. The survivors, excluding the master who died two hours after being taken off, were picked up the SS’s Tosto and Angle, and landed at Galway and Kilrush on 1 May [H/L/Lr/Mn/ge/te/un/wi]

FURY, destroyer – see PATUCA, armed merchant cruiser, 1 July 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland


G

G.M.V., hired drifter, 13 March 1915, North Channel - 94grt, built 1907, Lowestoft-reg LT.1062, hired 2/15 as net drifter, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1109, Skipper William Woodgate RNR. In collision with minesweeping trawler Hungarian [186grt] off Mull of Kintyre/Larne, Co Antrim in North Channel [wi - blt 1909, Inverness-reg, Skipper G McLeod, lost in 54.53N, 05.33W]; no lives lost [H/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/100]

GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings – [I] The Gallipoli "military" as distinct from the Dardanelles "naval" campaign started with Allied landings around the southern Gallipoli Peninsula. From south round to the west, French troops landed near Kum Kale as a diversion, British 29th Division landed at "S"-Morto Bay, "V"-Sedd el Bahr or Cape Helles, "W"-Tekke Burnu, "X"-a mile north of Tekke Burnu and Y-beaches, and the two ANZAC divisions further north still at Z-beach north of Gaba Tepe, all, except the French on the European shore. A diversionary demonstration was made off Bulair at the neck of the Peninsular, and follow-up troops landing in the south included a Royal Marine brigade, the Royal Naval Division and an Indian brigade.

[II] The landings required about 200 transports, supported by a fleet of 16 British battleships, 9 cruisers, 24 destroyers, 8 submarines including Australian AE.2, 2 French battleships, 3 cruisers, 5 destroyers, 4 submarines, Russian cruiser Askold, auxiliaries and minesweepers all under the command of Vice-Adm de Robeck, with Cdre Keyes as Chief of Staff.

[III] Ships taking part included:

Fleet Flagship – dreadnought Queen Elizabeth;

First Squadron [Main British landings, S to Y beaches] – battleships Swiftsure [2nd flag], Albion, Lord Nelson, Implacable, Vengeance, Prince George [attached to French landings], Goliath, Cornwallis, cruisers Minerva, Euryalus [flag], Talbot, Dublin, and six fleet minesweepers;

Second Squadron [Anzac Cove landings] – battleships Queen [flag], London, Prince of Wales, Triumph, Majestic, cruiser Bacchante, submarine depot ship Adamant, seaplane carrier Ark Royal, balloon ship Manica, destroyers Beagle, Bulldog, Foxhound, Scourge, Chelmer, Colne, Ribble, Usk, and four trawlers;

Third Squadron [feint attack on Bulair] – battleship Canopus, cruisers Dartmouth, Doris, and two destroyers;

Fourth Squadron [cruisers and trawlers attached to First] – cruisers Sapphire, Amethyst, and 12 trawlers;

Fifth Squadron [including minesweepers and netlayers] – battleship Agamemnon, 10 destroyers, three French minesweepers, two netlaying trawlers;

Sixth Squadron [French landings] – two French battleships, three French cruisers, seven destroyers and five torpedo boats;

Seventh Squadron [Smyrna blockade] – four destroyers and armed yacht Triad.

[IV] Many of the troops were landed ashore in ship's boats from battleships and by destroyers, the only specialist assault ship was SS River Clyde:

RIVER CLYDE, landing assault ship, ex-collier, 3,913grt, built 1905, Ormond Cook & Co, Glasgow, purchased 12/4/15, converted by Cdr Unwin of minesweeping gunboat Hussar to land 2,500 troops directly ashore. Ports were cut in River Clyde's side, she towed a steam hopper port side and four lighters alongside, two on either bow, material was carried for a permanent pier and armoured machine-gun positions mounted on the forecastle. In operation, River Clyde was to be grounded, the hopper steam past, ground itself and drop down a gangway, troops would leave through the ports on each side, enter one lighter, cross to the second to reach the hopper and then ashore. Beached just before 0700 under "murderous fire" at the Seddul Bahr end of V-beach [the other end was Cape Helles], the hopper grounded too far from the shore for the gangway to reach and the front lighter swung away, only 200 troops reached the land in the first three hours, leaving many others dead and wounded. Even this small success was only made possible by Cdr Unwin and members of the crew who in full view of the Turks, secured and held the lighters and hopper as the troops passed over. Cdr Unwin stood in the water holding lines and although wounded, later rescued other wounded from the shore by boat, Midshipman Drewry in command of the hopper was also wounded but carried on until Midshipman Malleson took over, AB William stayed in the water holding the pontoon fast until he was killed and Seaman Samson worked on the lighters all day before being badly wounded. The main body of troops only landed that night. Mid George Leslie Drewry RNR [from Hussar], Mid Wilfred St Aubyn Malleson [battleship Cornwallis], Seaman George McKenzie Samson RNR [Hussar], Cdr Edward Unwin [Hussar], AB William Charles William RFR [Hussar] posthumously, were all awarded the Victoria Cross. River Clyde was later salvaged, sold 1920, renamed Angela, not broken up until 1966 [Rn/C/dx/mf/ms/vc];

[V] BEAGLE, BULLDOG, FOXHOUND, SCOURGE, G-class, c1,100t, 1-4in/3-12pdr/2-18in tt and CHELMER, COLNE, RIBBLE, USK, E-class, c630t, 4-12pdr, 2-18in tt, destroyers taking part in landings on Z-beach, later known as Anzac Cove, with 2nd Squadron [Rear-Adm Thursby]. Four thousand men of 3rd Australian Brigade carried as an advanced guard by battleships Queen [flag], Prince of Wales, London and six of the destroyers, rest of the Anzac Corps in transports anchored offshore, cover provided by battleships Triumph, Majestic and cruiser Bacchante. Sixteen laden ship's lifeboats were towed in by picket boats, followed by equally-laden destroyers towing more lifeboats for their troops to disembark in; landing started around 0430, destroyers came under heavy machine gun and rifle fire. Many troops killed on the decks, crews suffered casualties. By 1400, 12,000 troops of 1st Australian Division were ashore with two batteries of Indian artillery, and within 24 hours, the 2nd Australian Division including a New Zealand Brigade had joined them [Rn/Cn/D/dd]; [VII] Two more G-class destroyers, 5th DF Mediterranean Fleet, temporarily equipped as minesweepers, also hit by Turkish shore fire, probably other destroyers damaged as well at other times:

MOSQUITO, heavy casualties including First Lt killed [dk – only man killed] [Cn/D/dd/dk];

RACOON, Lt-Cdr A Muller. Date uncertain, sometime after 25 April - hit in one her boilers off Seddul Bahr [Rn/Cn/D/mf];

[VI] Note: Kindell lists the following warship casualties on the 25th. It is not known if all those who died of wounds were wounded on this day or previously: Dreadnought QUEEN ELIZABETH [1 kia]; battleships AGAMEMNON [3 dow], ALBION [2 dow], CANOPUS [3 kia], CORNWALLIS [15 kia], IMPLACABLE [2 kia], LORD NELSON [4 kia], PRINCE GEORGE [1 kia], PRINCE OF WALES [1 dow], QUEEN [1 kia], SWIFTSURE [1 dow], TRIUMPH [1 dow], VENGEANCE [1 kia]; armoured cruisers BACCHANTE [1 kia, 1 dow], EURYALUS [6 kia]; destroyers CHELMER [1 kia], MOSQUITO [1 kia]; assault ship RIVER CLYDE [1 kia]; despatch boat OSIRIS [1 kia, 1 dow]; and submarine depot ship ADAMANT [1 kia].

More men from some of these ships died of wounds over the succeeding days, but again, it is not known how many of them were wounded on the 25th. It is assumed all these warships may have been damaged to some, mainly small, extent, although some of the casualties may have occurred ashore, during ship-to-shore operations or while serving in other ships e.g. AB William Williams of HMS Hussar awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously in action with River Clyde. Royal Navy Division losses on the day were 13, with many more sadly to come [dk].

[VII] On the 26th, the British Y-beach was evacuated and the French withdrew from the Asiatic shore to reinforce the British right inland of De Totts battery.



GANGES, shore establishment – see JAPAN, hired trawler, 16 August 1915, North Sea

GARGANO, Admiralty blockship, 1915, Central Mediterranean – one of two blockships, 180ft long, Puglia SS Co, Bari, Italy-reg, purchased 1914/15, for use at Malta; location and date of scuttling not known: GARGANO, 700grt, built 1884 [Lr/D]; LUCANO, 709grt, built 1884 [Lr/D]

GARMO, hired trawler, 20 December 1914, North Sea - One of two hired auxiliaries mined in the Kolberg-laid Scarborough field. 203grt, built 1900, Ocean Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY1165, hired 11/14, believed as patrol vessel [He – minesweeper], armed, Admiralty No.810, Skipper Thaddeus Gilbert RNR, on patrol rather than minesweeping [He – minesweeping]. Mined about an hour after Valiant, turned right over and sank off Scarborough [wi - 3.5 miles SE of Scarborough Castle, in 54.15.12N, 00.17.06W]; skipper died of injuries from the explosion and five ratings lost, survivors saved by HM Drifter Principal. Wreck lies at 80ft. See also VALIANT [H/L/Lr/Rn/Mn/C/D/He/ap/dk/sc/wi; ADM.1/8407/478]

GARMSIR, launch-tug – see OCEAN, battleship 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

GARRY, destroyer, 23 November 1914, North Sea - E-class, 660t, Scapa Flow Local Defence Flotilla, Cdr W Wilson. U.18 rammed and damaged by trawler Dorothy Grey off Scapa Flow in Pentland Firth, then rammed and sunk by Garry [un – in 58.41N, 02.55W] [Cn/D/gf/ub/un]

GARTMORE, Admiralty blockship 1,774grt, built 1879, 270ft, Gart SS Co, Glasgow-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, final location not known, possibly not Scapa Flow [Lr/D]

GARTSHORE, Admiralty blockship, 1,564grt, built 1880, 255ft, Gart SS Co, South Shields-reg [D - for use at Portland]. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.3 Barrier, East Weddel Sound, between Burray & Glims Holm islands [wi - in 58.52.17N, 02.54.47W] [Lr/D/wi]

GENERAL CRAUFORD , monitor – see SANDA, hired yacht, 25 September 1915, Belgian Coast

GERMAN MINELAYING RAID ON ENGLISH EAST COAST, 25th/26th August 1914 – [I] Two German minelaying forces sailed early on 25th to lay mines off English East coast - minelayer Albatros, escorted by light cruiser Stuttgart and 1/2 TBF from Heligoland headed for the Tyne, and minelayer Nautilus, escorted by Mainz and another 1/2 TBF from the Ems for Humber. Minelayers carried c200 moored contact mines each and laid them in "thick weather".

[II] Laying the Tyne field started around 0030 on the 26th, apparently should have been about 5 miles off the estuary, but was nearer 30 miles offshore; the first indications were the sinking of a Danish/Icelandic fishing vessel that evening.

[III] The Humber field was laid earlier, starting at 2300 on the 25th, stretched from Flamborough Head down to Outer Dowsing about 30 miles offshore, completed around 0150 on the 26th when the force turned for home; the first indication came when a mine exploded in the nets of trawler City of Bristol later on the 26th. Both German forces sank trawlers on the fishing grounds - the Tyne force a total of six, and the Humber force variously seven or ten. According to Corbett, a total of 16 were sunk by the destroyers using bombs 70 miles E of the Humber [probably only an indication of the location] after first taking the crews prisoner and as the minelayers carried on with their mission.



GERMAN RAID ON HARTLEPOOL, SCARBOROUGH AND WHITBY, 16 December 1914. [I] Fleet encounter - German 1st SG battlecruisers and 2nd SG light cruisers escorted by destroyers sailed to attack the Yorkshire coast. Battlecruisers Seydlitz, Moltke and cruiser Blucher were to bombard Hartlepool, battlecruisers Derfflinger and Von der Tann to bombard Scarborough, and light cruiser Kolberg to lay up to 100 mines off Flamborough Head. Both the German and British battlefleets were out in support of their forces. Coming south in anticipation of this attack the seven 4th DF destroyers screening Adm Beatty's battlecruisers - Lynx, Ambuscade, Unity, Hardy of 1st Div and Shark, Acasta, Spitfire of 2nd Div, met destroyers from the German light cruiser screen in the Dogger Bank area, in c54.10N, 03.00E at 0515. When challenged, they opened fire damaging Lynx and Ambuscade, the remaining destroyers then sighted cruiser Hamburg close by at 0553. This time Hardy and Shark opened fire and it was Hardy's turn to be damaged. See also AMBUSCADE, HARDY, LYNX.

[II] Attack on Hartlepool - As Seydlitz, Moltke and Blucher approached at dawn, they were spotted by patrol destroyers Doon, Waveney, Test and Moy, a division of the 9th DF already at sea about 5 miles NE of the port; light cruisers Patrol and Forward and submarine C.9 were unable to leave harbour because of the low state of tide. The destroyers came under 11in fire around 0800, three of them being hit by shell fragments with Doon suffering casualties, then the Germans opened fire on the Hartlepool defences consisting of 3-6in guns. Both C.9 and Patrol came out at this time, followed by Forward, but Patrol was badly hit. In return, the shore batteries hit Moltke and Blucher several times. Two merchantmen were damaged and two fishing vessels sunk in the docks during the Hartlepool bombardment. See also DOON, PATROL.

[III] Attacks on Scarborough and Whitby - Three German ships appeared off the defenceless town of Scarborough just before 0800, battlecruisers Derfflinger and Von der Tann opened fire, while light cruiser Kolberg went to lay mines off Flamborough Head. The two battlecruisers then headed north for Whitby, and opened fire on this equally defenceless port just after 0900, departing after 10min and ignoring two tramp steamers passing to the south. Four fishing vessels were damaged in Scarborough during the bombardment.

[IV] Although the retreating German ships were sighted by ships of the Grand Fleet's 1st LCS and 2nd BS in the low visibility, they could not be brought to action [Rn/D/ap/dk/gf]



GHURKA, destroyer, 4 March 1915 - U.8 was detected by indicator nets in their first success, and then sunk by destroyers Ghurka and Maori in Strait of Dover [dx]

GLASGOW [01], light cruiser – see BATTLE OF CORONEL, 1 November 1914, South East Pacific, Bristol-class, 5,300t, 2-6in/10-4in, South America station, Capt John Luce. Initially engaged by Leipzig, then by Dresden, hit total of five times, about 1919 by unexploded 4.1in shell from Leipzig on conning tower support, then badly damaged by a 4.1in shell port aft on the waterline. Glasgow found the mortally damaged Monmouth but had to leave her around 2020 to locate and warn Canopus; no lives lost. However, Glasgow did lose about 50 parrots, pets of the crew that were released prior to the battle but refused to leave the ship, only ten survived. See also GOOD HOPE, MONMOUTH [Rn/D/dk/nb]

GLASGOW [02], light cruiser – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914. Bristol-class, 5,300t, 2-6in/10-4in/2-18in tt, Capt Luce. In action with Leipzig, hit twice, one boiler damaged; one rating lost, 1 DOW, 4 wounded. See also CARNARVON, CORNWALL, INFLEXIBLE, INVINCIBLE, KENT [Rn/D/dk/nb/nh]

GLASGOW [03], light cruiser – see KENT, cruiser, 14 March 1915, SE Pacific

GLEN AVON [01], paddle minesweeper – see BRIGHTON QUEEN, paddle minesweeper, 6 October 1915, Belgian Coast

GLEN AVON [02], paddle minesweeper – see LADY ISMAY, paddle minesweeper, 21 December 1915, North Sea

GLENBY, Admiralty collier, 17 August 1915, St George's Channel/Atlantic off SW England - 2,196grt, built 1900, Sir R Ropner & Co, West Hartlepool-reg, Mr W Crighton, Cardiff for Archangel with coal. Captured by U.38 [Max Valentiner] and sunk by gunfire, 30 miles N of The Smalls [L - 30 miles W of; wi - in 52.13N, 05.45W]; two crew lost. One of three Admiralty colliers sunk at the time – see also KIRKBY, THE QUEEN [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

GLOUCESTER [01], light cruiser, 5 August 1914, Escape of German Battlecruiser Goeben - Gloucester detected Goeben in Messina, Sicily in first wartime use of wireless interception by Royal Navy

GLOUCESTER [02], light cruiser, 7 August 1914, Escape of Goeben - Gloucester shadowed Goeben & Breslau off Cape Matapan, Greece

GOBERNADOR BORIES, Admiralty blockship 2,332grt, built 1882, 285ft, Ballenera de Magallanes, Punta Arenas, Chile-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in about 40-60ft in Burra Sound, between Hoy & Graemsay islands [wi - in 58.55.25N, 03.18.33W]. Wreck lies in 50ft, and is described as one of the favourite dives of Scapa [Lr/D/wi/www]

GOLDFINCH, destroyer, 18 February 1915, Orkneys - H-class, 970t, 1910, 2-4in/2-12pdr/2-21in tt, 27kts, 72 crew, Pendant No. H.44, 2nd DF Grand Fleet, Lt-Cdr Reginald Stone. Night of 18th/19th - Ran aground in dense fog on Start Point, Sanday Is [wi - in 59.17N, 02.25W], abandoned as a wreck; no lives lost. Sold for BU 4/19, possibly to Metal Industries. See also SPARROWHAWK [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dx/gf/ke/wi]

GOLIATH [01], battleship, 28 November 1914, German East Africa Campaign - German shipping and harbour installations destroyed at Dar-es-Salaam; old battleship Goliath, old light cruiser Fox, gunboat Duplex, ex-German tug Helmuth took part, bombardment continued on the 30th. For his part in the operations at Dar-es-Salaam, Cdr Henry Peel Ritchie of HMS Goliath was awarded the Victoria Cross, the first naval one of World War 1 [DX]

GOLIATH [02], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

GOLIATH [03], battleship – see ALBION, battleship, 2 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

GOLIATH [04], battleship, 13 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - Canopus-class, 14,300t, 1898, 4-12in/12-6in/12-12pdr/4-18in tt, 18 kts, c750 crew, Pendant No. N.54, 8th BS Channel Fleet 8/14, later to Mediterranean, Capt Thomas Shelford. French forces under heavy attack inland of S-Beach, night of 12th/13th, Goliath and Cornwallis providing gunfire support, both anchored in exposed position in Morto Bay off Seddul Bahr village, Cornwallis astern of Goliath, destroyers Beagle, Bulldog, Pincher, Scorpion, Wolverine on patrol, night very dark, foggy around midnight, attacks were suspected. Turkish destroyer Muavenet-i-Miliet, partly German-manned and commanded by Lt-Cdr Rudoph Firle came down the Dardanelles, avoided Bulldog and Beagle around 0100, spotted the battleships and came round Eski Hissarlik Point under De Totts battery, challenged by Goliath at 0115 but steamed ahead and fired all three torpedo tubes as Goliath opened fire, one torpedo hit abreast fore turret, a second by the foremost funnel, and the third near after turret, ship immediately began listing badly to port and soon on beam ends, turned turtle, floated for a few minutes, then went down bow first; 505 lives lost - 20 officers including her Captain, 479 ratings and 4 canteen staff, 2 ratings DOW [Cn/He/ke - 570 men lost, 180 survivors]. Wolverine and Scorpion tried to cut off the torpedo boat as it headed back up the Straits but failed [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ke/mf; ADM.116/1446]

GOOD HOPE, cruiser – see BATTLE OF CORONEL, 1 November 1914, South East Pacific. Drake-class, 14,150t, 1901, 2-9.2in/16-6in/12-12pdr/2-18in tt, 23kts, c900 crew, Pendant No. P.16, joined 6th CS Grand Fleet 8/14, to South Atlantic, Capt Philip Franklin, flagship Rear-Adm Sir Christopher Cradock. Engaged by Scharnhorst - 8-8.2in guns versus 2-9.2in, third salvo put forward 9.2in out of action followed by serious hits to the forepart, upper bridge and foretop, repeatedly hit amidships setting her on fire, after turret hit twice, large explosion between mainmast and after funnel at 1950, flames reaching 200ft, ship left silent and dead in the water. Von Spee lost contact around 2000 and ordered his light cruisers to search for the two large British ship that were presumably damaged and finish them with torpedoes, Good Hope was not found but went down around this time, her end not seen in the darkness and the driving rain; 926 lives lost - 52 officers, 871 ratings and 3 canteen staff, no survivors. See also MONMOUTH, GLASGOW [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/dk/ke/nb/nh]

GOSHAWK [01], destroyer - see 28 August 1914, BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT. I-class, 990t, 2-4in/2-12pdr/2-21in tt, leader 5th Div, 1st DF, Cdr Herbert Meade, closing the sinking German V.187 at 0850, boats away to rescue the crew. Only 200yds off when the Germans, fearing capture, fired a single shot hitting her in the ward-room, fire re-opened on V.187 which sank at 0910. See also ARETHUSA, LAERTES, LAUREL, LIBERTY [Rn/D/dd/ty]

GOSHAWK [02], destroyer – see ATTACK, destroyer, 11 October 1914, Dutch coast

GOSSAMER, minesweeper– see SKIPJACK, minesweeper, 19 December 1914, North Sea.

GOTHLAND, Admiralty blockship 1,485grt, built 1871, 251ft, Liverpool & Hamburg SS, Liverpool-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Portland, Dorset - final scuttling location not known [Lr/D]

GRAFTON [1], light cruiser – see HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea

GRAFTON [2], light cruiser – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 12 August 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

GRAMPUS, destroyer - see E.15, submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

GRASSHOPPER, destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

GREAT HEART hired drifter, 24 September 1915, Belgian Coast - may be spelt Greatheart or Great Hart, 78grt, built 1911, Inverness-reg INS233, hired 6/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.1395, Dover Patrol, Skipper William Davidson RNR. Sailed with other drifters to screen monitors that were due to carry out a bombardment of Ostend and Zeebrugge - apparently streaming her buoyed nets as protection against submarine attack. Just off Dover, sunk by explosion [He - about 2 miles off harbour entrance; wi - in 51N, 01.20E], cause unknown at the time, and probably considered due to one of her own net mines. Now confirmed mined, laid by UC.6 [Matthias Graf von Schmettow], two days earlier; Skipper and 7 ratings lost. Admiralty yacht Sanda was lost next day as part of the bombardment force [H/L/Rn/C/D/He/dk/dq/un/wi; ADM.1/8434/284]


H

H.1, submarine – see E.12, submarine, 25 October 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

H. C. HENRY, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 28 September 1915, Central Mediterranean - 4,219grt, built 1909, Steamer "H C Henry" Co, Vancouver [BC]-reg, sailing London/Alexandria for Mudros with tar oil. Captured by U.39 [Walter Forstmann], sunk by gunfire 59 miles S 1/2 E of Cape Matapan, Greece [L - 30 miles SW of Cerigotto Is/Anti-Kythera] [H/L/Lr/te/un]

HALCYON, minesweeper – see FIRST BOMBARDMENT OF BRITISH COAST, RAID ON GORLESTON, 3 November 1914

HALLAMSHIRE, Admiralty collier, 19 November 1915, Central Mediterranean - 4,420grt, built 1907, Glasgow-reg, Helmsdale SS, Mr A Clark, armed, Cardiff for Malta/Milo with 5,600t coal. Torpedoed at 1420 by U.34 [Claus Rücker] but did not sink fast enough, shelled and sank by 1700, 20 miles SW by S from Cerigotto Is/Anti-Kythera, between Greece and Crete [L - in 35.38N, 23.01E]; survivors picked up by French destroyer [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un]

HAMPSHIRE, armoured cruiser, 1 July 1915, North Sea - Devonshire-class, 7th CS Grand Fleet. Reported a torpedo fired at her in Moray Firth, confirmed as attacked by U.25. Twelve destroyers and local patrol vessels sent to hunt for the attacker, but without success [Cn/ge/gf]

HARDINGE [01] [RIM], armed troopship – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

HARDINGE [02] [RIM], armed troopship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal - 7,457tons, built 1900, c8-4in/8-3pdr, Cdr T Linberry, taking part in defence of Suez Canal, providing naval support for British-Indian counter-attack 3 miles S of Tussum. Under fire from 4in and heavier guns from 0700, could not locate them, so concentrated firing on infantry. About 0825 both funnels damaged and ship so badly hit, had to slip and move out of channel into Lake Timsah to avoid sinking in the channel; no one killed [Rn/D]

HARDY, destroyer- see GERMAN RAID on HARTLEPOOL, SCARBOROUGH and WHITBY, 16 December 1914. K-class, c1,300t, 3-4in/2-21in tt. Lt-Cdr L Crabbe. Wireless shot away, holed on waterline, bridge wrecked, severely damaged by 0600 with steering gear disabled and had to turn out of line, managed to proceed at 0620 and limped into port escorted by Spitfire; 2 ratings killed, 1 officer and 14 men wounded. See also AMBUSCADE, LYNX [Rn/D/ap/dk/gf]

HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea - Edgar-class light cruisers Crescent [flag, Adm de Chair], Edgar, Endymion, Theseus, Hawke and possibly Grafton of 10th CS, detached from Northern Patrol and patrolling a line between Peterhead and the Naze. HMS Crescent left for Cromarty for engine repairs and to coal, weather too bad to transfer flag and command passed to Edgar. Around 1320 on the 15th, Theseus, 80 miles offshore and zigzagging at 13kts sighted a torpedo passing 200yds astern in 57.50N, 00.33E, believed fired by U.9 although U.17 was in the area. Edgar wirelessed all ships to steam northwest at full speed, but no reply received from Hawke. Adm Jellicoe, C-in-C ordered out flotilla leader Swift and a division of destroyers for Hawke's last reported position in 57.47N, 00.12E. By this time Hawke had been lost:

HAWKE, 7,350t, 1891, 2-9.2in/10-6in/12-6pdr/4-18in tt, 20kts, c544 crew, Pendant No. A9, Capt Hugh Williams, five cruisers spread line abreast at 10 miles intervals, Endymion to starboard and Hawke next. At 0930 Hawke signalled Endymion to close so mails could be collected from her, both stopped and Hawke sent a boat. Endymion then passed under Hawke's stern to close the other ships, Hawke rehoisted her boat and got up to 12 knots to regain station. About 1030, there was an explosion starboard side abreast foremost funnel, torpedoed once by U.9 [Otto Weddigen], engine stopped, and started to list to starboard, only time for two boats to be lowered, turned over after 15min, floated bottom up for a few minutes then went down bow first in 57.40N, 00.13E [dx - 60 miles E of Kinnaird Head]; 527 lives lost - 26 officers, 498 ratings, 1 DOW and 2 canteen staff [Cn - 524 lost; bi - 525; He/ke - 500]. Of the 70 survivors, 21 were rescued from a life-raft by Swift and taken into Scapa Flow on the 17th, and one boat, which drifted away with 3 officers and 46 men [ss - gunner and 49 men], was picked up five hours later by Norwegian SS Modesta, landed at Aberdeen [ss - Peterhead] also on the 17th. The second boat was crushed by the overturning ship [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bi/dk/dx/ge/gf/ke/ss; ADM.1/8398/374, ADM.1/8398/377, ADM.137/997]

HELMUTH [01], armed tug – see PEGASUS, 3rd class cruiser, 20 September 1914, German East Africa

HELMUTH [02], armed tug – see GOLIATH, battleship 28 November 1914, German East Africa Campaign

HELPER, paddle minesweeper, June 1915, English Channel - ex-tug, 173grt, built 1873, hired 1/4/15. June - In collision with armed trawler Fane 269grt off Portland [D/gr]

HERMES, light cruiser, 31 October 1914, Dover Straits - sometimes classed as seaplane carrier, Highflyer-class, 5,650t, 1898, 11-6in/9-12pdr/2-18in tt, 20kts, 450 crew, converted at Chatham in 1913 to depot ship for Naval Wing of Royal Flying Corps, subsequently Royal Naval Air Service with launching platform forward & stowage platform aft for 3 seaplanes, although only 2 carried, commissioned 5/13, after trials and manoeuvres, paid off 12/13. Equipment reinstalled 8/14, recommissioned as RNAS transport and supply ship 31/8, serving with Nore Command, Capt Charles Lambe. Arrived at Dunkirk from Portsmouth the previous evening to unload seaplanes, departed morning of 31st, but at 0930 ordered to return because of submarine alarm. Ten minutes later, destroyer Liberty reported Hermes had been torpedoed twice by U.27 [Bernd Wegener], sank two hours later near Outer Ruytingen Bank, 8 miles WNW of Calais [wi - in 51N, 01.20E]; 1 officer and 20 ratings lost [Cn/ge - 22 lost; He/ke - 44 casualties, 400 survivors]. Short Folder seaplane No.82 sank with her, but others were taken off by ferry Invicta [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bt/dk/dx/ge/ke/wi; ADM.1/8401/402]

HEROIC [01], armed boarding steamer, 25 June 1915, Aegean Sea - 1,869grt, built 1906, hired 18/11/14, 2-12pdr, believed blockading Turkish coast, lowered two boats under command of Lt Macdonald and Sub-Lt William to examine five schooners at 1350. Maxim fire opened up from shore on the boats at 1400, boats recalled and covering fire given, men picked up and boats hoisted in around 1430, no doctor aboard, headed back and anchored by HMS Vengeance to transfer wounded; 3 ratings DOW [pg - 12 wounded, AB Wilson died]. "Dardanelles: A Midshipman's Diary" reports for 26 June that "several Greek schooners have been seized and brought in [to Mudros] recently by our cruisers and boarding steamers in charge of a midshipman" [D/da/dk/pg]

HEROIC [02], armed boarding steamer – see B.6, submarine, 16 August 1915, Eastern Mediterranean

HIBERNIA, battleship – see ALBEMARLE, battleship, 6/7 November 1915, off northern Scotland

HIGHFLYER, light cruiser, 26 August 1914, Atlantic off NW Africa - Highflyer-class, 5,650t, 11-6in/9-12pdr/2-18in tt, 9th CS, Capt Buller, German auxiliary cruiser Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse reported at anchor off Spanish Saharan colony of Rio de Oro, Highflyer arrived to find the raider coaling from two colliers in Spanish waters, gave her time to surrender or put to sea. Fired shell at 1510 to which Kaiser Wilhelm replied, then opened fire, the German ceased action by 1645, boats sent off with the crew, shortly sank in shallow water [kp - off Durnford Point in 23.34N, 16.02W], Highflyer lightly damaged and continued in operation; one man killed, five slightly wounded [Rn/D/dk/kp]

HILDEBRAND, armed merchant cruiser – see CLAN MACNAUGHTON, armed merchant cruiser, 3 February 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland

HIMALAYA, armed merchant cruiser – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

HOGUE, cruiser – see 22 September 1914, Sinking of Cruisers Aboukir, Hogue, Cressy by U.9, North Sea. Built 1900, Pendant No. N.59, Capt Wilmot Nicholson. Ordered Cressy to look out for submarines, stopped and sent off boats to rescue Aboukir survivors, almost immediately hit portside by two torpedoes, started to sink by stern, quarterdeck awash in 5min, submarine broached to and fired on, Hogue rolled over on her side within 10min, abandon ship ordered and sank, her boats now headed for Cressy with Aboukir's survivors; 376 lives lost - 11 officers, 1 more DOW, and 361 ratings, and 1 canteen staff. . See also ABOUKIR, CRESSY [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ge/ke/ty; ADM.137/47]

HOLLYHOCK, fleet sweeping sloop – see LILAC, fleet sweeping sloop, 18 August 1915, North Sea

HOOD, Admiralty blockship, 4 November 1914, Admiralty blockships - Admiralty accounts refer to 49 merchantmen bought during the war for use as blockships for a total sum of £424,249. Dittmarr lists 41, nine of which were not expended for this purpose. An additional one is listed in Colledge, three more in “Wreck Index”, four have been located at Gallipoli, two ex-dummy battleships were expended as blockships and a possible one more gives a total of 43 merchant ships. Apart from ex-battleship Hood, six old cruisers were expended during the Zeebrugge/Ostend raids. HOOD, Admiralty blockship, 4 November 1914, English Channel - ex-turret battleship, 14,150t, 1891, 380ft, removed from effective list 1911, fitted with first experimental anti-torpedo bulges 1913, on sale list 8/14. Scuttled in South Ship Channel, Portland Harbour, Dorset to fill gap in the defences [wi - in 50.34.08N, 02.25.12W]. Wreck lies upside down in around 50ft, with keel only a few feet below the water at low tide [C/Cn/pt/wi]

HOPE, destroyer – see MONARCH, dreadnought, 27 December 1914, North Sea.

HORNET, destroyer – see ARGYLL, cruiser, 28 October 1915, North Sea

HUMBER [01], monitor, 13 October 1914, Dover Straits - Humber and Severn, river monitors, Humber-class, Dover Patrol, ordered to escort transports back from Ostend, evacuation had already taken place and turned back for Dover. Attacked at close range by U-boat half way across, but missed [Rn/Mn/ge]

HUMBER [02], monitor – see ATTENTIVE, light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast

HUMBER [03], monitor, 6 November 1914, Belgian Coast Operations - Bombardment of Westend and Lombartzyde by monitor Humber and old gunboat Bustard

HUNGARIAN, hired trawler – see G.M.V., Admiralty drifter, 13 March 1915, North Channel

HUSSAR, minesweeper, ex-gunboat - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

HYACINTH [01], light cruiser, 14 April 1915, German East Africa Campaign - German supply ship Kronburg, ex-British SS Rubens detained at Hamburg 8/14, now carrying supplies for light cruiser Königsberg still lying in the Rufuji River delta, sunk by Hyacinth in the Indian Ocean

HYACINTH [02], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

HYDRA, destroyer – see FEARLESS, scout cruiser, 10 September 1915, North Sea

HYTHE, auxiliary screw minesweeper,  28 October 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - [J - paddle], ex-railway packet, 509/1905, London-reg, South Eastern & Chatham Railway Companies Managing Committee, hired 18/10/14, 1 or 2-12pdr, Pendant No. T.10, Lt-Cdr Arthur Bird RNR. Probably night of 28/29th - In collision with armed boarding steamer Sarnia, 1,498grt, sank near Cape Helles, Dardanelles; 9 ratings, 2 MN lost [He – 10 crew and 145 troops lost] [+J/Lr/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/dx; ADM.137/3136]


I

IMMINGHAM, store carrier, 6 June 1915, Aegean Sea - ex-passenger steamer, 2,083grt, built 1906, Great Central Railway, Grimsby-reg, hired as accommodation ship 10/14, RFA store carrier from 4/15, Pendant No. Y8.50, described as "errand boy" between Imbros island and Mudros during Gallipoli campaign. In collision with hired screw minesweeper Reindeer 1,101grt, sank off Mudros, Lemnos island. Owners claimed £100,000 compensation but only awarded £45,000 by the Admiralty [H/Lr/C/Cn/D/ns]

IMPLACABLE, battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

INAWILLIAM, hired trawler, 5 June 1915, Atlantic off SW Ireland - or Ina Williams, 337grt, built 1913, hired 4/15, 1-12pdr, Sub-Lt Nettleingham RNR, steaming towards Cahirmore Signal Station, few miles west of Berehaven. Large submarine came to the surface 1 or 2 miles away on port beam, Inawilliam, now 11 miles W of Mizen Head, headed for the U-boat which fired 4 or 5 rounds, then a torpedo which just missed, trawler fired back, hit her once or twice as she submerged and escaped [D/Mn]

INDEFATIGABLE, battlecruiser, 3 November 1914, Dardanelles - In advance of a declaration of war, an Anglo-French Squadron bombarded the Turkish outer forts, British battlecruisers Indefatigable, Indomitable and French battleships Suffren, Vérité took part.

INDIA [01], armed merchant cruiser, 14 June 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland - 10th CS, heading for Clyde to coal. Torpedo fired at her in 59.20N, 07.52W, missed [D/Mn]

INDIA [02], armed merchant cruiser, 8 August 1915, Norwegian Sea - ex-passenger ship, 7,940grt, built 1896, 18 kts, Peninsular & Oriental Steam Navigation Co, Greenock-reg, hired 13/3/15, Pendant No. M.81, 10th CS, Northern Patrol, c300 crew, Cdr William Kennedy i/c, master, Lt Richard Groundwater RNR. On patrol off Norwegian coast to intercept iron ore carriers sailing from Narvik for Germany via Rotterdam, with attached hired trawlers Saxon and Newland also 10th CS for inshore duties. Swedish SS Gloria sighted at 0830, India intercepted, boarded and searched her, details of Gloria wirelessed in. Other ships were sighted and followed, at noon ordered to send Gloria into Kirkwall, and proceeded to search for her. Now 1740, alarm gong sounded, and torpedo track seen approaching, could not be avoided and struck starboard side aft near No.3 gun, fired by U.22 [Bruno Hoppe], ship immediately started to settle by stern. Of the four starboard and three port boats kept lowered for such an emergency, six were successfully manned but with ship's way still on, a port boat capsized and on the starboard side the boats were fouled or stove in, ship sank in five minutes, 6-7 miles NNW of Heligver Light near Bodo [te - in 67.30N, 13.20E; ke - mined off Helligvaer/Hellevoer island]; 121 lives lost - 11 officers, 53 ratings including some Royal Marines and 57 MMR, number of crew buried ashore in Norway [Mn - 9 officers and 107 men lost, with 189 men saved including the captain; of the latter, 19 officers and 138 men either went down with the ship and came up again or had to dive over the side before rescue; He – 166 lives lost; ke/wd - 10 officers and 150 ratings lost, 141 survivors including Cdr Kennedy], survivors picked up by Swedish SS Gotaland and HM Trawler Saxon [believed Saxon II], and landed in Norway where they were interned [H/J/Mn/C/Cn/D/He/bi/dk/gf/ke/po/te/un/wd; ADM.137/185, ADM.1/8429/229, ADM.1/116/1440]

INDOMITABLE [01], battlecruiser – see INDEFATIGABLE, battlecruiser, 3 November 1914, Dardanelles.

INDOMITABLE [02], battlecruiser - see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915.

INDOMITABLE [03], battlecruiser, 10 March 1915, North Sea - Invincible-class, Rosyth-based 3rd BCS, sailing Scapa Flow for Rosyth. Sighted submarine getting into position to fire off Montrose at dusk, turned and forced the U-boat to dive [Rn/Cn]

INDRANI, squadron supply ship, 27 June 1915, St George's Channel - 3,640grt, built 1888, Donaldson Line [Donaldson Bros, managers], Glasgow-reg, hired 4/8/14 as RFA, probably not commissioned, Pendant No. Y9.7, sailing Glasgow for Montreal with general cargo. Captured by U.24 [Rudolf Schneider], sunk by torpedo 40 miles W of The Smalls, E of Milford Haven [L/te/un/wi - 36 miles SW of Tuskar Rock, off Rosslare; L/te/wi - also in 51.45N, 06.50W] [H/L/Lr/C/D/te/un/wi]

INDUSTRY, store carrier, 5 August 1915, North Sea - 1,460 tons/497grt, 1901, Admiralty-owned. In collision with Dutch SS Zeeland off Wold LV. Sunk c19 October 1918 [D/gr/ms]

INFLEXIBLE [01], battlecruiser – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914. Invincible-class, 20,080, 8-12in/16-4in/4-18in tt, Capt Phillimore. Initially ranged on Scharnhorst, hit three times, little damage; 1 rating lost, 2 slightly wounded. See also CARNARVON, CORNWALL, GLASGOW, INVINCIBLE, KENT [Rn/D/dk/nb/nh]

INFLEXIBLE [02], battlecruiser – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

INFLEXIBLE [03], battlecruiser – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows. Capt Phillimore, on station in Line A since 1430. Mined on starboard bow by the forward submerged flat around 1611, immediately flooded, ship began to list and settle by the head, made for Tenedos and water continued to rise, reached there with difficulty an hour and a half after the explosion, anchored on north side of island; 3 officers, 31 ratings and 1 civilian contractor lost including every man in the forward flat killed, wounded taken off in a cutter during the journey to Tenedos. Towed to Malta and repaired by May. See also IRRESISTIBLE, OCEAN [Rn/Cn/dk]

INGLEMOOR, Admiralty collier, 1 July 1915, Atlantic off SW England - one of two auxiliaries captured and sunk by U.39 [Walter Forstmann] off Cornwall. 4,331grt, built 1912, Moor Line [W Runciman & Co], London-reg, Mr A Stonehouse, Barry for Malta with coal and general cargo. Sunk by torpedo 75 miles SW by W of Lizard Point [L - 60 miles SW of]. See also CAUCASIAN [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un]

INVERGYLE, Admiralty collier, 12 March 1915, North Sea - 1,794grt, built 1907, Invergyle SS Co [Stewart & Gray], Glasgow-reg, Mr D Minto, Scapa Flow for Hartlepool in ballast. [te/un - 13th] - Torpedoed by U.23 [Hans Schulthess], sank 12 miles NNE of Tyne estuary [L/wi - 15 miles NNE of, in 55.18.40N, 01.25.44W] [H/L/Mn/Lr/te/un/wi]

INVERLYON, Q-ship, 15 August 1915, North Sea - UB.4 sunk by Q-ship fishing smack lnverlyon off Yarmouth; Inverlyon was not believed damaged in the action [dx]

INVINCIBLE [01], battlecruiser - see 28 August 1914, BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT.

INVINCIBLE [02], battlecruiser – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914. Invincible-class, 20,080, 8-12in/16-4in/4-18in tt, initially ranged on Gneisenau, hit by about 20 mainly 8.2in shells, foremast strut carried away, one 4in gun out of action and one bunker flooded; no killed or wounded. See also CARNARVON, CORNWALL, GLASGOW, INFLEXIBLE, KENT [Rn/D/dk/nb/nh]

IRENE, Trinity House tender, 9 November 1915, North Sea - [J - Admiralty armed yacht], 543grt, built 1890, Corporation of Trinity House, London-reg, on loan to Dover Patrol for anchor work connected with net and mine barrages, Harwich for London in ballast. Mined, laid by UC.1 [Egon von Werner], sank 1 1/2m ESE of Tongue LV, off North Foreland [L/wi - 2 1/2m SE by E of, in 51.29.35N, 01.27.20E]; 21 crew lost including master. Note: only Janes list her as a naval auxiliary, but included her as on naval service [H/J/L/ge/sc/te/un/wi]

IRRESISTIBLE [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

IRRESISTIBLE [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows. Formidable-class, 15,800t, 1898, 4-12in/12-6in/18-12pdr/4-18in tt, 18kts, c780 crew, Pendant No. 64, 5th BS Channel Fleet 8/14, then to Mediterranean, Capt Douglas Dent, with 2nd Division, hit alongside at 1514 by heavy shell from Fort Hamadieh and by 1532 had taken a slight list, drifting with engines stopped about 1615. Mined near Eren Keui Bay [J/C - shore torpedo from White Cliffs battery], exploded under starboard engine-room near centre-line, engine-room quickly flooded, midship bulkhead buckled and port engine-room flooded leaving both engines disabled. Took 7° list to starboard, down by the stern and Turks concentrated fire on her, destroyer Wear and a picket boat came to assist and Ocean was ordered to stand by to tow. As Irresistible could not be saved, abandon ship was ordered under heavy fire causing casualties on deck, but 10 volunteers stayed to get a wire across to Ocean, list increased and ship lay bows on to the Asiatic shore leaving Ocean subjected to cross-fire. The two ship's captains decided to take off the volunteers, Irresistible abandoned at 1750, and Ocean withdrew, the intention being for destroyers and minesweepers to try to save her after dark. According to the Turks, she drifted back towards the Narrows Forts, was fired on and sank about 1930 [He – about 2000; da - now partly salvaged, lays in 40.04N, 26.20E]; 4 officers killed and one DOW, 7 ratings killed and one more DOW, only three men got out of the rapidly flooded engine room, 28 surviving officers and 582 men taken off by Wear [ke - 200 casualties, 610 survivors]. See also INFLEXIBLE, OCEAN [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/da/dk/ke/mf; ADM.116/1443]

IVANHOE, hired trawler, 3 November 1914, North Sea - 190grt, built 1898, Grimsby-reg GY902, United Steam Fishing, hired 10/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel [wi - minesweeper], Admiralty No.664, Skipper J Freer. Wrecked in Firth of Forth [He - patrol vessel, stranded four cables from Martello tower, Black Rock, off Leith, Firth of Forth in poor weather; wi - from Lowestoft for minesweeping and return, wrecked near Black Rock, Leith, in 55.59.30N, 03.10W]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/dk/wi; ADM.137/72]

IVY [01], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

IVY [02], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CHALLENGER, light cruiser 27 September 1914, West African Campaign.


J

JACKAL, destroyer – see ARGYLL, cruiser, 28 October 1915, North Sea

JAPAN, hired trawler, 16 August 1915, North Sea - 205grt, built 1904, H L Taylor, Grimsby-reg GY28, hired 1915 [D - 8/14; He - 1914] as minesweeper, Admiralty No.42, Lt Richard Harcourt RNR i/c, Skipper Arthur Barber RNR, believed Harwich-based, sailed from Lowestoft or Harwich, sweeping with HMT Touchstone for UC-laid mines, both vessels clearing sweeps at 1915. Winch boat Japan heaved in sweep wire and saw it was fouled by a mine [laid by UC.6, Matthias Graf von Schmettow] only 30yd away, by the time the winch-man’s warning had been heard and acted on, the mine was only 3-4yd distant, insufficient headway was kept on using the trawler’s engines, mine blew up port-side between bridge and foremast, sinking her within 30sec off S end of Shipwash shoal, off Harwich [wi - three entries - in 51.53.28N, 01.34.29E, in 51.57N, 01.36.45E and in 51.52.40N, 01.37E]; five ratings killed [He – 4 killed], two of the bodies were picked up by HMT Lord Roberts and Touchstone and landed at HMS Ganges, survivors rescued from the water within 15min [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3124]

JASON, minesweeper– see SKIPJACK, minesweeper, 19 December 1914, North Sea.

JASPER, Admiralty trawler, 26 August 1915, North Sea - 221grt, built 1912, previously Kingston Steam Trawling, purchased by Admiralty pre-war, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.164, commissioned as minesweeper, Lt William St Clair Fleming RNR. Taking part in sweeping field laid by German auxiliary minelayer Meteor in Moray Firth, mined at 0935 and sank quickly [He - 58.13N, 02.22W; wi - in 58N, 03W]; 8 ratings killed [He – 7 died; wi - 11] [H/Mn/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.1/8431/250]

JAVELIN [01], Admiralty trawler – see LIGHTNING, destroyer, 30 June 1915, North Sea

JAVELIN [02], Admiralty trawler, 17 October 1915, North Sea - 205grt, built 1913, Aberdeen-registered, purchased pre-war as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.21, believed Harwich-based, Skipper Frederick Banks RNR. Sweeping about 3 miles S of Longsand light vessel, mined at 1615, laid by UC.3 [Erwin Wassner] [He – probably UC.6], sank off the Longsand, off Clacton [wi - 3.75 miles SE of, in 51.44.30N, 01.42W]; one rating lost [H/C/D/Mn/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/165]

JED, destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows; also OCEAN, battleship.

JOHN G WATSON, hired trawler, 31 October 1915, off NW Scotland - 196grt, built 1910, Aberdeen-reg A.327, R Irvin & Sons, hired 1915 [D - 11/1914] as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Pendant No. 427, [wi - E Baker, Capt]. Escorting oil tanker Rosalind from Stornoway, collided with her and sank at Stornoway, Isle of Lewis [wi - in 58N, 06W]; no lives lost; crew rescued by escort trawler Invicta [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/168]

JOHN SHERBURN, Admiralty trawler, Dover Straits, 6 February 1915 - 244grt, built 1902 [wi - 1915], Humber Steam Trawling, Hull-reg H644, hired 1915 [D - 12/14] as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.815, Dover Patrol, Lt Walter Smith RNR [wi - S Carnassa, Captain]. [Other sources – 6 March] - Stranded in poor weather in St Margaret's Bay, near Dover, wrecked [wi - in 51.07N, 01.27E]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dq/dk/hw/wi; ADM.137/90]

JUNO, light cruiser, 13 August 1915, Persian Gulf - ex-2nd-class cruiser, Eclipse-class, 5,600t, 5-6in/6-4.7in, was 11th CS, arrived Persian Gulf in July, Capt D Wake. Shore party casualties were recorded for August. Apparently German-inspired trouble led to decision to occupy the whole of the island of Bushire on the Persian side of the Gulf, carried out by a small joint naval/army force commanded by Capt Wake on 13th/14th; 4 ratings killed on 13th, 1 officer DOW on 14th, 1 rating on 16th, ship presumably not damaged [Rn/Cn/dk]


K

KASSALA, collier – see T.B. 064, torpedo boat, 21 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

KAVIRONDO, lake steamer - see WINIFRED, lake steamer, 7 March 1915, German East Africa Campaign

KENNET [01], destroyer, 23 August 1914, Yellow Sea - E-class, 615t, 4-12pdr/2-18in tt, China Squadron, present at Japanese siege of Tsingtau. Tried to cut off German destroyer S.90 off Tsingtau at sunset, hit, one gun put out of action; 3 men killed, one DOW, believed four more wounded [Rn/Cn/D/dk/dx]

KENNET [02], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

KENT [01], cruiser – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914. Kent-class, 9,800t, 14-6in/10-12pdr/2-18in tt, Capt Allen. In action with Nurnberg, hit 38 times, wireless room wrecked but little structural damage because of armour; 5 ratings lost, three more DOW [nb - 4 killed, 12 wounded]. See also CARNARVON, CORNWALL, GLASGOW, INFLEXIBLE, INVINCIBLE [Rn/D/dk/nb/nh]

KENT [02], cruiser, 14 March 1915, SE Pacific – German light cruiser Dresden discovered at Chilean island of Mas a Fuera, Juan Fernandez group by armoured cruiser Kent, light cruiser Glasgow & armed merchant cruiser Orama, shelled, then scuttled [dx]

KINFAUNS CASTLE, armed merchant cruiser – see FOX, light cruiser 12 January 1915, German East Africa Campaign.

KING ORRY [01], armed boarding vessel, June 1915, off W Scotland - 1,877grt, built 1913, hired 29/10/14. June - Ran aground in the Sound of Islay, refloated [D/gr]

KING ORRY [02], armed boarding vessel – see CHRISTOPHER, destroyer, 23 September 1915, North Sea

KIRKBY, Admiralty collier, 17 August 1915, St George's Channel/Atlantic off SW England - 3,034grt, built 1891, Sir R Ropner & Co, West Hartlepool-reg, Mr W Hewison, Barry for Manchester with coal. Captured by U.38 [Max Valentiner] and torpedoed 23 miles W by S of Bardsey Isle [L/wi - 20 miles WSW of, in 52.30N, 05.10W]. One of three Admiralty colliers sunk at the time – see also GLENBY, THE QUEEN [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

KNARSDALE, Admiralty collier, 21 December 1915, North Sea - 1,641grt, built 1896, Glasgow-reg, Scandinavian Shipping, 20 crew, Mr J Tinmouth, Blyth for Sheerness with coal. Mined at 1700, laid by UC.7 [Georg Haag], sank at once 2 3/4m E by S of Orford Ness, Suffolk [L - 3 miles E by S of; wi - in 52.05.14N, 01.38.50E]; one crew drowned, three injured, survivors landed at Yarmouth [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

KOORAH, hired trawler – see MANX HERO, Admiralty trawler, 10 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign.


L

LACONIA, armed merchant cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

LADY CRUNDALL, tug – see LEVEN, destroyer, 8 September 1915, Dover Straits

LADY ISMAY, paddle minesweeper, 21 December 1915, North Sea - ex-excursion steamer, 495grt, built 1911, Cardiff-reg, P & A Campbell, hired 4/11/14, 2-6pdr, Admiralty No.186, with Grimsby paddle minesweeper unit, operations area between Humber & Belgian coast, Sub-Lt Bernard Hawken RNR i/c, Skipper J W Knight, sailed Harwich in the morning with 6 other paddle minesweepers to sweep area to the SW. Visibility poor around noon, three of the vessels separated and left for Harwich, wireless signal to the other four including Lady Ismay not received, they slipped sweeps at 1500 and in order Westward Ho, Cambridge, Lady Ismay, Glen Avon headed for Longsand LV, off Clacton, Essex. [J/dx - 21/12/17] - First two paddlers passed the LV on the starboard hand but tide forced Lady Ismay to pass on port hand, set course for the LV, at around 1540 mined amidships beneath forward bunker and sank within a minute [J/dx - near the Galloper; He – 1 mile NW of LV; un - LV S40°E 5 cables; wi - between Longsand Head and the Galloper, in 51.45N 01.49E;]. Mine laid some days earlier by UC.3 [Erwin Wassner]; 17 ratings, 2 MN lost, only those on deck survived including the mate, she went down so quickly survivors stepped into the lifeboats, Glen Avon just astern stopped and rescued some of the men with her boats, the other two turned back, Cambridge also lowered her boats, picked up survivors and destroyed confidential papers floating on the water [H/J/L/Lr/Cn/D/He/dk/do/dx/ge/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3128]

LADY IVEAGH, Admiralty collier, 24 December 1915, English Channel - 2,286grt, built 1892, Dublin-reg, Lady Iveagh SS. Wrecked at entrance to St Valery of Cayaux, probably the rocks off St Valery-en-Caux between Dieppe and Fecamp. Note: St Valery-sur-Somme is on the S bank of the Somme estuary, Cayeux or Cayeux-sur-Mer just S of the estuary [H/Lr]

LADYSMITH, hired drifter – see FERNDALE, hired drifter, 27 December 1915, St George's Channel

LAERTES, destroyer - see 28 August 1914, BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT. Lt-Cdr Malcolm Goldsmith. One of four L-class destroyers of 4th Div, 3rd DF, c1,200t, 3-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, three out of four of which were were badly hit by well-aimed fire from Mainz around 1210. Last destroyer in the division, hit by all four shells from Mainz' salvo, boilers severely damaged, lost all water and came to a complete standstill, eventually got under way; 2 ratings killed, 6 wounded. See also ARETHUSA, GOSHAWK, LAUREL, LIBERTY [Rn/D/dd/dk/ty]

LAFOREY, destroyer – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

LAMA, armed boarding steamer, 16 October 1915, Red Sea - on patrol against contraband smuggling, in action. Able Seaman John Corlett died [dk]

LANCE, destroyer – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 17 October 1914, Action off the Texel.

LANDRAIL [01], destroyer – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 24 March 1915, North Sea.

LANDRAIL [02], destroyer – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 24 April 1915, North Sea.

LAPLAND, Admiralty blockship, 1,234grt, built 1890, 256ft, Liverpool & Hamburg SS Co, Liverpool-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.3 Barrier, East Weddel Sound, between Burray & Glims Holm islands [wi - in 58.52.17N, 02.54.47W]. Now incorporated in Churchill Barrier [Lr/D/wi]

LARK [01], destroyer, 6 August 1914, North Sea - L-class, c965t. Damaged when Amphion blew up, 4in shell exploded on her, killing her sole German prisoner and wounding two of her seamen [He - both seamen were killed]. See also AMPHION, LINNET [He/dk]

LARK [02], destroyer – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

LAUREL,destroyer - see 28 August 1914, BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT. Cdr Frank Rose. One of four L-class destroyers of 4th Div, 3rd DF, c1,200t, 3-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, three out of four of which were were badly hit by well-aimed fire from Mainz around 1210. Fired two torpedoes, turned away and very badly hit by a salvo, one shell in the engine-room killed 4 men and did much damage, another struck near foremost gun and killed 3 more, third hit aft, detonated lyddite shells in the ready racks, put after gun out of action and damaged the after funnel so much the ship was hidden in a dense cloud of smoke. Although under fire, the ship continued to fight and then with damaged engines, boilers and funnel limped off to be towed home; 1 officer, 10 ratings killed, CO continued to fight the ship although seriously wounded in his leg by the third shell. See also ARETHUSA, GOSHAWK, LAERTES, LIBERTY [Rn/D/dd/dk/ty]

LAWFORD, destroyer – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

LAWRENCE [01] [RIM], troopship – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 21 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

LAWRENCE [02] [RIM], troopship – see ESPIEGLE sloop, 4 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

LAWRENCE [03] [RIM], troopship – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

LEANDROS, hired trawler, 6 August 1915, North Sea - [L/Lr/D/dq - Leander; D - but renamed Leandros], 276grt, built 1907, Lindsey Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY.260, hired 8/14 as Leander, minesweeper, Admiralty No.18, Dover Patrol, Skipper Walter Richmond RNR. Mined, laid by UC.5 [Herbert Pustkuchen] three days earlier, sank off North Knock Sand Buoy, off Thames Estuary [wi - in 51.43N, 01.38E]; 7 ratings lost [He – 5 died] [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8429/223]

LEDA, minesweeper, 17 October 1914, off Orkneys - ex-Alarm-class torpedo gunboat. Entering Scapa Flow and reported torpedoes fired at her, subsequently found to have been a destroyers' accidental discharge [Mn/gf]

LEGION, destroyer – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 17 October 1914, Action off the Texel.

LEMNOS, Admiralty collier, 16 December 1915, North Sea - 1,530grt, built 1880, Dundee-reg, Lawside Shipping, 19 crew, Mr G Hadden, Leith for Rouen with coal. Wrecked off Teesmouth [wi - stranded 1 1/2m SE of South Gare entrance, in 54.38N, 01.06W] [H/Lr/wi]

LENNOX [01], destroyer – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 17 October 1914, Action off the Texel.

LENNOX [02], destroyer – see COMET, destroyer, 6 May 1915, North Sea

LEONADIS, destroyer – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

LEOPARD, destroyer – see FIRST BOMBARDMENT OF BRITISH COAST, RAID ON GORLESTON, 3 November 1914

LEVEN, destroyer, 8 September 1915, Dover Straits - C-class, 420t, Dover Patrol, dark night. In collision with transport carrying 2,000 troops, bow flattened, found drifting broadside in heavy swell in the direction of Boulogne by destroyer Viking, taken in tow stern-first into Dover assisted by destroyer Tartar and tug Lady Crundall [Cn/D/dp/gr]

LEVIATHAN, armoured cruiser, 9 March 1915, North Sea - Drake-class, was 6th CS Grand Fleet, now ordered to Rosyth prior to becoming flagship North American Station, zig-zagging near Bell Rock around 1730. Torpedo fired by U.12, missed [Rn/Cn/D/gf]

LEWIS PELLY [01], armed launch – see OCEAN, battleship 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

LEWIS PELLY [02], armed launch – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 21 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

LEWIS PELLY [03], armed launch - see ESPIEGLE sloop, 4 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

LEWIS PELLY [04], armed launch – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

LIBERTY [01], destroyer - see 28 August 1914, BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT. Lt-Cdr Nigel Barttelot. One of four L-class destroyers of 4th Div, 3rd DF, c1,200t, 3-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, three out of four of which were were badly hit by well-aimed fire from Mainz around 1210. Next astern of Laurel and partly hidden by Laurel's smoke, fired her torpedoes, turned away and hit on the bridge by a shell which brought down the mast, smashed the searchlight and killed the CO and a signalman, first lieutenant took over and continued firing on Mainz until she disappeared in the mist; commanding officer and 7 ratings killed. Next in line was Lysander, salvo missed, fired her torpedoes at Mainz, then turned away to attack another German cruiser, either Stettin or Strassburg. See also ARETHUSA, GOSHAWK, LAERTES, LAUREL [Rn/D/dd/dk/ty]

LIBERTY [02], destroyer – see METEOR, destroyer, BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915

LIBERTY [03], destroyer, 19 June 1915, North Sea - L-class, 3rd DF, with Harwich Force on patrol for Zeppelins attacking England. Liberty stopped to pick up a dog that had fallen overboard, bombed and nearly hit by a German seaplane [Cn/ty]

LIBRA, hired trawler – see LIGHTNING, destroyer, 30 June 1915, North Sea

LIGHTNING, destroyer, 30 June 1915, North Sea - A-class, 320t, 1895, 112pdr/56pdr/218in tt, 27kts, Pendant No. N.23, Nore Local Defence Flotilla, Lt James Cavendish. Floating mine spotted by destroyer Vulture in the morning near Kentish Knock LV in Thames estuary, and more reported in the afternoon by the light vessel. Vulture and Lightning ordered out to sink them, three were exploded around 2000, and as the destroyers searched for more, Lightning suffered a large explosion which lifted her out of the water and broke her back. Mined, laid by UC.1 [Egon von Werner] that morning, forepart sank off Kentish Knock LV [wi - in 51.04.22N, 01.19.02E; dx - off Wielingen LV, Zeebrugge]; 15 ratings lost [He – 14 died]. After part remained afloat, secured between trawlers Javelin and Libra, and taken back to Sheerness, but not worth repairing and broken up. Note: the first submarine mines were laid by UC.1, 2, 3, 11 in the Harwich and Dover areas [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ge/ke/un/wi; ADM.1/8426/185, ADM.1/8426/191]

LILAC, fleet sweeping sloop, 18 August 1915, North Sea - Acacia-class, 1,200t, 2-12pdr/2-3pdr, recently joined Grand Fleet minesweeping flotilla, Lt-Cdr Leslie Fisher, sweeping Meteor-laid field in Cromarty Firth, bad weather with heavy sea running. [sc - 8th] - Stem hit mine, bows blown off nearly as far as bridge, remains hung down from keel, now drew nearly 30-40ft of water, towed by sister-ship Hollyhock into Peterhead, received new bow and rejoined flotilla some months later; 16 ratings lost [Rn/Cn/D/dk/gf/sc]

LIMEWOLD, hired trawler, 8 May 1915, North Sea - 189grt, built 1898, Grimsby-reg, hired 12/14, 1-6pdr, CO on shore sick, Acting Skipper C Bond i/c, on patrol. Shell burst close to the bows at 0430, 20 miles E of Peterhead, submarine spotted one and half miles away right astern and closing fast, turned and returned fire, claimed hit on waterline abreast of conning tower with fifth shot when range down to 600yds, submarine submerged [Mn/D]

LINDSELL, may be spelt Linsdell, Admiralty drifter, 3 September 1914, North Sea - one of two small warships lost in Humber minefield laid by German Nautilus, near Outer Dowsing LV. 88grt, built 1914, Lowestoft-reg LT322, hired 9/14 as minesweeper, unarmed, Admiralty No.224, Skipper Charles Woodgate RNR, from Lowestoft with minesweeping gunboat Speedy, and drifters Wishful and Achievable to sweep Humber minefield. Mined at 1100, stern blown off, bows up-ended and disappeared in a few minutes [wi - armed patrol vessel, lost in 53.30N 01.05E]; skipper, mate, engineer and two deckhands lost, HMS Speedy lowered boats to pick up survivors. See also SPEEDY [H/L/D/ap/dk/wi; ADM.137/3108]

LINKMOOR, Admiralty collier, 20 September 1915, Central Mediterranean - 4,306grt, built 1914, Moor Line, London-reg, sailing Lemnos for Malta with coal. Captured by U.35 [Waldermar Kophamel], sunk by gunfire 50 miles W of Cape Matapan [L/te - in 36.16N, 21.18E] [H/L/Lr/te/un]

LINNET, destroyer, 6 August 1914, North Sea - L-class, c965t. Damaged when Amphion blew up, narrowly missed by a 4in gun thrown in the air, showered with splinters, and struck amidships by one of Amphion's bunker lids, which pierced a boiler room. See also AMPHION, LINNET [dk]

LION, battlecruiser - see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915. Lion-class, 29,680t, 8-13.5in/16-4in/2-21in tt. Hit and damaged a number of times: [1] three German ships firing at her by 0928, shell hit on waterline penetrated the bunkers but damage made good, [2] when Moltke was not engaged, A-turret smashed at 0954 and one gun out of action, [3] 11in shell from Seydlitz pierced the armour at 1001, flooding started and listed to port, [4] hit hard at 1018 - one shell struck the armour below the waterline, drove in several plates and flooded foremost port bunker, and a second pierced armour on waterline, burst in torpedo body room and flooded all adjacent compartments, [5] when Blücher pulled out of line, the other three German ships again concentrated on Lion, hit by numerous shells between 1035 and 1050, armour pierced and more flooding, shell burst in A-turret lobby and started fire, [6] at 1100, shell drove in armour on the waterline abreast one of the boiler rooms, seriously damaged, port engine had to be stopped, light and power failed, list to port increased to 10°, speed dropped to 15kts and Lion dropped astern. She continued for home without Adm Beatty at 12kts, around 1430 speed dropped to 8kts, Indomitable took her in tow and she reached the Firth of Forth at dawn on the 26th; 11 men wounded. Fired a total of 243 heavy shells, hit Blücher once, Derfflinger once, Seydlitz twice, in turn hit by 16-11in and 12in shells, also 1-8.2in. Temporarily repaired at Rosyth, repairs completed by Palmers, returned to service as flagship of new Battle Cruiser force. See also METEOR, TIGER [Rn/Cn/D]

LIVELY, destroyer – see FIRST BOMBARDMENT OF BRITISH COAST, RAID ON GORLESTON, 3 November 1914

LIVERPOOL, light cruiser – see AUDACIOUS, dreadnought, 27 October 1914, off N Ireland. Bristol-class, 1st LCS Grand Fleet, standing by. When Audacious finally blew up, debris landed on Liverpool's deck; one petty officer killed [D/dk/gf]

LIVONIAN, Admiralty blockship, 20 December 1914, Dover Straits - One of two blockships purchased for scuttling in the gap between Admiralty Pier and Southern Breakwater at Dover. 4,017grt, built 1881, 420ft, Glasgow-reg, Allan Line SS, purchased 1914. Shortly after loss of Montrose - Scuttled on west side of entrance. See also MONTROSE [Lr/D/dq]

LOCHWOOD, Admiralty collier, 2 April 1915, English Channel - 2,042grt, built 1900, Constantine & Pickering SS Co, Middlesbrough-reg, 21 crew, Mr T Scott, from Barry with 3,200t coal, steaming at 8kts in misty weather with sea rough, strong WSW wind. U.24 [Rudolf Schneider] sighted on reverse course on port beam about 1 1/4m distant, turned away, hoisted Norwegian ensign and went to full speed. U-boat followed, fired a first torpedo at 1745 and a second at 1815, then approached within hailing distance, ordered Lochwood to stop and gave the crew 10min to abandon ship, while doing so a third torpedo hit port-side abaft the engine-room. U.24 made off at 1900 and Lochwood sank at 1930, 25 miles SW of Start Point, Devon [wi - in 49.54.30N, 04.04W] [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

LONDON, battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

LORD AIREDALE, hired trawler, 18 March 1915, North Sea - 215grt, built 1911, Grimsby-reg, hired 2/15 as minesweeper, Skipper J R Dawson, believed at anchor in "hurricane-force winds". Sank 150yds off the beach at Bridlington, Yorkshire probably after dragging her anchor; Skipper and 11 ratings lost. Salvaged and returned to service [D/dk]

LORD DENMAN, hired trawler, 22 October 1915, Barents Sea - 309grt, built 1914, Hull-reg H118, Yorkshire Steam Fishing, hired 6/15 as minesweeper, 112pdr, Admiralty No.1525, Skipper William Lowrey RNR, one of six Lowestoft-based trawler minesweepers sent to sweep Meteor-laid mines, arrived Alexandrovsk, Murman coast in early July. In collision [He – mined], sank in Barents Sea at 68.04N, 39.34E, half way between Murmansk and Archangel, near Bezimyanni Island, Murmansk Oblask. AMC Arlanza took part in salvaging the wreck on 1st November; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/sc; ADM.1/8441/345]

LORD NELSON [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 4 March 1915, Beach Party landings around Kum Kale.

LORD NELSON [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 6 March 1915, Attack on the Narrows Forts

LORD NELSON [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

LORD NELSON [04], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

LORD NELSON [05], battleship – see ALBION, battleship, 28 April 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

LORD ROBERTS, hired trawler – see JAPAN, hired trawler, 16 August 1915, North Sea

LORENZO, hired trawler, 17 December 1914, Orkneys - 173grt, built 1906, Hellyers Steam Fishing, Hull-reg H865, hired 9/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel, 1 x 6pdr, Admiralty No.603. Wrecked on Kirk rocks in Hoy Sound, W entrance to Scapa Flow between Mainland & Hoy islands; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk]

LORNE, Admiralty blockship, 1,186grt, built 1873, 241ft, T Wilson & Sons, Hull-reg [D - for use at Portland]. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.4 Barrier, in middle of Water Sound, between South Ronaldshay & Burray islands [wi - in 58.50.30N, 02.54.04W]. Wreck dispersed with explosives but much still dries out at low tide [Lr/D/wi]

LOTTIE LEASK, hired drifter, 18 December 1915, Adriatic Sea – in December, the Serbian Army retreating through Albania, were evacuated to the island of Corfu through until 2/16, survivors concentrated there before being sent to Salonika. During much of this time, the Adriatic drifters, now armed with small guns, assisted in the evacuation of the Serbian army and refugees, landing Italian troops at Valona, protecting ships carrying food and supplies for Serbian and Montenegrin troops, and rescuing sinking ships often under fire. Lottie Leask, 94grt, built 1907, North Shields-reg SN184, hired 1/15 as net drifter or tender, Admiralty No.1072, Skipper Robert Aaron George RNR, taking part of evacuation of Durazzo, sailed Brindisi forenoon, now getting dark. Attacked by two submarines [un – U.39, Walter Forstmann] 20 miles WNW of Sasseno Is, off Valona/Vlore, Albania, hit five times, returned fire but abandoned in sinking condition; no lives lost, crew rowed all night, landed on Austrian-held coast, reached Italian lines on 22nd, then marched with Serbians to Valona before going back afloat [H/L/Mn/C/D/He*/ap/dk/un; ADM.137/3605]

LOUIS, destroyer, 31 October 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - L-class, c1,300t, 1913, 34in/1-Maxim mg/421in tt, 29kts, c73 crew, Pendant No. H.07, 3rd DF Harwich on completion, to Mediterranean early 1915, Lt-Cdr Harold Adair- Hall, Gallipoli evacuation plans now being made but likely to be endangered by winter storms, SW storm now blowing, at anchor. Anchors dragged and driven ashore early hours of 31st in Suvla Bay, had to be abandoned, strong SW winds blew for three weeks preventing salvage, reduced to a wreck over the weeks by Turkish artillery; no lives lost [ke - all 102 crew saved] [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/dx/ke; ADM.137/191, ADM.53/47327]

LOYAL, destroyer – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 17 October 1914, Action off the Texel.

LUCANO, Admiralty blockship – see GARGANO, Admiralty blockship, 1915, Central Mediterranean.

LUMINA, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 6 November 1915, Central Mediterranean - 5,950grt, built 1915, Liverpool-reg, H E Moss, armed, Tarakan for Malta with fuel oil. Captured by U.35 [Waldemar Kophamel], sunk by gunfire 120 miles S by E of Cape Martello, S Crete [L - 33.04N, 25.56E; te - in 33.40N, 25.06E] [H/L/Lr/te/un]

LUNDY, hired trawler, 16 August 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - 188grt, built 1908, Hull Steam Fishing & Ice Co, Hull-reg H993, hired 5/15, 13pdr, Admiralty No.1791, patrol vessel, Skipper Henry Charles Taylor RNR, in Suvla Bay, alongside SS Kalyan, taking on ammunition. Anchorage came under fire and master of the Kalyan decided to move position, slowly, with Lundy still secured. As more shells landed, one of them nearby, Kalyan increased speed and turned slightly, Lundy failed to hear the shouted warnings, her stern was dragged under the stern of the larger ship, the hull holed by the propeller, and she flooded and sank; one ratings lost [He - the engineer dying 'of shock' in the process]; crew got away in their boat[s] [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw; ADM.137/3135]

LURCHER [01], destroyer – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

LURCHER [02], destroyer – see C.31, submarine, 4 January 1915, North Sea.

LYDIAN, hired trawler, 18 September 1915, Dover Straits - 244grt, built 1908, S A Laycock, Milford Haven-reg M232, hired 1915 [D - 8/14] as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.162, Dover Patrol, Skipper James Charles Phillips. Mined, believed laid by UC.6 [Matthias Graf von Schmettow] three days before. Sank at 1100 off South Foreland, near Dover, Kent [He - off Leathercoat Point, St Margaret's Bay; wi - in 51.08N, 01.27E]; Skipper and 7 ratings lost, 2 survivors [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8434/279, ADM.137/152]

LYNX [01], destroyer - see GERMAN RAID on HARTLEPOOL, SCARBOROUGH and WHITBY, 16 December 1914. K-class, c1,300t, 3-4in/2-21in tt. Cdr R Parry. Hit several times, not too badly damaged. Unity initially stood by, before she made for Leith for repairs; no lives lost, 1 man wounded. See also AMBUSCADE, HARDY [Rn/D/dk/gf]

LYNX [02], destroyer, 9 August 1915, North Sea - K-class, c1300t, 1913, 3-4in/2-21in tt with 4 torpedoes, 29kts, 73 crew, Pendant No. H.71, 4th DF Grand Fleet, Cdr John Cole, on patrol with two other destroyers in Moray Firth, SE of Helmsdale. Around 0600 or 0630, explosion under No.1 boiler room, bridge area destroyed and back broken, fore part sank almost straightaway and stern half ten minutes later. Mined, laid by Meteor off Moray Firth [He - in 58.07N, 02.38W; wi - in 58N, 03W], "position stated to be 2 miles to the northward of the mine-field as then located"; Cdr Cole, 1 officer and 61 ratings lost [Rn/gf - 3 officers and 21 men survived; He/ke/wi - 70 lost including captain, 26 survivors], survivors picked up by SS Vocana later that morning [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ke/sc/wi; ADM.1/8429/230, ADM.137/3603]

LYRA, destroyer - see NYMPHE, destroyer, 16 October 1914, North Sea


M

M.15, monitor – see THESEUS, cruiser, 21 October 1915, Aegean Sea

M.16, monitor – see THESEUS, cruiser, 21 October 1915, Aegean Sea

M.19, monitor – see THESEUS, cruiser, 21 October 1915, Aegean Sea

M.28, monitor – see THESEUS, cruiser, 21 October 1915, Aegean Sea

M.29, monitor – see THESEUS, cruiser, 21 October 1915, Aegean Sea

MACEDONIA, armed merchant cruiser – see BATTLE OF THE FALKLANDS, 8 December 1914.

MAJESTIC [01], battleship – see REVENGE, battleship, 15 December 1914, Belgian Coast.

MAJESTIC [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

MAJESTIC [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

MAJESTIC [04], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 6 March 1915, Attack on the Narrows Forts

MAJESTIC [05], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

MAJESTIC [06], battleship - see E.15, submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

MAJESTIC [07], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

MAJESTIC [08], battleship, 27 May 1915. Gallipoli Campaign - Majestic-class, 16,060t, 1895, 4-12in/12-6in/16-12pdr/12-3pdr/5-18in tt, 17kts, c757 crew, Pendant No. D.04, Capt Henry Talbot, flagship of Rear-Adm Nicholson from 26th, providing gunfire support in Cape Helles area [J/He/ke - off W-beach], at anchor among unloading transports with torpedo nets out, as close inshore as possible, destroyers patrolling off shore. Periscope of U.21 [Otto Hersing] [J - U.23] spotted at 0645, 400 yds away on port beam, opened fire immediately but torpedo had already been fired, went right through the nets and hit amidships, second soon followed, ship capsized in 7min off Cape Helles [da - could be seen from V-beach; ke - W shore of Cape Helles; mf - W of Sedd-el-Bahr village; Cn - off Gaba Tepe near Anzac Cove]; 42 ratings and 2 canteen staff lost, killed by the explosion or entangled in nets [Rn/Cn/He/ke - 40 casualties; 737 survivors]. Sank in only 54ft of water, rested on foremast with fore-end of keel and bottom awash before disappearing under during the November storms. The withdrawal of bombarding battleships following the sinking of Goliath, Triumph and Majestic was a major victory for the Turks [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/da/dk/ke/mf/un; ADM.1/8422/144, ADM.116/1443]

MALTA [01], hired trawler – see C.33, submarine, 4 August 1915, North Sea

MALTA [02], hired trawler, 1 September 1915, North Sea - 138grt, built 1897, W Grant, Grimsby-reg GY325, hired 11/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Pendant No. 700, had operated with submarine C.33 as trawler-submarine decoy. Harwich-based, Skipper Frank McPherson RNR. Mined in field laid by UC.7 [Franz Wäger] the day before, sank 2 cables NW of North Shipwash Buoy, off Orford Ness [wi - in 52.01.18N, 01.37.35E]; 7 ratings lost [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/qs/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8432/259]

MANDATE, destroyer – see ARDENT, destroyer, 11 October 1915, North Sea

MANICA [01], balloon ship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

MANICA [02], kite balloon ship, 12 August 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - 4,120grt, built 1900, hired 12/5/15, supporting Suvla landings. [da - 14th] - Torpedo fired by UB.8 from 500yds passed under her shallow draught [da - submarine sighted outside net, two torpedoes fired and missed Manica, hit net at acute angle and burst]. Attack two days later on a similar vessels also unsuccessful [D/da/md]

MANX HERO, hired trawler, 10 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - 221grt, built 1910, W H Beeley, Grimsby-reg GY585, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.339, Skipper Edward Bray RNR, one of seven trawlers with 3rd Minesweeping Group accompanied by two picket boats, four escorting destroyers and supported by battleship Canopus and light cruiser Amethyst, taking part in attempt to sweep Kephez minefields in the dark. Instead of sweeping against the strong 3-4kt current, the intention was to get above the first line of mines and sweep down. Trawlers reached their position, passed sweeps in pairs and started back. Night of 10th/11th - Two mines exploded, one of them possibly so close to Manx Hero she sank, otherwise she hit a third, Turks opened fire, two trawlers hit and damaged by 6in shells, all then retired under destroyer cover; no lives lost in Manx Hero, crew picked up by HM Trawler Koorah [H/L/Lr/Rn/C/D/He/ap/dk/sc; ADM.137/1089]

MAORI [01], destroyer, 4 March 1915 - U.8 was detected by indicator nets in their first success, and then sunk by destroyers Ghurka and Maori in Strait of Dover.

MAORI [02], destroyer, 7 May 1915, Belgian Coast - F-class, 1,030t, 1909, 24in/218in tt, 33kts, 68 crew, Pendant No. H.16, 6th DF Dover Patrol, Lt-Cdr or Cdr Benjamin Barrow, with sister ship Crusader [Lt-Cdr Maxwell] reconnoitring Belgian coast, between Hayst and Blankenberge, to lay marks in preparation for shoot by battleship Venerable. Conditions misty and did not clear until mid-afternoon. Around 1515, steering SE at 18 knots. Mined at low water under her starboard quarter, spotted and hit by German shell-fire, sank 2 miles NW of Weilingen LV, near Zeebrugge [He - around 51.21.1N, 03.06.9E], crew got away in their boats, Crusader lowered a boat but her commander decided to retire because of the intense shore fire, and left the boat behind; no lives lost in Maori, 7 officers and 87 ratings reached shore to become POW's, Crusader's boat crew also taken prisoner [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dp/dq/ge/ke; ADM.156/145, ADM.1/8420/124]

MARGARET, Admiralty drifter, 115grt [ms – possibly 1886], purchased November 1914. Possibly sunk as blockship, no other details [C only]

MARIE DELLE VITTORIE, Admiralty blockship, 29 December 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - two Admiralty blockships were scuttled at "W" -Tekke Burnu beach, S tip of Gallipoli peninsula by 29th as breakwaters for final evacuation. Note: French old battleship Massena & French steamer Saghalien, 4,058grt, built 1881 were sunk as breakwaters at "V"- Sedd el Bahr or Cape Helles beach, in November [H/ms]: MARIE DELLE VITTORIE [ms – Maria …..], cargo steamship, ex-Clan liner Clan Graham, 2,926grt, built 1882, T Astarita [Rn/ms]; VINCENZO FLORIO, 2,752grt [ms – 2,840], built 1880 was Genoa, Italy-reg, I & V Florio & Co, Palermo/Servizi Marittimo [Lr/Rn/ms]

MARLBOROUGH, dreadnought – see DREADNOUGHT, dreadnought battleship, 18 March 1915, North Sea

MARSDEN, Admiralty hired iron paddle tug, 1 November 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - 131grt, 1906, Newcastle-reg, France, Fenwick Tyne & Wear, hired 24/6/15, serving off Gallipoli, SubLt Albert Trick. [C/D - 31 October] - Driven ashore by gale at Suvla Bay, W Gallipoli peninsula, stranded, later destroyed by Turkish gunfire. Owners received £6,500 compensation; no lives lost [H/C/D/He/dk/mc/tu]

MARY, hired trawler, 5 November 1914, North Sea - 256grt, built 1906, J Marr & Son, Fleetwood-reg FD84, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.361, Skipper William Stephen Greenaway RNR, sweeping Yarmouth field laid near Smith’s Knoll Buoy by German Kolberg with trawlers Columbia and Driver. [He – 3rd; all other sources, including casualties – 5th]. Mined just after 1000, after part destroyed, fore part settled and sank with two minutes [wi - in 52.35N, 01.54E]; Skipper and 7 ratings lost, 6 survivors rescued by Columbia and Driver [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/ap/dk/fd/wi; ADM.137/3110]

MASHONA, launch-tug – see OCEAN, battleship 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

MATCHLESS, destroyer, 13 November 1915, North Sea - M-class, c1,100t, Cdr George Gibbs, one of five Harwich Force destroyers, believed 10th Flotilla, finding their way back into Harwich after being out for two days and nights, trying to make for Orford Ness LH, dark winter evening. A Saturday in November, not necessarily the 13th - Matchless mined at 0551 in German field, stern complete with rudder and screws blown off, badly down by the stern and rolling heavily, taken in tow by sister-ship Murray [CO was the naval author Taffrail] by 0715, with great difficulty headed for Harwich. Just short of there, tow parted, taken in rest of way by light cruiser; no casualties. Patched up and taken to Chatham for new stern [Cn/dd/ty]

MAYFAIR, naval motor boat No.1, 19 April 1915, North Sea - hired 1914, Lt Edward Martin RNVR. Darkened and on patrol in Firth of Forth, W of Inchkeith in approaches to Rosyth, spotted at 2033 by also darkened and patrolling torpedo boat TB.32 which put engines full astern and helm hard a starboard, but hit Mayfair the starboard side, sinking her; no lives lost, all crew picked up by TB.32’s boat[s]. Mayfair continued to be listed until 1919, either a clerical error or she was possibly salvaged [He/D only; ADM.137/107, ADM.53/64641]

MELBOURNE [01] [RAN], light cruiser - see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 30 August 1914, German Pacific Possessions.

MELBOURNE [02] [RAN], light cruiser – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

MENTOR [01], destroyer – see UNDAUNTED, light cruiser, 24 April 1915, North Sea.

MENTOR [02], destroyer – see ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN, cargo ship, 4 July 1915, Atlantic off S Ireland

MENTOR [03], destroyer – see PRINCESS MARGARET, minelayer, 17 August 1915, North Sea

MERION, dummy capital ship No 14, battlecruiser “Tiger”, 30 May 1915, Aegean Sea - ex-transatlantic liner, 11,621grt, built 1902, International Navigation, Liverpool-reg, conversion ordered 21/10/14, hired 1/12/14, converted at Harland & Wolff, Belfast with wood & canvas superstructure and guns, heavily ballasted to approximate proportions of a battlecruiser, armed with 1-3pdr, ready early 1915, based in Aegean from February 1915, heading for Mudros. [un – 29th] - Torpedoed by UB.8 [Ernst von Voight], sank off Mudros, island of Lemnos [D/dx - off Strati Is, S of Lemnos]; 2 RNR officers and 2 MMR ratings killed. Note - C/D list her as purchased 30/5/15, the date of her loss; md - Lt von Voight reported attacking a large three funnelled ship at dusk, hit her with one torpedo abreast the forward funnel, but did not see her sink, nor did he identify her as a possible “battlecruiser”. Presumably torpedoed on the 29th, sank on the 30th [Lr/C/Cn/D/dk/dx/md/un/wd]

MERSEY [01], monitor – see ATTENTIVE, light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast

MERSEY [02], monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa - Mersey [Cdr R Wilson] and Severn, river monitors, Humber-class, 1,520t, 2-6in/2-4.7in/4-3pdr, 140 crew, after operations off Belgian coast, both ships were due for service in the Dardanelles in March 1915. Sailed 28 April from Malta with fleet messenger Trent, four tugs and a collier, reached Aden 15 May and Mafia Island 3 June, made good defects, fitted with extra protection and exercised with spotting aircraft. German light cruiser Königsberg moored down the Kikunja channel, northernmost tributary of Rufuji delta and 10 miles from the sea. Mersey and Severn entered the channel at 0520 on 6th, immediately came under 3pdr, pom-pom and machine gun fire from shore defences, both hit, but undamaged, whalers Echo, Fly, Childers swept and sounded ahead, light cruisers Weymouth and Pyramus followed in support. By 0630, 6 miles or 11,000yds from Königsberg, anchored, waited for spotting aircraft and opened fire, Königsberg also had spotting station nearby and replied with salvoes. Neither monitor hit for an hour until at 0740, shell struck Mersey's foremost 6in gun shield and put gun out of action, shortly holed near the waterline and pulled back 1,000yds. Severn continued for half an hour, then both ships waited until a second spotting aircraft arrived at 1330, returned to original position and fired until 1530, Königsberg hit around 6 times. Withdrew to prepare for next attempt five days later; Mersey’s casualties were 4 ratings killed, 2 DOW and 2 wounded [Rn/Cn/dk]

MERSEY [03], monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa - Mersey and Severn, river monitors, Humber-class, some damage and badly worn by shoot on the 6th, only now ready to resume attempt to destroy the Königsberg assisted by aircraft spotting. [dx - 15th] - Again fired on when entering the Rufuji River, both hit but little damage, starting at 1230 they took turns to fire although Königsberg fired back, at 1252 there was a large explosion, Königsberg was then apparently blown up and scuttled at 1346, firing continued until 1420 to complete her destruction, monitors recalled at 1430; two men slightly wounded on Mersey. Other ships taking part included light cruisers Chatham, Dartmouth, Challenger, Hyacinth, Pioneer [RAN], Pyramus, Weymouth, and armed merchant cruiser Laconia; Royal Navy Single Ship Action - Mersey and Severn v KÕNIGSBERG 1915 [Cn/Rn/dx]

MESSOUDIEH [01], stern-wheeler – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 24 July 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

MESSOUDIEH [02], stern-wheeler – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 22 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

MESSOUDIEH [03], stern-wheeler – see SHAITAN, armed launch, 28 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

MESSOUDIEH [04], stern-wheeler – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 1 December 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

METEOR, destroyer – see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915. M-class, 980t, 3-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, 1st DF Harwich Force, Captain D’s ship, Capt H Meade. Came up on the battered Blücher, manoeuvred to fire a torpedo and hit forward by heavy shell at 1120, exploded in foremost boiler room, almost putting her out of action; 3 stokers killed, 1 DOW and 2 crew wounded. Towed into Humber by destroyer Liberty. See also LION, TIGER [Rn/Cn/D/ty]

MICHIGAN, Admiralty blockship, December 1915, Aegean Sea – one of two Admiralty blockships, ex-passenger liners, both converted to dummy capital ships, ordered 21/10/14, purchased 28/10/14, converted at Harland & Wolff, Belfast with wood & canvas superstructure and guns, heavily ballasted to approximate the proportions of a battleship, ready by 4/12/14, based at Scapa Flow 1-10/15, transfered to Aegean as blockships 12/15:

MICHIGAN, 4,935grt, built 1887, Liverpool-reg, White Diamond SS, ex-dummy capital ship No.2 “Collingwood”. [C - 12/15] - Expended as blockship at Mudros, Lemnos island, salvaged after war [Lr/C/Cn/D];

ORUBA, 5,971grt, built 1889, Liverpool-reg, Royal Mail Steam Packet, ex-dummy capital ship No.6 “Orion”. [C - 1915] - Scuttled as "a much needed" breakwater in Kephalo Bay, Imbros island [Cn - Mudros] [Lr/C/Cn/D/da]

MIMI [01], gunboat, 23 December 1915, German East Africa Campaign - Gunboats Mimi and Toutou ready to start operations on Lake Tanganyika [dx]

MIMI [02], gunboat, 26 December 1915, German East Africa Campaign - Gunboats Mimi and Toutou captured German steamer Kingani on Lake Tanganyika [dx]

MINER [01], armed launch-tug – see OCEAN, battleship 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

MINER [02], armed launch-tug – see also ESPIEGLE sloop, 4 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

MINER [03], armed launch-tug, 4 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign - 50grt, built 1880, in service from 11/14, 1-12pdr/1-3pdr/1mg. Came under heavy fire from the shore off Kurnah, holed, returned downsteam and beached; no lives believed lost [Rn/D/dk]

MINER [04], armed launch-tug – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

MINERVA [01], light cruiser – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

MINERVA [02], light cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

MINOTAUR, cruiser, 12 August 1914, German Pacific Islands - Minotaur and light cruiser Newcastle bombarded German wireless installation on Yap island, western Caroline Islands

MIRANDA destroyer – see ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN, cargo ship, 4 July 1915, Atlantic off S Ireland

MIURA [01], hired trawler – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

MIURA [02], hired trawler, 23 August 1915, North Sea - 257grt, built 1911, Neale & West, Cardiff-reg CF36, hired 1914 [D - 2/15; He - 1915] as auxiliary patrol vessel, 1-3pdr or 6pdr, Admiralty No.979, Lt Leslie Kersey RNR. On patrol off Great Yarmouth, explosion on starboard quarter at 1245, heeled over, righted, then slowly settled by the stern, sank off Yarmouth, Norfolk [wi - in 52.36.16N, 01.54.20E]. Not known if she had been mined or torpedoed although survivors gave evidence that a U-boat was involved. Most sources list her as mined, Hepper as torpedoed. In either case, the submarine involved was UB.2 [Werner Fürbringer]; 11 ratings lost [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/ap/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3125]

ML.1 [01], motor launch, 9 April 1915, Auxiliary Patrol - British order for 50 American-built motor launches [ML.1-50] placed with Elco of Bayonne, NY through Canadian Vickers; further orders reached ML.580 [dx]

ML.1 [02], motor launch, 1 September 1915, S England - first 6 Elco-built ML's due to join the Auxiliary Patrol reached Portsmouth, were overhauled and carried out trials. ML's 1, 2, 3 commissioned at Portsmouth on 14 October [dx]

ML.2, motor launch - see ML.1, motor launch, 1 September 1915, S England

ML.3, motor launch - see ML.1, motor launch, 1 September 1915, S England

ML.52, motor launch, 29 November 1917, English Channel ML.51 series. Lieutenant William Forbes PrestonCobb RNVR. Based at Fort Blockhouse submarine depot to support submarine exercises, lying in Sandown Bay, Isle of Wight. Caught fire, burnt out completely and sank in the Bay; no lives lost (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/596)

ML.285, motor launch – see ML.289, motor launch, 29 December 1917, Caribbean Sea

ML.289, motor launch, 29 December 1917, Caribbean Sea - ML.50 series, at Trinidad, moored or lying alongside. Cotton waste caught fire in magazine, Deckhand Stanners went below and brought up the burning waste, probably saving ML.289 and the accompanying ML.285. Deckhand John Stanners from ML.289 awarded the Albert Medal in Gold (later George Cross) and Leading Deckhand Rupert Bugg RNR from ML.285 who went below to extinguish the remaining waste, the Albert Medal (ex-2nd-class). ML.289 presumably damaged but not destroyed (Cn/D/gc/lg)

ML.357, motor launch, 12 December 1917, English Channel - ML.50 series, Lt J Kitson RNVR, screening French Coal Trade Convoy. Came through fogbank about 1930 and saw U-boat submerging only 75yds off, guns would not bear so rammed at 18kts, going clean across from starboard to port, impact stopped engines but guns could now fire and U-boat driven off. ML badly damaged aft, making water fast and settling by stern, towed in by HMT Hercules IV, beached off Penzance in sinking condition; Lt Kitson awarded DSC (Mn/Cn/ap)

MOBILE, Admiralty collier, 28 April 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland - many supply ships especially colliers were needed for Admiral Jellicoe's Grand Fleet; some were lost as they passed up the western British Isles including Mobile, 1,950grt, built 1914, Furness, Withy & Co, West Hartlepool-reg, Mr W Fortune, Barry for Scapa Flow with coal. Captured by U.30 [Erich von Rosenberg-Grusczyski], sunk with bombs 25 miles NW of Butt of Lewis, Outer Hebrides [wi - by gunfire, in 58.48N, 06.50W] [H/L/Mn/Rn/te/un/wi]

MOHAWK [01], destroyer – see ATTENTIVE, light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast

MOHAWK [02], destroyer, 1 June 1915, Dover Straits - first U-boat mines laid off English coast by Flanders-based UC-boats, then more discovered off Harwich & Dover on 18th. First victim was Mohawk, F-class, 864t, 6th DF Dover Patrol, on patrol off North Foreland near NW end of net area. Saw mines close to her, could not get clear because of strong east-going tide, damaged in field laid by UC.11 [Walter Gottfried Schmidt] in south entrance to Downs, towed into Dover with upper deck almost level with the water; 5 ratings lost [Rn/Cn/dk/dp/ge/un]

MONARCH [01], dreadnought, 8 August 1914, North Sea - Orion-class, 2nd BS Grand Fleet, based at Scapa Flow, detached with Ajax and Orion for target practise S of Fair Isle. Attacked by U.15 late on the 8th, torpedoes missed, report of attack dismissed on grounds that U-boats could not operate so far from Germany. First submerged submarine attack of World War 1 [Cn/D/ge/gf/kt/nh]

MONARCH [02], dreadnought, 27 December 1914, North Sea - five ships of the Grand Fleet damaged in collision or by heavy weather: Monarch and Conqueror, dreadnoughts, Orion-class, 25,870t, 1911, 2nd BS, returning to Scapa Flow with the Fleet, entering narrow entrance of the Pentland Firth in the dark and a whole gale. Monarch stopped to avoid a patrol trawler, and Conqueror rammed her. Monarch's stern stove in, reached Scapa, left on 29th for repairs at Devonport, returned 20 February 1915; no lives lost. Conqueror fractured stempiece and badly damaged starboard forepart, extensive underwater injuries, brought into Scapa, special salvage plant sent up from Liverpool, patched up by around 18 January, arrived Invergordon 24th for further work, headed south for full repairs, not back in action for a considerable time; no lives lost. With the loss of Audacious, 2nd BS Grand Fleet was down from 8 to 5 ships [Rn/D/Cn/dk/gf/gr] Hope, Redpole, Ruby, destroyers, H-class, 970t, 2nd DF. All damaged by the gale force conditions, sent to dockyards for repairs; HMS Hope lost one man drowned [D/dk/gf/gr]

MONARCH [03], battleship – see STRATHGARRY, Admiralty trawler, 6 July 1915, Orkneys

MONITORIA, Admiralty collier, 21 October 1915, North Sea - 1,904grt, built 1909, Newcastle-reg, Ericsson Shipping, Mr G Marlow, Humber for London with coal. Mined, laid by UC.6 [Matthias Graf von Schmettow], sank 1 3/4m N by E 3/4 E of Sunk Head Buoy, off Harwich [L - 1 1/2m N by E 3/4 E of; wi - 1 3/4m N by E of, in 51.47.33N, 01.31.15E] [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

MONMOUTH, cruiser – see BATTLE OF CORONEL, 1 November 1914, South East Pacific. Monmouth or County-class, 9,800t, 1901, 146in/912pdr/2-18in tt, 23 kts, c678 crew, Pendant No. D.28, joined 5th CS West Africa station 8/14, then South America station, sent to Pernambuco to join flagship Good Hope, Capt Frank Brandt. Engaged by Gneisenau which stayed out of range of Monmouth's 6in guns, foremost 6in turret blown off and forecastle on fire, hit by between 30 and 40 shells, many amidships, after part on fire and tried to break away to the west, found by 2100 by light cruiser Nurnberg which had just reached the area of battle, Monmouth flooded, down by the bows and listing so far to port the port guns could not bear. Nurnberg stayed on that side and opened fire, then stopped to allow Monmouth to strike, she did not and the German re-opened fire, Monmouth capsized around 2120; 734 lives lost - 42 officers and 692 ratings, no survivors except 4 men previously landed on Albrohos Rocks as lookouts who escaped the action, the seas were too rough for Nurnberg to lower boats. See also GOOD HOPE, GLASGOW [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/dk/ke/nb/nh]

MONTROSE, Admiralty blockship, 20 December 1914, Dover Straits - One of two blockships purchased for scuttling in the gap between Admiralty Pier and Southern Breakwater at Dover. Ex-passenger-cargo liner, 7,207grt, built 1897, 443ft, [D - 4,452grt, 365ft], famous for carrying murderer Dr. Crippen and his mistress across the Atlantic in 1910 only for them to be arrested after the captain had sent a wireless message ahead, Canadian Pacific Railway, London-reg, purchased 28 October, fitted with large gantries for hanging anti-torpedo nets, filled with cement and ready for scuttling. [wi – 28 December 1916] - Broke loose from moorings within the harbour during a gale, drifted through the entrance and on towards Goodwin Sands, grounded near East Goodwin LV on South Sand Head [wi - in 51.14.56N, 01.34.12E], and broke in two. Wreck still lies in very shallow water. SS Spanish Prince was bought as replacement and scuttled in March 1915. See also LIVONIAN [Lr/C/D/dq/wi]

MORNING STAR, destroyer, 23 December 1915, North Sea - Morning Star, Repeat M-class, c1,250t, 11th DF and Porpoise, K-class, c1,300t, 4th DF, both Grand Fleet destroyers, escorting Russian ice-breaker north and forced to heave to near Fair Island Channel in heavy weather on 23rd, 1st CS sent out to search for them without success, returning to Scapa on 26th. Both destroyers damaged by heavy seas off Fair Isle, many compartments flooded and considerably damaged, Porpoise reached Cromarty on 25th, Morning Star on 26th [Cn/gf/gr]

MOSELEY [believed Mole], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

MOSQUITO [01], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

MOSQUITO [02], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

MOSQUITO [03], destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

MURRAY, destroyer – see MATCHLESS, destroyer, 13 November 1915, North Sea

MUZAFFRI/MOZAFFIR [01], stern wheeler – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

MUZAFFRI/MOZAFFIR [02], stern wheeler – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 24 July 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

MYRMIDON, destroyer, 23 October 1914, Belgian Coast - Myrmidon, B-class, with patrol flotillas and Wildfire, old composite sloop, Nymphe-class, two of the various unsuitable vessels operating as gunboats in support of the Alled armies. U-boat attack failed [Rn/D/dp]


N

NADINE, hired trawler, 1 September 1915, North Sea - 150grt, built 1898, Orient Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY138, hired 11/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Pendant No. 693, Harwich-based, tender to HMS Ganges, shore training establishment at Shotley, Suffollk, Skipper Percy Michael Saunders RNR. Mined in field laid by UC.7 [Franz Wäger] the day before, sank off North Shipwash Buoy, off Orford Ness [wi - 52.01.18N, 01.37.35E]; Skipper and 8 ratings lost [He – 3 survivors] [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8432/257]

NATAL, armoured cruiser, 30 December 1915, North Sea - Warrior-class, 13,550t, 1905, 69.2in/47.5in/24-3pdr/3-18in tt, 22kts, 712 crew, Pendant No. 69, 2nd CS Grand Fleet, Capt Eric Back, lying in Cromarty Firth at anchor S of Nigg Bay, E of Invergordon, advanced New Year’s party being held in wardroom with civilian guests including children. Online photographs of graveyard inscriptions confirm the 30th [H/C/gf/ke - 31st] - Fire started in stern around 1525 and quickly spread, stern magazine exploded, ship blew up at 1530 and sank very quickly [wi - in 57.41N, 04.05W], Court of Enquiry blamed faulty cordite charges; 418 lives lost - 25 officers, 378 ratings, 4 canteen staff, 3 QARNNS, 1 civilian fitter, 7 civilian guests [Cn/ke - 404 lives lost; dx - 404 crew, 7 women, 3 children; wi - 408 crew plus 13 civilians]. Wreck lay on her side with bilge keel just above water at low tide, sold for scrap in 1921. Difficult to break up, much of the hull is still on the seabed [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He*/cw/dk/dx/gf/ke/wi/www; ADM.178/123]

NEMESIS [01], destroyer - see NYMPHE, destroyer, 16 October 1914, North Sea

NEMESIS [02], destroyer, 17 March 1915, North Sea - Nemesis and Nymphe, destroyers, H-class, 970t, 2nd DF, taking part in Grand Fleet movements in northern and central North Sea since 16th, weather now too bad and Flotilla sent back to Scapa. Two ships collided, both needed docking for repairs [D/gf/gr]

NEMESIS [03], destroyer – see COMET, destroyer, 6 May 1915, North Sea

NEPTUNE, dreadnought – see DREADNOUGHT, dreadnought battleship, 18 March 1915, North Sea

NEW ZEALAND [01], battlecruiser - see BATTLE OF HELIGOLAND BIGHT, 28 August 1914,

NEW ZEALAND [02], battlecruiser - see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915.

NEWBRIDGE, Admiralty blockship, 10 November 1914, German East Africa - ex-collier, 3,737grt, built 1906, 342ft, Temperley SS Co, London-reg, purchased 1914, originally for use at Dover, sent to East Africa, filled with crushed rock and dynamite charges, 14 volunteer crew, Cdr Raymond Fitzmaurice. This was the first operation against the trapped German cruiser Koenigsberg. In the early morning, under fire but under cover of 6in cruiser gunfire, reached scuttling position 8 miles down the Ssuninga channel of the Rufuji river delta where it met the Ssimba-Uranga arm, swung across the river and anchored bow and stern, charges fired at 0550 and settled to the bottom. This still left two navigable channels - the northern Kikunja and the southern Kiomboni - by which Koenigsberg could reach the sea 10 miles away [L/Lr/Rn/D/dx/kp]

NEWCASTLE, light cruiser, 12 August 1914, German Pacific Islands - cruiser Minotaur and light cruiser Newcastle bombarded German wireless installation on Yap island, western Caroline Islands. [dx]

NEWLAND, hired trawler, 30 November 1915, Norwegian Sea - 245grt, built 1903, Hull-reg, hired 1/15, 10th CS, off Norway. Around 30th - badly damaged in a gale, boats smashed and leaking seriously, managed to reach Lerwick [D/bi]

NIGER, minesweeper, 11 November 1914, Dover Straits - ex-Alarm-class torpedo gunboat, 810t, 1892, 2-4.7in/4-3pdr/3-18in tt, 19kts, c90 crew, converted to minesweeper 1909, retained guns, fitted with kite winch & gallows on quarterdeck, now with Downs Boarding Flotilla, Dover Patrol, Lt-Cdr Arthur Muir. At anchor off Deal Pier as supervising vessel for local examination service, with two merchant steamers anchored nearby. Torpedo fired from direction of South Sand Head by U.12 [Walter Forstmann], track spotted at 600-800 yards on port beam, orders given to put port engine astern and helm over, but torpedo passed between the two steamers and hit amidships under the bridge at 1210. Ship settled by the head, slowly capsized to port and at 1230 sank bow first 1 1/2 m from Deal Pier [wi - in 51.13.12N, 01.26.29E]; 15 ratings lost [He – 1 man killed; ke/wi - all 8 officers and 77 ratings saved], survivors rescued by North Deal and Kingsdown lifeboats, 47 landed at Deal, remainder by tugs at Ramsgate [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/dk/dp/dq/ke/un/wi; ADM.137/3111]

NIGHT HAWK, hired trawler, 25 December 1914, North Sea - 287grt, built 1911, Pioneer Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY643, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.57, 13 crew, Sub-Lt or Lt William Senior RNR i/c, Skipper Evans, sweeping Scarborough field laid by cruiser Kolberg, between Flamborough Head and Whitby. On Christmas Eve put into Whitby for the night with her unit, came out on Christmas Day at 0700. “Whole bottom of the ship fell out with her engines and all hands that happened to be below”, disappeared in less than 10sec [He – a minute] off Scarborough [Mn - 5.5 miles E of; sc - off Whitby; wi - in 54.16N 00.15W]; six ratings lost in the explosion, 7 survivors including Lt Senior who rescued most of them from the freezing water using a liferaft which he sculled through the icy water [H/L/Lr/Rn/Mn/C/D/He/ap/dk/sc/wi; ADM.1/8407/488]

NITA PITA, naval motor boat, 2 December 1915, English Channel - ex-high speed pleasure motor boat, 12grt, with Motor Boat Reserve as HM MB No.149, armed with rifles, manned by RNVR crew, incorporated in Yacht Patrol organisation on 1/10/15, SubLt Charles Marten RNVR in command. Destroyed by fire at Poole, Dorset [wi - near Poole Harbour, around 50.42N 02W]; no lives lost [H/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/186]

NODZU, hired trawler – see SUSANNA, hired drifter, 14 December 1915, St George's Channel

NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915 - Old destroyers Recruit and Brazen were on patrol off the Galloper Lightvessel in the Thames Estuary, while Yarmouth trawlers Columbia, Barbados, Miura, Chirsit were searching for a reported U-boat off North Hinder. Recruit was torpedoed and sunk at 1120 by a UB-boat, and about the same time a torpedo was fired at Columbia off the mouth of the Scheldt, probably by another UB. The trawlers continued their search and by 1500 were back at North Hinder when they were attacked by small German TB's A.2 and A.6, a new type based at Zeebrugge and sent overland in sections for assembly at Antwerp. Four torpedoes were fired and Columbia sank, followed by a 20 minute gun action between the TB's and the three surviving trawlers. The Germans then headed back at the sight of Harwich destroyers Laforey, Leonadis, Lawford, Lark coming out in reponse to the loss of Recruit, chased and sank both by gunfire:

RECRUIT [1], destroyer, C-class, 425t, 1896, 1-12pdr/5-6pdr/2-18in tt, 30kts, c63 crew, Pendant No. N.60, Nore Defence Flotilla, Cdr Charles Wrightson. Torpedoed amidships at 1120 by UB.6 [Erich Haecker] [Cn/D - by UB.16], broke in two and sank quickly near Galloper LV [Rn - c30 miles SW of North Hinder LV; ge/un - 30 miles SW of the Galloper], reportedly the first warship sunk by a Flanders Flotilla submarine; 39 ratings lost [He – 34, ke - 43], four officers and 22 men saved by passing Dutch steamer [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/ap/dk/dx/ge/ke/un; ADM1/8420/114, ADM.1/8420/117];

COLUMBIA, Admiralty trawler, 266grt, built 1886, Hellyers Steam Fishing, Hull-reg H42, presented [presumably as a private gift] 9/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.200, Canadian Lt-Cdr Walter Hawthorn RNR. Torpedoed shortly after 1500, probably by first torpedo fired by A.6 off North Hinder LV [ap - 4 miles NW of; D - nearby Thornton Ridge; H/L/C - Foreness, near North Foreland, Kent]; total of 3 officers and 13 ratings lost, Barbados searched for survivors without success, later discovered one had been rescued by Miura. According to German reports, Lt Hawthorn and two men were picked up as POW’s, but lost when A.2 and A.6 were sunk [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/ap/dk/ge; ADM.1/8420/116];

BARBADOS, Admiralty trawler, [C - 211grt, built 1905; D - 183grt, built 1907], Hull-reg H.938, hired 10/14 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr AA, Lt Sir James Domville. Second torpedoes fired by A.2 and A.6 missed, then badly damaged by gunfire as Chirsit and Miura came up from some way off; Lt Domville and the skipper wounded. Note: The Colledge tonnage and build date apply to a second trawler named Barbados employed as BDV according to Dittmar & Colledge [C/D/ap]



NORTH WALES, Admiralty collier, 16 November 1914, South East Pacific, 3,691grt, built 1905, North Wales Shipping Co, Newcastle-reg, Mr George Owens, sailing Cardiff [kp - Tyne]/Juan Fernandez for Falkland Islands with coal. Captured by Dresden, sunk by bombs 360 miles SW 1/4 W true of Valparaiso [L/Mn - in 37.30S, 77W]; crew to tender Rhakotis, landed a month later at Callao [H/L/Lr/Mn/kp]

NORTHWARD, hired trawler – see POONAH, hired trawler, 18 August 1915, Orkneys

NOTTINGHAM [01], light cruiser – see BIRMINGHAM, light cruiser, 19 June 1915, North

NOTTINGHAM [02], light cruiser – see ROXBURGH, cruiser, 20 June 1915, North Sea

NUBIAN, destroyer – see ATTENTIVE, light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast

NUGGET, fleet messenger, 31 July 1915, Atlantic off SW England - One of two Admiralty fleet messengers sailing in company from Glasgow under sealed orders, bound for Dardanelles, heavy seas with SW force 8 gale blowing, sunk by U.28 [Georg-Günther Freiherr von Forstner] off the Scillies. Ex-coaster, 405grt, built 1889, Glasgow-reg, W Robertson, hired around 23/7/15, Pendant No. Y4.38, 15 crew, Lt Charles Amburger RNR. U.28 approached at speed and ordered crew to abandon ship in spite of conditions, when close enough Nugget went to full-speed and tried to ram, U-boat opened fire hitting the hull with 14 shells, sank at 2100, 45 miles SW of [wi - in 49.05N 06.58W]; no lives lost, all crew picked up by Dutch sailing vessel Annetta at 2200, transferred next morning at 0545 to patrol boat, landed at St. Mary's next day at 1030. See also TURQUOISE [H/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/1130]

NUMIDIAN, Admiralty blockship, 4,836grt, built 1891, 400ft, Allan Line SS Co, Glasgow-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.1 Barrier in Kirk Sound, between Lamb Holm island & Mainland [wi - in 58.53.42N, 02.53.53W]. Mostly salvaged in 1924, pile of scattered wreckage left [Lr/D/wi

NUSA [RAN], gunboat, 11 October 1914, German Pacific Possessions - Australian gunboat Nusa [ex-German yacht] captured German armed survey ship Komet near Talassia, north coast of New Britain island, retained by RAN as gunboat Una. [dx]

NYMPHE [01], destroyer, 16 October 1914, North Sea - Nymphe and Alarm, part of a division of four 2nd DF, H-class destroyers, Grand Fleet, with Lyra, Nymphe, Nemesis, Alarm steaming in line abreast on patrol off E entrance to Scapa Flow a few hours after the attack on Swift. U.9 attempted bow and stern shots around 1330, Nymphe sighted a periscope, gave the alarm and attempted to ram, torpedo missed her bow by feet, crossed ahead of Nemesis, and Alarm had to turn rapidly to port to avoid it. See also SWIFT, leader, 16 October 1914, North Sea [Rn/Cn/D/ge/gf/kt]

NYMPHE [02], destroyer – see NEMESIS, 17 March 1915, North Sea


O

OAKBY, Admiralty chartered collier, 23 February 1915, English Channel - one of two colliers sunk by U.8. 1,976grt, built 1897, Sir R Ropner & Co, West Hartlepool-reg, Mr F Bartlett, sailng London for Barry/Cardiff in ballast [would probably be carrying coal in that case; un – London for Barry Roads in ballast]. Torpedoed port side by U.8 [Alfred Stoss], forecastle was level with the water within 5min, 2nd engineer went below to stop engines to allow boats to be lowered, armed trawler Isle of Man came up and tried to tow her to Dover, but sank 4 miles E by N of Royal Sovereign LV [L - yorpedoed 2 miles E of Royal Sovereign LV, sank off Folkestone Pier; Mn - sank near Varne LV; wi - in 50.44N, 00.32E]. See also BRANKSOME CHINE [H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un/wi]

OCEAN [01], battleship, 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign - British/Indian forces started to land in Mesopotamia from the Persian Gulf supported by old battleship Ocean [Capt Hayes-Sadler], sloops Odin, Espiegle, and including Government yacht Lewis Pelly, launch-tugs Garmsir, Sirdar-I-Naphti, Mashona, Miner, all manned, armed and commissioned by HMS Ocean. Royal Navy Battle Honour - MESOPOTAMIA 1914-17 [dx]

OCEAN [02], battleship – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

OCEAN [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

OCEAN [04], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 4 March 1915, Beach Party landings around Kum Kale.

OCEAN [05], battleship – see AMETHYST, light cruiser, 14 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign.

OCEAN [06], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows. Canopus-class, 14,300t, 1898, 4-12in/12-6in/12-12pdr/4-18in tt, c750 crew, Pendant No. N.56, 8th BS Channel Fleet 8/14, later to Mediterranean, Capt Arthur Hayes-Sadler, with 2nd Division, now withdrawing under heavy fire from Dardanos and other forts. Mined around 1805 [J - shore torpedo from White Cliffs battery; C - by shore batteries], detonated starboard side adjacent to coal bunkers, nearby passages flooded and helmed jammed to port, at the same time, hit starboard-side aft by a shell, tiller-room and starboard steering engine-room flooded and repairs not possible, took 15° list. Abandon ship ordered and crew taken off. Ship abandoned, hopefully to drift out of danger if she stayed afloat, Jed lay off with Capt Hayes-Sadler on board until dark, finally left to her fate about 1930. The Turks reported she drifted into Morto Bay and sank there about 2230 [da - now partly salvaged, lays in 40.03N, 26.17E]; 1 rating lost [He/ke - all 683 crew saved], most of crew taken off by destroyers Colne, Jed and Chelmer under cross fire, four men accidently left on board rescued by Jed after dark. See also INFLEXIBLE, IRRESISTIBLE [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ke/mf; ADM.116/1443]

OCEANIC II, hired trawler, 5 June 1915, North Sea - U.14 sunk by Oceanic II in North Sea off Peterhead

OCEANIC, armed merchant cruiser, 8 September 1914, off Shetlands - ex-passenger ship, 17,274grt, built 1899, first vessel to exceed the length of Brunel’s Great Eastern, 21kts, White Star Line, Liverpool-reg, hired 9/8/14, c6-4.7in, joined 10th CS Northern Patrol 27/8, 400 crew, Capt William Slayter i/c, master, Cdr H Smith RNR, departed Lerwick in the Shetlands on 6th, now steaming in daylight but in dense fog. Ran aground on Hoevdi Grund rocks, 2.5 miles E by S of South Ness, Foula Island [wi - on the Shaalds, Hoevdi Rock, 2.4 miles E of Foula, in 60.07.03N, 01.58.18W], stranded, attempts made to refloat her, declared total loss three days later; no lives lost, crew taken off by fishing trawler Glenogil, then in civilian service, believed transferred to armed merchant cruiser HMS Alsatian, taken to Liverpool. Wreck bought for £200 and broken up on the spot through until 1924 [H/J/Lr/Mn/C/Cn/D/dk/ke/ss/wd/wi; ADM. 53/53135]

ODIN [01], sloop, 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign - Espiegle-class, 1,070t, 6-4in/4-3pdr, Capt Hayes-Sadler in command and crewed by Espiegle, with convoy carrying Anglo-Indian expeditionary force, entered Shatt-el-Arab and came under Turkish fire. Odin in 40-minute duel silenced a 4-gun battery at Fort Fao or Al Faw guarding the Shatt-el-Arab entrance, hit twice and later fired on by riflemen from trenches. Espiegle hit entrenchments further upstream opposite Abadan. See also OCEAN, battleship 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign [Rn/D/gb]

ODIN [02], sloop – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 21 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

ODIN [03], sloop – see ESPIEGLE sloop, 4 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

ODIN [04], sloop – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

ODIN [05], sloop – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 24 July 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

OKINO [01], hired trawler – see SWIFTSURE, battleship 5 March 1915, Turkish Coastal Operations

OKINO [02], hired trawler, 8 March 1915, Smyrna Blockade - 241grt, built 1914, H L Taylor, Grimsby-reg GY4, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.285, 15 crew, Lt Geoffrey Whitehouse RNR in command, sweeping channel into Smyrna [Izmir] at night to allow battleships to close and bombard the forts, battleships Triumph and Swiftsure firing on the searchlights. Night of 8th/9th - Mined and sunk about 3,000yds from Fort Yeni Kali, S side of Gulf of Smyrna [H/C/D/sc - in the Dardanelles]; 10 crew lost, skipper and four men saved [H/L/Lr/Rn/C/D/He/ap/dk/sc; ADM.1/8413/60, ADM.137/1089]

ORAMA, armed merchant cruiser – see KENT, cruiser, 14 March 1915, SE Pacific

ORCOMA, armed merchant cruiser – see ARLANZA, armed merchant cruiser, November 1915, Barents Sea

ORIANDA [01], hired trawler – see SKIPJACK, minesweeper, 19 December 1914, North Sea. 273grt, built 1914, Grimsby-reg GY291, hired 9/14, Admiralty No.99, Lt Hubert Boothby RNR. Went down within 10min with engines at full ahead, the tip of her masthead the last part to disappear [do - c1 mile SE of Scarborough Castle; wi – wreck lies in 54.15.17N, 00.18.32W]; 1 rating lost. Wreck stands upright and remains in one piece. See also PASSING, START OF BRITAIN [H/L/Rn/C/D/He/ap/dk/do/sc/wi]

ORIANDA [02], hired trawler – see BANYERS, hired trawler, 6 January 1915, North Sea

ORLANDO, hired trawler, 14 March 1915, off NW & W Scotland - 276grt, built 1907, Dolphin Steam Fishing, Grimsby-reg GY248, hired 8/14 as minesweeper [wi – armed patrol trawler], armed, Admiralty No.365, Skipper Frederick Mercer RNR. Ran ashore on Sgeir More [possibly Mhor] rock, Tarskavaig Point, southern Isle of Skye in bad weather and wrecked [H/D - near Stornaway, Hebrides; wi - in 58.12N, 06.22W]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/wi; ADM.137/100]

OROPESA [01], armed merchant cruiser – see VIRGINIAN, armed merchant cruiser, 17 April 1915, SW Scotland.

OROPESA [02], armed merchant cruiser – see PATIA, armed merchant cruiser, 11 September 1915, Atlantic W of Scotland

OROTOVA, armed merchant cruiser – see ARLANZA, armed merchant cruiser, November 1915, Barents Sea

ORUBA, Admiralty blockship – see MICHIGAN, Admiralty blockship, December 1915, Aegean Sea

ORVIETO, minelayer – see COMET, destroyer, 6 May 1915, North Sea

OSIRIS, despatch boat or depot ship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

OTHELLO II, Admiralty trawler, 31 October 1915, Dover Straits – one of two naval vessels mined in same field that day, 206grt, built 1907, Hull-reg H956 [He – Grimsby-reg], Hellyers Steam Fishing, hired 3/15 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Pendant No. 1193, Dover Patrol, Skipper Duncan MacLachlan RNR. Mined in field laid by UC.6 [Matthias Graf von Schmettow] the same day, broke in two, wheelhouse windows and door jammed shut, sank immediately off Leathercoat Point; Skipper and 8 ratings lost, only the deck-boy survived, trapped in the wheelhouse with the skipper, 2nd mate and helmsman, he was pushed through a half-open window. The boy went on to survive the sinking of HM Trawler Weigelia four months later on the Goodwins. Sliding wheelhouse doors in trawlers were replaced by light canvas ones. See also yacht ARIES [H/L/Lr/C/D/He*/dk/dq/hw/sc/wi; ADM.137/168; ADM137/3131]

OTRANTO, armed merchant cruiser – see BATTLE OF CORONEL, 1 November 1914, South East Pacific.


P

PARRAMATTA [01] [RAN], destroyer – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

PARRAMATTA [02] [RAN], destroyer – see AE.1, Australian submarine, 14 September 1914, South West Pacific

PARTHIAN, hired trawler, 15 November 1914, North Sea - Grimsby-reg, 202grt, built 1911, hired 8/14. In collision with and sank SS Vera, 2,391grt off Norfolk coast [wi - 4 miles E of Cley-next-the-Sea, in 52.58.15N 01.09.30E] [gr/wi]

PASSING, hired trawler – see SKIPJACK, minesweeper, 19 December 1914, North Sea. 459grt, built 1913, Grimsby-reg GY877, hired 8/14, 1-12pdr or 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.58, later 1542, Lt G Parsons. Badly holed [ap - first to be mined], down by the bows, badly on fire, steam-pipe severed and blowing off steam. Assisted by sweeping partner, then towed stern-first across Cayton Bay by paddle minesweeper Brighton Queen [SNO], beached on Scarborough Sands; no lives lost. Salvaged and put back into service. See also ORIANDA, START OF BRITAIN [C/D/ap/dk/do/sc]

PATHFINDER, light cruiser, 5 September 1914, North Sea - Pathfinder-class, 2,940t, 1904, 94in/2-14in tt, 25kts, c268 crew, leader, 8th DF [Forth Patrol Flotilla], Capt Francis Martin Leake, afternoon stormy with rough seas [He – returning to Rosyth from patrol in Firth of Forth; ke - on patrol off Firth of Forth; He/wi - because of small coal bunkers, steaming at 5 or 6kts instead of recommended 15kts where U-boats might operate]. Blown up off St. Abb's Head [He/wi – 14 miles ESE of May Island; dx - 10 miles SE of May island; wi - also in 56.07.18N, 02.09.20W], at first thought mined, but later confirmed torpedoed by U.21 [Otto Hersing] from 1,500 yards, hit starboard side under bridge, forward magazine exploded, bows blown off and sank in 4min; 9 officers, 250 ratings and 2 canteen staff lost, total of 261 [Cn/wi - 259 lives lost; He/ke – 256 with 12 survivors; wi - 9 survivors], wounded captain among the few saved. Wreck lies at 190ft. First warship sunk by a U-boat in WW1 [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ke/un/wi; ADM.116/1356]

PATIA, armed merchant cruiser, 11 September 1915, Atlantic W of Scotland - Patia, 6,103grt, built 1913, hired 21/11/14 and Oropesa, 5,364grt, built 1895, hired 22/11/14 [later French Champagne], armed merchant cruisers, 10th CS, on patrol W of Hebrides at night. In collision about 2200, both sent to Clyde for repairs, Oropesa damaged from waterline to upper deck at point of impact and leaking, Patia's stem badly damaged, escorted in by AMC Ebro and later a destroyer and trawlers, attacked by U-boat on passage [Mn/D/bi/gf/gr]

PATROL, light cruiser- see GERMAN RAID on HARTLEPOOL, SCARBOROUGH and WHITBY, 16 December 1914. Pathfinder-class, 2,940t, 9-4in/2014in tt, leader, 9th DF, Capt Alan Bruce. Worked her way out of the tidal harbour under fire, once clear, hit by two 8.2in shells from Blucher, then straddled by the battlecruisers 11in. Ran hard aground near South Gare breakwater, probably saved from destruction by the shore batteries, badly holed but reached the Tees safely; 4 ratings lost, 7 wounded. See also DOON [Rn/D/dk/gf]

PATUCA [01], armed merchant cruiser – see CLAN MACNAUGHTON, armed merchant cruiser, 3 February 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland

PATUCA [02], armed merchant cruiser, 1 July 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland - 6,103grt, built 1913, hired 21/11/14, 10th CS Northern Patrol, on line C to NW of Hebrides on lookout for the blockade-running Swedish SS Oscar II, sighted and stopped early morning. Oscar II hit Patuca crushing her own bows and then crashed alongside, hull-to-hull before Patuca's propeller holed the Swede's engine-room. Patuca's plates bulged and propeller flange bent, made seaworthy with collision mats, shoring and cement infill, made for Clyde as ordered at 14kts. Oscar II taken in tow by AMC Digby and ABS Royal Scot, assisted by destroyers Fury and Staunch, but sank after two days [D/bi/gf/gr]

PEGASUS, light cruiser, 20 September 1914, German East Africa - Pelorus-class, 2,135t, 1897, 84in/8-3pdr QF/2-18in tt, 20kts, c224 crew, Cape of Good Hope Station in August 1914, sent to East Africa, Capt John Alexander Ingles, during searches for Koenigsberg [10-4.1in], Pegasus had developed machinery defects and put into Zanzibar to repair them, also partly to protect the port. Although there was no indication Koenigsberg was in the vicinity, armed tug Helmuth patrolled the South Channel, Pegasus's men slept at their guns at night and steam was kept at two hours notice as she lay off the town. Helmuth saw a vessel approaching at 0525, steamed out to warn her off and received two blank rounds, Koenigsberg opened fire from 9,000yds and straddled the outranged Pegasus, within 8min all engaged guns were disabled but after a five minute pause the shelling continued. Koenigsberg ceased fire at 0555 and withdrew having done little damage to the town itself. Although badly holed on the water line, Pegasus was still afloat with engines untouched, attempts were made to beach her, but she turned over and sank in Zanzibar harbour around 1415; 1 officer and 31 ratings killed, 1 officer and 1 rating DOW the same day, followed by one rating each on 26th, 27th, 6/10, 8/10, a total of 38 [Rn - 2 officers DOW, 24 crew killed, five more DOW, 55 wounded; ke - 31 lost], survivors rescued by boats from collier Banffshire. Koenigsberg returned to the Rufuji River delta and was not discovered there until the end of October [H/J/C/Cn/D/dk/ke/kp; ADM.1/8394/326]

PELHAM, collier [wi - Admiralty collier transport No.604], 13 June 1915, Atlantic off SW England - 3,534grt, built 1906, Thompson SS Co, Sunderland-reg, 26 crew, Malta for Barry Roads in water ballast. U.35 [Waldemar Kophamel] appeared on the surface half a mile away, opened fire, ship turned away and went to full speed but hit repeatedly, engines stopped and ship abandoned. Germans placed bombs which sank her sometime after 1545, 30 miles NW of the Scillies [L - 30 miles N of; wi - in 50.16N, 06.55W;]; survivors picked up by drifter Our Allies, landed in Newlyn on 16th at 0145 [H/L/te/un/wi]

PHILOMEL [NZ], light cruiser - see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 30 August 1914, German Pacific Possessions.

PINA, believed Admiralty blockship – see FIERAMOSCA, Admiralty blockship, 18 December 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

PINCHER, destroyer – see GOLIATH, battleship, 13 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

PIONEER [RAN], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

PLOVER, tug – see AUDACIOUS, dreadnought, 27 October 1914, off N Ireland,

PONTOS, Admiralty blockship, 5,703grt, built 1900, 430ft [wi - 2,265grt, built 1891, 305ft], Andros, Greece-reg. Purchased 1914 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1914 in No.4 Barrier, in middle of Water Sound, between South Ronaldshay & Burray islands [wi - in 58.50.24N, 02.54.05W]. Wreck lies in centre of the Sound, partly visible [Lr/D/wi]

POONAH, hired trawler, 18 August 1915, Orkneys - 171grt, built 1903, Hull Steam Fishing & Ice, Hull-reg H737, hired 11/14 as minesweeper, 13pdr, Admiralty No.550. In collision with hired minesweeping trawler HMT Northward [204grt], foundered off Stromness, Orkneys [hw - in Suvla Bay]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw; ADM.137/146]

PORPOISE [01], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

PORPOISE [02], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CHALLENGER, light cruiser 27 September 1914, West African Campaign.

PORPOISE, destroyer – see MORNING STAR, destroyer, 23 December 1915, North Sea

PORTIA, Admiralty fleet messenger, 2 August 1915, Atlantic off SW England - ex-coaster, 494grt, built 1906, Liverpool-reg, South Wales & Liverpool SS, hired c23/7/15, Pendant No. Y4.36, Lt-Cdr Langton Bromwell [Rtd]. Captured by U.28 [Georg-Günther Freiherr von Forstner], sunk by gunfire 70 miles S of Scillies [He – SW of]; no lives lost. The third fleet messenger sunk in three days by U.28. See also NUGGET and TURQUOISE [H/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/cs/dk/un; ADM.137/1131]

PRINCE CHARLES, Q-ship, 24 July 1915, Atlantic off N Scotland - U.36 sunk by Prince Charles, first success by submarine decoy ship working alone. Prince Charles was not believed damaged in the action [dx]

PRINCE EUGENE, monitor – see SANDA, hired yacht, 25 September 1915, Belgian Coast

PRINCE GEORGE [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

PRINCE GEORGE [02], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

PRINCE GEORGE [03], battleship – see ALBION, battleship, 2 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

PRINCESS BEATRICE, hired trawler, 5 October 1914, North Sea - 214grt, built 1912, North Shields-reg SN202, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, unarmed, Admiralty No.287, Skipper Alexander Hall RNR, serving with Dover Patrol. Mined, sank off Belgian coast; Skipper and 10 ratings lost. [Hepper – one of two Admiralty minesweeping trawlers sweeping in company near the North Hinder lightship, off the Belgian coast, disappeared with all hands, believed mined and sunk. Neither vessel was seen to sink, but other ships in the area reported an explosion at 1930, followed 15 minutes by another, perhaps when the surviving sweeper went to the assistance of the first.] [H/L/C/D/He/dk/dq; ADM.137/3109, ADM.1/8396/355]

PRINCESS IRENE, minelayer, 27 May 1915, SE England - 6,000grt, built 1914, one of two new ferries/liners built for Canadian Pacific Railway, converted by Denny, now 5,934grt, 2-4.7in/2-12pdr/2-6pdr AA/500 mines, 23kts, commissioned 20/1/15, Pendant No. P.47, [Commanding officer: Rn - Cdr T H M Maurice; He - Capt Mervyn Cobbe; ke - Capt M Cole], started to lay minefield NW of Heligoland on 8th/9th with sister ship Princess Margaret, now in River Medway, either alongside or mooored off Sheerness, undergoing repairs and mines, some reportedly with defective pistols, being primed. Major explosion amidships at 1108, followed by more as mines detonated, ship destroyed; at least 358 lives lost - 30 officers, 210 crew, 5 ratings from Chatham base HMS Pembroke, 36 merchant seamen and more than 77 civilians in the dockyard including at least 70 dockyard workers - 21 skilled labourers, 44 shipwrights and 5 yard boys [He – 51 crew, 78 dockyard workers and 6 men in Steam Pinnace 263 lying alongside; ke - 51 crew plus 77 civilian workers killed, 2 crew plus 1 civilian survived] [H/J/Rn/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ke; ADM.116/1445, ADM.1/8422/147]

PRINCESS LOUISE, hired trawler, 20 July 1915, off Fair Isle - U.23 sunk by combination decoy trawler Princess Louise/submarine C.27 [dx]

PRINCESS MARGARET [01], minelayer – see PRINCESS IRENE, minelayer, 27 May 1915, SE England

PRINCESS MARGARET [02], minelayer, 17 August 1915, North Sea - Princess Margaret, auxiliary minelayer, 5,934grt, built 1914, and Mentor, destroyer, M-class, 1,055t, 3-4in/2-1pdr/4-12in tt, 10th DF, Cdr E Inman. Princess Margaret escorted by two divisions of 10th DF, supported by Harwich LCS and four 4th DF destroyers, sailed to lay field off Amrun Bank, 25 miles N of Heligoland, heading S from Horns Reef LV, very dark night, sea calm, heavily overcast. Ran into division of German 2nd TBF, attacked with torpedoes, Princess Margaret missed but Mentor's bows blown away under water, steamed back to Harwich; no casualties listed. Operation called off [Rn/Cn/D/ty]

PRINCESS ROYAL, battlecruiser - see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915.

PRINCESS VICTORIA, hired trawler, 7 November 1915, Atlantic off NW France - 272grt, built 1903, Hull-reg H.766, Armitage's Stream Trawling, hired 9/15 as patrol vessel, 13pdr, Admiralty No.1971, Skipper Ernest Wales RNR. Escorting collier Cressington Court and motor lighter X.65 in company with Admiralty trawler Donalda from Devonport across the English Channel. In collision with the collier at 1900 near Ushant, NW France and sank, no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw; ADM.137/169]

PROSERPINE, light cruiser – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

PSYCHE [NZ], light cruiser - see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 30 August 1914, German Pacific Possessions.

PYRAMUS [01], light cruiser - see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 30 August 1914, German Pacific Possessions.

PYRAMUS [02], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa

PYRAMUS [03], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa


Q

QUAIL III, hired trawler, 22 June 1915, English Channel - [He – Quail II], 162grt, built 1897, Kelsall Brothers & Beeching, Hull-reg H236, hired 1915 [D - 11/14; He - 1914] as minesweeper, 2-3pdr, Pendant No. 645. [Other sources – 23 June, perhaps because her loss was close to midnight on the 22nd] - In collision with tug Bulldog, sank at 2340, 7 miles SW of Portland Bill, Dorset [wi - in 50.30N, 02.30W], no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/fd/hw/wi; ADM.137/126]

QUEEN ELIZABETH [01], dreadnought – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

QUEEN ELIZABETH [02], dreadnought – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

QUEEN ELIZABETH [03], dreadnought, 5 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - Queen Elizabeth-class, 31,500t, completed January 1915, 8-15in/16-6in, taking leading part in first bombardment of the inner defences, anchored in the Aegean 2 1/2m W of Gaba Tepe and firing over the Gallipoli peninsula at the Narrows forts, spotting by seaplanes and battleship Albion within the Straits. Turks brought up mobile field guns and howitzers, mainly 12pdrs and hit her 17 times, no serious damage [Rn/Cn/D/da]

QUEEN ELIZABETH [04], dreadnought – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 6 March 1915, Attack on the Narrows Forts

QUEEN ELIZABETH [05], dreadnought – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

QUEEN ELIZABETH [06], dreadnought - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

QUEEN, battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings


R

RACOON [01], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

RACOON [02] , destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

RACOON [03], destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

RACOON [04], destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

RECRUIT, destroyer – see NORTH SEA ACTION, 1 May 1915

REDPOLE, destroyer – see MONARCH, dreadnought, 27 December 1914, North Sea.

REGINALD, Admiralty blockship, 930grt, built 1878, 240ft, The Admiralty, Glasgow-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.3 Barrier, East Weddel Sound, between Burray & Glims Holm islands [wi - in 58.52.17N, 02.54.48W]. Some of the wreck remains [Lr/D/wi]

REINDEER, screw minesweeper – see IMMINGHAM, store carrier, 6 June 1915, Aegean Sea

REINFELD, Admiralty blockship, 3,582grt, built 1893, 340ft, was Continentale Rhederei AG, Hamburg-reg. Purchased 1914 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1914 in No.2 Barrier, Skerry Sound, between Glims Holm & Lamb Holm islands, in centre of channel [wi - in 58.52.57N, 02.53.56W]. Wreck much broken up, close to SS Elton, now part of Churchill Barrier [Lr/D/wi]

RELIANCE, store carrier – see also AENNE RICKMERS, seaplane carrier.

REMUS [01], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

REMUS [02], gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CHALLENGER, light cruiser 27 September 1914, West African Campaign.

RESONO, hired trawler, 26 December 1915, North Sea - one of two naval vessels mined on same day in field laid by UC.5 [Herbert Putkuchen] ten days earlier. Resono, 230grt, built 1910, Grimsby-reg GY508, George F Sleight, hired 1/15 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.1042, commanded by a Lt RNR, “one of God’s own seamen”, Skipper Peter Burgon RNR. Sank near Sunk LV, off Harwich [wi - in 51.50.54N, 01.38.09E]; Skipper and 12 ratings lost, survivors included the captain. See also E.6 [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/wi; ADM.1/8443/365]

RESOURCE II, hired yacht, 12 November 1915, English Channel - ex-steam yacht, 734grt, built 1865, hired 1/10/15 as depot ship for the new RNVR-commanded ML’s arriving from the US, Pendant No. 098, Lt-Cdr Francis Richardson RNVR in command. Fitting out in Southampton, possibly at anchor, caught fire, towed clear of the dock to stop the fire spreading to shore installations, gutted and sank in Southampton Water [wi - in 50.48N, 01.17W]; no lives lost [H/J/C/D/He/ap/dk/se/wi; ADM.137/170]

RESPONSO, hired trawler, 31 December 1915, Orkneys - 228grt, built 1912, Grimsby-reg GY666, George F Sleight, hired 1914 as auxiliary patrol vessel, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.196, Lt Horace Harvey RNR [wi - J McKenzie, Captain]. Driven ashore at Rive, N of Sanday Island, Orkneys in westerly storm, abandoned as total wreck [wi - in 59.17N, 02.35W]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/207]

RESTORE, Admiralty drifter, 12 October 1915, Adriatic Sea - 93grt, built 1914, Lowestoft-reg LT215, hired 8/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.1826, armed with five rifles, with the first 60 hired drifters that reached Taranto by 31/9/15 to lay nets across Otranto Straits, Skipper George Catchpole RNR in command. Tending her nets, three other drifters 3 miles away. In first attack on Otranto drifters, U.39 [Walter Forstmann] started shelling from 4 miles at 0800, Restore blew her whistle, sent up rockets and headed NE for Saseno island, hit in engine-room and disabled, crew abandoned ship in the one boat, U-boat closed from 2 miles to just a few yards, shelled and sank her within 3min off the Albanian coast, then attacked the other three drifters before heading north for Cattaro; 2 ratings lost [H/L/Mn/C/D/He/ap/dk/ge/un; ADM.137/3133]

RESTORMEL, Admiralty collier, 19 August 1915, Atlantic off SW England - [wi - Admiralty-requisitioned collier, released for this one voyage and cargo], 2,118grt, built 1901, New Restormel SS Co, Cardiff-reg, 19 crew, Seville for Clyde with 3,300t iron ore. U.38 [Max Valentiner] surfaced close by, fired two shells and ordered her to stop, crew tried to abandon ship but master headed away at full-speed. Firing continued and ship finally hove-to, crew abandoned ship and a torpedo was fired hitting her in No.2 hold. Restormel was still afloat after the sinking of the nearby Baron Erskine, the U-boat returned, fired four shells into the engine-room and she sank at 0900, 28 miles NNW of Bishop Rock, Scillies [wi - in 50.15N, 06.52W]; armed yacht Rovenska arrived, forced the submarine to withdraw, the survivors were then rescued and landed at Penzance. One of three colliers sunk by U.38 at this time – see also BARON ERSKINE, SAMARA [H/L/te/un/wi]

REVENGE, later renamed Redoubtable, old battleship, 15 December 1914, Belgian Coast -Royal Sovereign-class, 15,580t, 4-12in/10-6in/7-18in tt, on sale list 8/14, now bombarding ship, Dover Patrol, with battleship Majestic and two or three gunboats, bombarding gun positions on Belgian coast around Zeebrugge. Revenge badly hit probably by 8in shell. Returned next day without Majestic because of the risks, again hit by 8in shell, badly damaged below the waterline, had to retire for docking. No lives lost [Rn/D/dq]

RHIANNON, Admiralty yacht, 20 July 1915, North Sea - 126grt, built 1914, hired 15/9/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel, 2-3pdr, Pendant No. 055, Lt-Cdr George Wellburn RNR. On patrol in Thames Estuary between Longsand and Kentish Knock sands with Admiralty trawler Strathspey, approaching wreck of Norwegian steamer Peik mined and sunk on 5 July. Detonated mine which destroyed the forepart of the vessel, leaving after part afloat before it too sank, off Longsands, off Clacton [wi - in 51.40N, 01.29E]. The mine had not been left over from the field that sank Peik and which had been swept; it had been laid by UC.3 [Erwin Weisbach]; Cdr Wellburn, 1 officer, 1 rating and 2 MMR killed by explosion [H/J/L/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8427/194, ADM.1/8427/206]

RHODESIA, Admiralty trawler, 19 April 1915, off NW Scotland - 155grt, built 1899, Hull Steam Fishing & Ice, Hull-reg H443, hired 1/15 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.1215, Skipper Philip Marr RNR [wi - A Gibson, Captain]. Wrecked near Stornaway, Isle of Lewis [He/wi - on Obb Rock, S of Tulm Is, South Harris, in 57.41.20N, 06.20.40W]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/wi]

RIBBLE, destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

RIFLEMAN [01], destroyer, 23 August 1914, probably North Sea - H-class, 970t, 2nd DF Grand Fleet. In collision in fog with sister-ship Comet, which was "considerably damaged"; no lives lost [D/df/dk/gr]

RIFLEMAN [02], destroyer, 22 May 1915, North Sea - H-class, 2nd DF Grand Fleet, with other destroyers carrying out contraband control duties E and SE of Pentland Firth because of a U-boat threat to the usual armed boarding steamers. Grounded in fog, needed docking for repairs [Cn/D/gf/gr]

RINALDO, old sloop – see VENERABLE, battleship, 28 October 1914, Belgian Coast

RIVER CLYDE, assault ship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

RIVIERA [01], seaplane carrier – see ENGADINE, seaplane carrier, 25 October 1914, North Sea.

RIVIERA [02], seaplane carrier – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

ROEDEAN, auxiliary screw minesweeper, 13 January 1915, Orkneys - ex-Roebuck, railway packet, 1,094grt, built 1897, Great Western Railway Co, Milford Haven -reg, hired 2/10/14, armed with 1 or 2-12pdr, Pendant No. M.35, renamed Roedean 12/14, Cdr Stephen Pidgeon RNR. Sank at entrance to Longhope Sound, SE Hoy island [wi - in 58.48.36N, 03.09.48W], cause originally not recorded; no lives lost. “Wreck Index” notes that one source describes her as mined, but with Hepper, goes on to confirm that she actually dragged her anchor in bad weather, collided with the bow of harbour repair hulk Fisgard, ex-Imperieuse, was holed, and foundered as she passed down the starboard side of Fisgard. Cdr Pidgeon was reprimanded for only having one anchor out [H/J/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.1/8409/20]

ROHILLA, Admiralty hospital ship, 30 October 1914, North Sea - ex-passenger liner, 7,891grt, built 1906, British India Steam Navigation Co, Glasgow-reg, hired 6/8/14, total of 229 on board including 100 medical staff, a Catholic priest and an injured naval gunner from Scapa Flow, Mr Neilson in command, sailed Leith Docks 29th for Dunkirk to pick up wounded troops from Western Front, severe SE gale with heavy seas. Possibly struck the Whitby Rock [wi - also possibly mined, although this appears unlikely at this stage in the war], at 0410 driven on to the The Scar rocks 600yd offshore, S of Whitby [wi - in 54.29.21N, 00.35.42W], broke her back; Whitby, Redcar and Upgang lifeboats launched in appalling conditions and saved some of those onboard, Tynemouth lifeboat Henry Vernon rescued over 50 after pouring oil on the water. Ninety lives lost - 62 crew and 28 naval medical staff, but 138 were rescued [wd - 86 lost, 143 saved including the Master and all nurses]. Wreck remains lay in depths of 20-50ft. Sister hospital ship Rewa was torpedoed in 1918 [H/Lr/D/dk/wd/wi]

ROLULU, Admiralty trawler, 27 May 1915, off NW Scotland - 170grt, built 1909, George F Sleight, Grimsby-reg GY399, hired 4/15 as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.1468, Skipper James Hodson RNR. Hebrides area, ran aground on Obb Rock, S of Tulm Is, South Harris in bad weather and wrecked, listed heavily to port but stern remained above water long enough for crew to be taken off; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/117]

RONDA, Admiralty blockship, 1,941grt, built 1889, 274ft, T Wilson & Sons, Hull-reg, held in reserve. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in deep-water channel in about 40-60ft in Burra Sound, between Hoy & Graemsay islands [wi - in 58.55.40N, 03.18.38W]. Wreck dispersed in 1962 to clear shipping channel [Lr/D/ms/wi/www]

RONDO, hired trawler, 3 March 1915, Shetlands - 117grt, built 1893, George F Sleight, Grimsby-reg GY528, hired 1915 [D - 11/14] as auxiliary patrol vessel, Admiralty No.666, [wi - F Harlow, Captain up to 1914]. [He – 2nd] - Stranded on Unicorn Rocks, Tingwall, Shetland Islands at 2015 [wi - position unknown, but quotes 60.20N, 01.15W], bow held by rocks, flooded rapidly and sank by the stern, a wreck; crew stood by for an hour before leaving her in the boat, no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/98]

ROSEWOOD, Admiralty blockship, 1,757grt, built 1889, 259ft, Constantine & Pickering SS Co, South Shields-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1915 in No.2 Barrier, Skerry Sound, between Glims Holm & Lamb Holm islands [wi - in 58.53.11N, 02.54.19W]. Wreck now almost completely dispersed [Lr/D/wi]

ROTHERFIELD, Admiralty blockship, 2,831grt, built 1889, 320ft, Woodfield SS Co, London-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Scapa Flow, scuttled in about 40-60ft in Burra Sound, between Hoy & Graemsay islands [wi - in 58.55.40N, 03.18.38W]. Dispersed by explosives 1962 to clear shipping channel. Note: WW2 blockships in this channel include Inverlane, Tabarka, Doyle [Lr/D/wi]

ROVENSKA, hired yacht – see BARON ERSKINE and RESTORMEL, both Admiralty colliers, 19 August 1915, Atlantic off SW England

ROXBURGH, cruiser, 20 June 1915, North Sea - Argyll and Roxburgh, armoured cruisers, Devonshire-class, 10,850t, 4-7.5in/6-6in, 3rd CS, Nottingham, light cruiser, Birmingham-class, 2nd LCS, all Grand Fleet, as the 3rd CS sweep continued, more torpedo attacks took place: Roxburgh, Argyll and Nottingham all missed by U.17, Nottingham missed for a second time by U.6. Before the latter attack, Roxburgh [Capt C Foot], zigzagging at high speed was hit well forward in the bows by U.38 [Max Valentiner] [Cn - U.39] at 1400 in 56.47N, 00.38E, maintained speed at 14kts returning to Rosyth, met by destroyers of 1st DF and escorted in. Considerably damaged, repairs were not completed until April 1916 [Rn/Cn/D/ge/gf/un]

ROYAL ARTHUR, cruiser, 9 September 1914, North Sea - Edgar-class, 7,700t, 10th CS Grand Fleet on Northern Patrol. Off Peterhead, approaching Swedish SS Tua [345grt], rammed and sank her with two men drowned, survivors taken into Cromarty. Damage not known [Cn/D/bi/gr/ms]  

ROYAL SCOT, armed boarding steamer – see PATUCA, armed merchant cruiser, 1 July 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland

RUBY, hired trawler, 24 November 1915, Central Mediterranean - 198grt, built 1899, Grimsby-reg GY1136, T C & F Moss, hired 7/15 [He – as minesweeper], 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1742, Skipper George Barrett RNR. Wrecked in Grandes Bay, S of Cape Sidero, Crete; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk]

RUBY, destroyer - see MONARCH, dreadnought, 27 December 1914, North Sea.

RUSSELL, battleship, 23 November 1914, Belgian Coast Operations - Old Duncan-class battleships Russell and Exmouth, 6th BS bombarded Zeebrugge, but inflicted little damage [dx]


S

SAMARA, Admiralty collier, 19 August 1915, Atlantic off SW England - [wi - Admiralty requisitioned collier No.563], 3,172grt, built 1906, MacLay & McIntyre, Glasgow-reg, sailing Colombo via Port Said for Bristol with sugar. Shelled by U.38 [Max Valentiner], ship abandoned, sank 35 miles W of Bishop Rock [L - 30 miles W of; wi - 35 miles NW of, in 49.45N, 07.20W]; survivors picked up by HMT Dewsland, landed at Penzance that day at 1730. One of three colliers sunk by U.38 at this time – see also BARON ERSKINE, RESTORMEL [H/L/te/un/wi]

SANDA [01], hired yacht – see GREAT HEART hired drifter, 24 September 1915, Belgian Coast

SANDA [02], hired yacht, 25 September 1915, Belgian Coast - ex-St Serf, 300grt, built 1906, hired 26/1/15 as auxiliary patrol vessel, 2-6pdr, Pendant No. 073, Dover Patrol, Lt-Cdr Henry Gartside-Tipping RN Rtd, aged over 70 in August 1914, volunteered for war service, “the oldest naval officer serving at sea”. Sailed in company with monitor bombardment force including Prince Eugene and General Crauford evening of 24th for Zeebrugge shoot, to start on 25th at 0700 in support of attack by British Army. Sanda was screening net drifters, shore batteries started replying at 0900. Hit near the deckhouse and sunk, probably by 8in shell from German batteries at Blankenberghe around 0915; 4 officers including the captain, 5 ratings and 4 MN lost [Rn - 12 officers and men lost; ap - 4 officers, 11 men killed or missing], survivors rescued by hired drifter Fearless [H/J/Rn/C/D/he/ap/dk/dp/dq; ADM.1/8437/315]

SAPPHIRE, light cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

SARNIA [01], armed boarding steamer, 11 April 1915, English Channel - 1,498grt, built 1910, hired 14/11/14, 2-12pdr, Cdr H Muir RNR. At 0700 Brixham smack Addax reported seeing a U-boat chasing a steamer half an hour earlier, at 0730 Sarnia sighted the French SS Frederic Franck 3 1/2m off with crew in boats and U.24 [Rudolf Schneider] alongside. Sarnia approached, the U-boat submerged, and Sarnia circled the steamer firing at the periscope. Around 0820 a first torpedo was evaded, then a second. Having called for destroyer help, she continued circling, firing at and attempting to ram the periscope until 1020 when the U-boat made off; the French steamer was only damaged [Mn/D]

SARNIA [02], armed boarding steamer – see HYTHE, screw minesweeper 28 October 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

SATRAP, Admiralty collier, 31 December 1915, N or W British Waters - Two loaded Admiralty chartered colliers heading for northern Britain went missing, “not since heard from”, lost on passage on or after 31st:

SATRAP, 2,234grt, built 1913, Newport-reg, Trident Line, 22 crew, Mr J Charlmers, sailed Barry 31st under sealed orders for “Naval Base in the north, within 5 days steam of Cardiff”, posted by Lloyds 9/2/16. “Wreck Index” refers to a memorial plaque in Manorbier Church, near Caldey Is, Pembrokeshire. Satrap was presumably lost off this coast - in approximately 51.38.15N, 04.48.45W as bodies were washed ashore and buried in the churchyard [H/L/Lr/wi];

TYNEMOUTH, 2,222grt, built 1909, Newcastle-reg, Burnett SS, sailed Cardiff 21st for North Scotland, posted by Lloyds 9/2/16 [H/L/Lr]

SAXON, hired trawler – see INDIA, armed merchant cruiser, 8 August 1915, Norwegian Sea

SCHIEHALLION, hired trawler, 9 June 1915, Mediterranean - 198grt, built 1903, Aberdeen-reg A905, Grampian Steam Fishing, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.352, Skipper Thomas Barlow RNR. Mined and sunk, no other details; no lives lost [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk]

SCORPION [01], destroyer - see E.15, submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

SCORPION [02], desteoyer, 27 April 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - Scorpion and Wolverine, destroyers, G-class, c,1,100t, 1-4in/3-12pdr/2-18in tt, 5th DF Mediterranean Fleet, two of nine temporarily-equipped minesweeping destroyers, sweeping some way inside the Straits to allow the battleships to reach bombardment positions, sweep wires passed and drawing apart. Turkish 4.1in shore batteries opened fire, Wolverine hit on bridge, Scorpion by shell in seaman’s messdeck which started a fire, soon put out; Wolverine lost Cdr O Prentis her captain, a sub-lieutenant RNR and coxswain [dk – on the 28th, probably night of 27th/28th]. There were a few shrapnel holes in Scorpion [Lt-Cdr A B Cunningham - “ABC” of WW2 fame] soon repaired by destroyer depot ship Blenheim. Over the succeeding days, more destroyers were hit and damaged [Cn/D/cu/dd/dk]

SCORPION [03], destroyer – see GOLIATH, battleship, 13 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

SCOTT, Admiralty trawler, 22 October 1915, North Sea - 288grt, built 1913, Hull-reg H.968, Pickering & Haldane's Steam Trawling, hired 4/15, minelayer, 1-6pdr/24 mines, Admiralty No.3218, then N.2A, Lt Arthur Notley RNR. [un – 21st] - Mined, laid by UC.1 [Egon von Werner] two days before, sank 2 miles ESE of Tongue LV, N of North Foreland [wi - in 51.32N, 01.25E]; 3 ratings lost [H/L/Lr/D/C/He/dk/hw/wi; ADM.1/8437/314]

SCOURGE [01], destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

SCOURGE [02], destroyer, 7 August 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - G-class, c1,100t, one of ten destroyers taking part in Suvla landings, each one carried in 500 troops on deck with another 500 in a towed X or motor lighter, Scourge landed her men on C-beach, S of Nibrunesi Point. Now trying to get some of the lighters off the ground, hit in engine-room by Turkish shell around 0830 and had to retire for repairs; casualties uncertain, but one rating lost [Rn/Cn/dd/dk] X-lighters, ramped self-propelled landing craft, X.1-series, designed for Dardanelles, launched 4-7/15, 160t, could carry 500 troops, carried K numbers, also known as K-boats, motor lighters, nicknamed "beetles". At least 10 lighters, numbered K.1-10 took part in the Suvla landings, some of which may not have got off, others damaged by gunfire [Rn/Cn/da/ec]

SCOURGE [03], destroyer, 19 November 1915, Gallipoli Campaign – in service off the Dardanelles, boiler explosion. Six stokers killed [dk]

SEA RANGER, hired trawler – see CAMEO, Admiralty trawler, July 1915, North Sea

SEVERN [01], monitor – see HUMBER, monitor, 13 October 1914, Dover.

SEVERN [02], monitor – see ATTENTIVE, light cruiser, 18 October 1914, Belgian Coast

SEVERN [03], monitors – see MERSEY, monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa

SEVERN [04], monitor – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

SHAITAN [01], armed launch – see ESPIEGLE sloop, 4 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHAITAN [02], armed launch, Monday 7 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign - 1-3pdr, taken up 11/14, Lt-Cdr Elkes RNR, continuing operations to take Kurnah. Disabled by heavy fire; commander killed and 1 rating DOW, both on HMS Ocean's books [Rn/D/dk]

SHAITAN [03], armed launch, 9 December 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign - British-Indian forces captured Kurnah/Al Qurnah, surrender taken by Capt Hayes-Sadler. Ships taking part over the four or five days hit by shell and rifle-fire, Royal Navy casualties included the two killed on Shaitan and ten wounded [Rn/gb]

SHAITAN [04], armed launch – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHAITAN [05], armed launch – see COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 27 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHAITAN [06], armed launch – see COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 28 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHAITAN [07], armed launch – see COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 30 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHAITAN [08], armed launch – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 22 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHAITAN [09], armed launch, 28 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - taken over 1/12/14, 1-3pdr, later 1-12pdr, Lt Aubrey Thursfield, with River Flotilla vessels Firefly, Comet, Messoudieh, Shushan, Sumana covering withdrawal from Ctesiphon to Kut. [D/dx - 29th] - Both Comet and Shaitan went aground just above Aziziya, Comet was soon off, but Shaitan remained unmoveable. Comet, Firefly, Shushan spent all day under constant snipper fire trying to get Shaitan free but were forced to abandon her with the approach of the Turkish advance guard; no lives lost. After two days rest the retreat continued to Umm-at-Tubal [H/Rn/D/He/dk/dx/gb/tf; ADM.137/3089]

SHARK, destroyer - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914

SHUSHAN [01], stern wheeler – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHUSHAN [02], stern-wheeler – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 24 July 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHUSHAN [03], stern-wheeler – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 22 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHUSHAN [04], stern-wheeler – see SHAITAN, armed launch, 28 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SHUSHAN [05], stern-wheeler – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 1 December 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SILVERY WAVE, hired drifter, 13 November 1915, Atlantic off SW England - 96grt, built 1915, Lowestoft-reg LT507, hired 9/15 as net drifter, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.1900, from St Mary’s, Scilly Islands for patrol & return, entering Crow Sound in bad weather in company with drifter Boy Eddie to take shelter on the night of the 12th/13th. Wrecked on NE side of St. Mary's island, near Pelistry Bay, Scillies [he - driven into Water Mill Cove and went ashore; wi - in 49.55.30N, 06.16.30W]; no lives lost. Badly damaged and declared a loss [H/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/170];

BOY EDDIE, hired drifter, 59grt, built 1909, hired 3/15 as net drifter. Went ashore at same time as Silvery Wave, refloated [D/he/wi]

SILVIA, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 23 August 1915, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 5,268grt, built 1913, Oil Tank SS Co, Liverpool-reg, 41 crew, Mr J Prouse, Halifax [NS] for Queenstown with 6,600t fumace fuel oil. U.38 [Max Valentiner] sighted two miles away on starboard beam at 1100, started shelling, tanker stopped and abandoned, U-boat closed, boarded and placed charges in engine room, pulled off a short distance and opened fire after they had exploded. Silvia sank at 1215, 47 miles W of Fastnet Rock, off Co Cork [L/wi - 40 miles W of, in 51.07N, 10.46W], ship's confidential papers thrown overboard by Master in weighted bag; survivors picked up by armed trawler at 1900, landed at Berehaven. One of two vessels sunk by U.38 at this time – see also TRAFLAGAR [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

SINKING OF CRUISERS ABOUKIR, HOGUE, CRESSY BY U.9, North Sea, 22 September 1914. [I] Southern Force [Adm Christian] had the task of keeping waters south of Dogger Bank clear of German torpedo craft and minelayers, also to protect troop movements across the English Channel. Patrols were carried out by Harwich Force [Cdre Tyrwhitt] with light cruiser leaders and 1st and 3rd DF's in cooperation with submarines of 8th Overseas Flotilla, and supported by cruiser Euryalus [flag], attached light cruiser Amethyst, and 7th CS or Cruiser Force C with cruisers Bacchante [flag, Adm Campbell], Cressy, Aboukir, Hogue, based on the Nore. One patrol area was off the Dogger Bank and one in the Broad Fourteens off the Dutch coast, weather was so bad on 17th that both destroyer flotillas had to be ordered home, leaving only the Dogger Bank being watched by Euryalus, Hogue and Aboukir, with Cressy back home coaling and Bacchante in dock for repairs.

[II] The Admiralty was already aware the cruisers were not suitable for this work and plans were in hand to reassign the "Live Bait Squadron" to less risky duties. On the 19th, only the patrol in the Broad Fourteens was to be maintained, but the weather was still too bad for destroyers to come out. On the 20th, Adm Christian had to leave in Euryalus to coal and for repairs to his wireless, and was unable to transfer his flag to Aboukir because of heavy seas. Command therefore passed to Aboukir’s Capt Drummond, who was joined by the re-coaled Cressy. Still no destroyers could join them then or thoughout the 21st, but then Fearless [Cdre Tyrwhitt] and eight destroyers were able to leave Harwich. Early on the 22nd, Admiralty received message "Aboukir and Hogue sinking" and more ships were sent out.

[III] Cruiser Force C, the three large or 1st class cruisers [Cressy-class, 12,000t, 2-9.2in/12-6in/14-12pdr/2-18in tt, 21kts, c700 crew] was steaming abreast and unescorted in a northeasterly direction i.e. towards German bases at the time, two miles apart, at 10kts and not zig-zagging, although on the lookout for submarines and each with two guns loaded and crews closed up. Aboukir was torpedoed at 0630, Hogue started rescue operations but was then torpedoed herself, followed by Cressy, all sunk by U.9 [Lt-Cdr Otto Weddigen] in 52.18N, 03.41E, about 30 miles W by S of Ymuiden [dx - off Maas LV]; over 1,460 men were lost including many old reservists and young midshipmen, more than the British losses at the Battle of Trafalgar, 60 officers and 777 men were saved in total by Dutch steamships Flora [170], Titan [147], Lowestoft sailing trawlers Coriander and J.G.C. [280] and ships of Harwich Force which arrived at 1045. See also ABOUKIR, HOGUE, CRESSY [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ge/ke/ty; ADM.137/47, ADM.137/2232, ADM137/2081, ADM.1/8396/356]



SIRDAR-I-NAPHTI, launch-tug – see OCEAN, battleship 6 November 1914, Mesopotamian Campaign

SKIPJACK, minesweeper, ex-gunboat, 19 December 1914, North Sea - three days after the Yorkshire Raid, minesweeping gunboats Skipjack, Gossamer, Jason, on passage from Sheerness to Scapa Flow to rejoin Grand Fleet, were ordered to sweep from Flamborough Head north to Scarborough to determine the extent of the minefield laid by the German Kolberg, but only found two mines off Scarborough. Grimsby-based Admiralty-hired minesweeping trawlers were then sweeping closer inshore, and a number of mines were swept up or detonated in sweeps. As Skipjack joined them, Orianda was mined and sunk close by, and two more damaged, all off Scarborough. Skipjack and the rest of the sweepers anchored until the tide rose. See also ORIANDA, PASSING, START OF BRITAIN [H/L/Rn/C/D/He/ap/dk/do/sc/wi]

SPANISH PRINCE, Admiralty blockship, March 1915, Dover Straits - 6,505grt, built 1894, 450ft, Prince Line, Newcastle-reg, purchased as replacement for Dover blockship Montrose lost 20 December 1914, fitted out in same way; March - Scuttled on east side of southern entrance across from Livonian [ms – 6,394grt, owned by J Knott, scuttled off Dover Breakwater, November 1914] [Lr/D/dq/ms]

SPARROWHAWK, destroyer, 18 February 1915, Orkneys - K-class, c1,300t, 4th DF Grand Fleet. Probably sometime in February after Goldfinch was lost - Went ashore, got off, but "considerably damaged". See also GOLDFINCH [Cn/D/gr/gf]

SPEEDY, minesweeper, 3 September 1914, North Sea - one of two small warships lost in Humber minefield laid by German Nautilus, near Outer Dowsing LV. Ex-Alarm-class torpedo gunboat, 810t, 1893, 1 or 2-4.7in/4-3pdr/3-18in tt, 19kts, c90 crew, converted to minesweeper 1909, retained guns, fitted with kite winch & gallows on quarterdeck, Lieutenant Commander Edward Miller Rutherfoord. Rescuing Lindsell's survivors, but mined herself. Whole of after part blown off including rudder and propellers, flooded and sank an hour later, 30 miles off the Humber [dx - 12 miles NNE of Outer Dowsing LV; wi - in 53.34N, 00.10E]; 1 rating lost. See also LINDSELL [H/J/C/Cn/D/ap/dk/dx/ke/wi; ADM.137/3108]

SPEETON, hired trawler, 31 December 1915, North Sea - 205grt, built 1913, Hull Steam Fishing & Ice, Hull-reg H104, hired 10/15, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1908, Skipper George Norvell RNR. Ordered to patrol off Lowestoft, explosion heard at 1915 by a number of vessels which went to investigate, body of a crew member found between Corton Lightvessel and South Scroby Sands, believed to have detonated a mine, laid that day by UC.7 [Georg Haag], sank 4 3/4m E by S of Corton, N of Lowestoft [un – in 52.33N, 01.50E; wi - in 52.30.54N, 01.52.43E]; 2 officers and 9 ratings lost, all hands [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/un/wi; ADM.137/3126]

SPENNYMOOR, Admiralty collier, 28 May 1915, English Channel - 2,733grt, built 1915, Moor Line, Newcastle-reg, sailing Sunderland for Cardiff with pit timber, on maiden voyage. [L - 27th] - captured by U.41 [Claus Hansen] and sunk by torpedo 50 miles SW 1/4 W of Start Point [L - 50 miles SW by W of]; 5 lives lost including master [H/L/te/un]

SPIDER, Admiralty trawler, 21 November 1914, North Sea - ex-Assyrian, 271grt, built c1908, originally Hull-reg H914, purchased by Admiralty 4/09, one of six vessels which, prewar, trained crews of the fishery reserve in minesweeping, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No. possibly 54, commissioned as minesweeper, originally based at Portsmouth, now with Auxiliary Patrol, Chief Gunner Albert Frankland in command. [He – 22nd] - Wrecked/stranded at Lowestoft, Suffolk; no lives lost [hw - later re-floated]. Note: in one of two accounts, “Wreck Index” describes her as damaged by U-boat-laid mine [but this was too early in the war], beached on Newcombe Sand, then towed towards Lowestoft but sank opposite the Hamilton Dock, in 52.28.15N, 01.45.26E “where she lay for many years”. In Hepper’s account “she was heading inshore at 2am [presumably on the 22nd] in a strong easterly gale with very heavy seas, and was driven onto the beach near the war Signal Station, at the northern end of the breakwater, Lowestoft, the crew being taken off by lifeboat. She was abandoned as a wreck. Remains sold in April 1915 although the hull apparently remained largely intact. This was to cause much concern later, with sand building up around the wreck to form a hazard to shipping.” [H/C/D/He/dk/hw/wi; ADM.137/76]

SPITFIRE, destroyer - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914

STAG, destroyer, 25 September 1914, North Sea - D-class, probably Forth-based 8th Patrol Flotilla. Two torpedoes fired at her off Isle of May, Firth of Forth, torpedo also fired at another destroyer [Mn/D/gf]

STAR OF BRITAIN, hired trawler – see SKIPJACK, minesweeper, 19 December 1914, North Sea. 228grt, built 1908, hired 9/14, Aberdeen-reg, Lt C Crossley RNR. Leaking badly from mines exploding close alongside, in danger of sinking but saved; no lives lost. See also ORIANDA, PASSING [D/ap/dk/sc]

STAR OF BUCHAN, hired drifter, 20 October 1915, English Channel - 81grt, built 1913, Fraserburgh-reg FR534, hired 1/15 as patrol boat, Admiralty No.787. Recovering indicator nets when a mine was probably snagged and exploded at 0630, laid by UC.5 [Herbert Pustkuchen] the day before, blown up and foundered about 500 yards S of Nab Light [wi - SE of, in 50.35N, 00.53W]; 7 ratings lost [H/L/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.1/8436/310, ADM.137/543]

STAUNCH, destroyer – see PATUCA, armed merchant cruiser, 1 July 1915, Atlantic off NW Scotland

STRATHCARRON, Admiralty collier, 8 June 1915, St George's Channel area - 4,347grt, built 1912, Strathcarron SS Co, Glasgow-reg, sailing Barry for Truro with coal. Torpedoed and sunk by U.35 [Waldemar Kophamel] off The Smalls, 60 miles W of Lundy Is, off Devon [L - in 51.05N, 06.10W] [H/L/Lr/te/un]

STRATHGARRY, Admiralty trawler, 6 July 1915, Orkneys - 202grt, built 1906, Aberdeen Steam Trawling & Fishing, Aberdeen-reg A97, hired 6/15 [D/He - as boom defence vessel; wi - armed patrol trawler], Admiralty No.5, based at Scapa Flow, Skipper Isaac McFarlane RNR. Ships of 2nd Battle Squadron returning to Scapa Flow anchorage at 0330, passing through boom, battleship Monarch collided with and sank her [wi - in 58.45N, 03.05W]; no lives lost [He – one man drowned] [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/129]

STRATHSPEY, hired trawler – see RHIANNON, Admiralty yacht, 20 July 1915, North Sea

SUCCESS, destroyer, 27 December 1914, North Sea - B-class, 425t, 1901, 112pdr/56pdr/218in tt, 30kts, 63 crew, Pendant No. D.24, possibly serving with Forth-based 8th Patrol Flotilla, Lt William Pennefather, sailed from Aberdeen on the 26th after coaling and heading for Rosyth, port shaft appeared damaged and run at slower speed than starboard one, weather bad with fog. No account taken of the defective shaft, the strength of the wind, and approaching the coast at night. Ran aground off Fife Ness [wi - on Cambo Sands, Kingsbarns, just NW of Fife Ness, in 56.18N, 02.37.36W] around 0500, still on the 27th. Progressively flooded, including engine room and most compartments by 31st, and abandoned; no lives lost, crew believed taken off on the 27th by two local lifeboats, Not refloated, later heavily salvaged, only keel remains buried in the sand [H/J/C/Cn/D/dk/ke/wi; ADM.156/14]

SUMANA [01], armed launch-tug – see CLIO, sloop, 3 June 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [02], armed launch-tug, 5 July 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - 2-3pdr, Lt W Harris, supporting advance along River Euphrates towards Nasiriya. Turkish shell cut main steam pipe during the day, out of action, back next day [Rn/D]

SUMANA [03], armed launch-tug – see ESPIEGLE, sloop, 24 July 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [04], armed launch-tug – see COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 27 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [05], armed launch-tug – see COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 28 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [06], armed launch-tug – see COMET, armed paddle launch-tug, 30 September 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [07], armed launch-tug – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 22 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [08], armed launch-tug – see SHAITAN, armed launch, 28 November 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [09], armed launch-tug – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 1 December 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

SUMANA [10], armed launch-tug, 7 December 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign - British/Indian forces reached Kut on the 3rd, by the 7th they were completely surrounded by the Turks, armed launch Sumana stayed with the garrison when the rest of the River Flotilla withdrew [dx]

SUSANNA, hired drifter, 14 December 1915, St George's Channel - 83grt, built 1907, Banff-reg BF637, hired 8/15 [D/He - as net drifter; wi - armed patrol drifter], Admiralty No.2704, Skipper George Cowie RNR, entering Milford Haven in a gale, started to leak and pumps unable to keep her afloat. Foundered around 1430 off Saint Ann's Head [He – 1 1/2 miles S of Skokholm island; wi - in 51.40.45N, 05.10.15W], one of three Milford-based patrol drifters lost in 1915 winter storms; no lives lost. Hepper reports that much of her hull was found adrift some days later by trawler Nodzu, and taken into Milford for inspection, where it was found she was poorly built and in bad condition [H/C/D/He/dk/ps/wi; ADM.137/188; ADM.137/591]

SWIFT [01], flotilla leader – see HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea

SWIFT [02], flotilla leader, 16 October 1914, North Sea - 4th DF Grand Fleet, dispatched from Scapa Flow with division of destroyers on 15th to search for missing Hawke. Reported U-boat near position where Hawke was last heard from, but no ship, searched all night and at 0900 spotted a raft with an officer and 20 men, reportedly attacked a number of times, and only by manoeuvring at high speed and screened by the other destroyers was it possible to rescue them. Search continued until the following morning when Swift returned to Scapa Flow. See also HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea [Cn/D/bi/ge/gf/ss]

SWIFT [03], flotilla leader, 17 October 1914, off Orkneys - Grand Fleet. Reported another U-boat attack off Scapa Flow [Mn/ge]

SWIFTSURE [01], battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal - Turkish attack on Suez Canal repulsed with the support of British and French warships, battleships Swiftsure, Ocean, old light cruisers, Minerva, Proserpine, sloop Clio, armed merchant cruiser Himalaya, torpedo boat No.043, Royal Indian Marine armed troopships Dufferin, Hardinge took part; Royal Navy Battle Honour - SUEZ CANAL 1915, to 4th [dx]

SWIFTSURE [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 2 March 1915, Third Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

SWIFTSURE [03], battleship 5 March 1915, Turkish Coastal Operations - Attempt to reduce Smyrna [Izmir] forts by bombardment was unsuccessful because of defensive minefields; battleships Swiftsure, Triumph, armoured cruiser Euryalus, seaplane carrier Aenne Rickmers, five trawler minesweepers took part. Minesweeper No. 285 [Okino] sunk on 8th, Aenne Rickmers damaged on 11th [dx]

SWIFTSURE [04], battleship – see TRIUMPH, battleship, 6 March 1915, Smyrna Blockade

SWIFTSURE [05], battleship – see OKINO, Admiralty trawler, 8 March 1915, Smyrna Blockade

SWIFTSURE [06], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

SWIFTSURE [07], battleship – see TRIUMPH, battleship, 25 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

SWIFTSURE [08], battleship, 12 August 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - Swiftsure-class, 11,800t, 4-10in/14-7.5in and Grafton, ex-1st-class protected cruiser, Edgar-class, 7,350t, 2-9.2in/10-6in, now bulged or "blister ship", providing gunfire support off Suvla beaches. Swiftsure hit by 12-pdr field gun, 5 ratings lost and 10 wounded, one of whom died, Grafton off C-beach, S of Nibrunesi Point lost 9 ratings killed and 10 wounded [Cn/da/dk]

SWIFTSURE, battleship, 18 September 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - Swiftsure-class, 11,890t, proceeding Mudros for Suvla. Believed attacked by U-boat - possibly U.21, but not recorded in German Official History [Rn/Cn/D/ge]

SYDNEY [01] [RAN], light cruiser – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

SYDNEY [02] [RAN], light cruiser, 9 November 1914, Indian Ocean, Sinking of Emden - German light cruiser SMS Emden headed for the Cocos Islands to destroy the cable and wireless station on the smaller Direction Island, appeared at 0550 and a warning was immediately sent out by cable station superintendent. Emden anchored and sent armed party ashore which destroyed the installations over the next two and half hours. Around 0630, the warning signal had been intercepted by light cruiser HMAS Melbourne escorting an Australian troop convoy only 50 miles away to the north, sister-ship Sydney was detached to investigate. Arriving off Cocos at 0915, Sydney sighted Emden which opened accurate fire at 0940 from 9,500yds, Sydney's after control station was soon hit. Making the most of her longer-range guns, Sydney brought down Emden's foremost funnel, foremast, then second funnel and third, the badly damaged Emden headed for the northerly North Keeling Island and ran aground at 1120. Sydney left to pursue the escaping collier SS Buresk, captured some time before. Schooner Ayesha was seized by German landing party after Emden left them ashore to go and fight Sydney, sailed to Padang, Dutch East Indies, and on to Turkish-occupied Yemen. The Germans then travelled overland to Constantinople. SYDNEY, Chatham-class, 6,000t, 8-6in/4-3pdr/2-21in tt, Capt John Glossop, Australian Fleet. Slightly damaged; 3 ratings killed, 1 DOW and 12 wounded. Royal Navy Single Ship Action - Sydney v EMDEN 1914 [Rn/Cn/D/dk/kp]

SYREN, destroyer – see FALCON, destroyer, 28 October 1914, Belgian Coast


T

T. R. FERENS, hired trawler, 13 July 1915, Barents Sea - 307grt, built 1913, Hull-reg, hired 5/15 as minesweeper, one of six trawlers fitted out at Lowestoft to sweep German mines laid in June in White Sea on the route to Archangel, departed 22 June, arrived Alexandrovsk, Murman coast on 6 July, started sweeping successfully. Mined, damaged off one of the headlands [D/sc]

TALBOT, cruiser - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

TARA [1], armed boarding steamer – see BAYANO, armed merchant cruiser, 11 March 1915, North Channel

TARA [02], armed boarding steamer, 5 November 1915, Eastern Mediterranean - ex-Hibernia, 1,862grt, built 1900, Dublin-reg, London & North Western Railway, hired 8/8/14, 3-6pdr, 105 crew, Capt Rupert Gwatkin-William i/c, master, Lt Tanner RNR. During Senussi revolt in Cyrenaica against the Italians, submarine sighted off Sollum on Egyptian border, four armed Egyptian customs cruisers on patrol off Egyptian coast now joined by Tara as senior ship in Western section east from Sollum, steaming into Sollum. Torpedoed by U.35 [Waldemar Kophamel], sank immediately in Sollum Bay [te - off Bardia]; 10 lives lost during the attack, 95 survivors towed in their lifeboats by U.35 to Bardia, handed over first to the Turks, and then local Senussi tribesmen. Senussi were defeated that same month and Bardia re-occupied 3/16 when it was learnt that Tara’s crew were prisoners in a camp 120 miles W of Bir Hakim/Hacheim. Vehicles of the Duke of Westminster’s Armoured Car Squadron and motor ambulances crossed the unmapped desert in 14 hours to rescue the survivors, four of whom had died in captivity; total of 14 lives lost - 3 officers, 1 rating, 8 merchant seaman killed, and 1 officer and 1 MN DOW. At the time of the attack on Tara, U.35 sank the Egyptian Abbas [plus also damaged: ap/dx - Nur el Bahr; ge - Abdul Moneim] off Sollum [H/J/L/Lr/Rn/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/dx/ge/ke/te; ADM.116/1529, ADM.137/4020]

TARANAKI, hired trawler – see C.24, submarine, 23 June 1915, North Sea

TARANTULA, river gunboat – see FIREFLY, river gunboat, 1 December 1915, Mesopotamian Campaign

TARLAIR, hired drifter, 4 February 1915, U-boat Warfare - Tarlair equipped with first anti-submarine hydrophone [dx]

TARTAR, destroyer – see LEVEN, destroyer, 8 September 1915, Dover Straits

TB.043, torpedo boat – see SWIFTSURE, battleship, 3 February 1915, Suez Canal.

TB.046, torpedo boat, 21 December 1915, Aegean Sea  - Thornycroft 125ft-type, 60t, 1886, 20kts, 2-3pdr/4-14 in tt, 16 crew, one of five TB's [Cn - 042, 044, 046, 063, 070; D - 043, 044, 063, 064, 070] formed Malta Local Defence Flotilla, Gunner Robert Stocker in command.  Departed Malta 18 December for Mudros in tow of mercantile auxiliary Carrigan Head, weather bad. On 19th taking in water, and later worsened, decision taken early on the 21st to take off crew which was accomplished by 0700. Torpedo boat cast adrift and sunk by gunfire in 35.42N, 22.37W. Wreck raised in 1920 and scrapped. [Earlier sources and research - possible confusion with TB.064: sailing Port Said for Mudros, ran out of coal, taken in tow. Wrecked by heavy weather on Lemnos island on 27th, later salved, apparently refloated, repaired and put back into service, sold for breaking up 1920 [J - foundered in tow]]; no lives lost [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk; ADM.137/3607]

TB.063, torpedo boat – see T.B. 064, torpedo boat, 21 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

TB.064, torpedo boat, 21 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign - Yarrow 125ft-type, c87t, 1886, 19kts, 2-3pdr/5-14in tt, 16 crew, Chief Gunner James Cottrell in command. One of a group of six torpedo boats, including TB’s 063 and 070, sailed on 17th from Port Said for Mudros on the island of Lemnos, in company with old light cruiser Doris and collier Kasala. On the 20th, off the island of Khio [or Chios] with the weather worsening, they coaled, but TB.064 only took on half her bunkers. Continuing on to Lemnos in strong NE gales and following a course change, 064 became separated, and Doris, after reaching Mudros with the other five TB's, went out to search for the missing one. She was found off the east coast of the island, at anchor, with hardly any remaining coal and in no condition to proceed. Night of 21st - anchors dragged, drifted ashore and wrecked E side of Lemnos island; no lives lost, crew saved after a stoker swam ashore with a line [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ke; ADM.137/3119]

TB.070, torpedo boat – see T.B. 064, torpedo boat, 21 March 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

TB.10, torpedo boat – see TB.12, torpedo boat, 10 June 1915, North Sea

TB.12, torpedo boat, 10 June 1915, North Sea – one of two torpedo boats, ex-Cricket-class coastal destroyers, c400t, 1907, 26kts, 2-12pdr/3-18in tt, 35 crew, serving with Nore Local Defence Flotilla. Sailed from Harwich at midnight on the 9th, on patrol off Thames estuary, searching for reported submarines with three other TB’s and five destroyers; both mined, laid by UC.11 [Walter Gottfried Schmidt] two days earlier [H/J/tn - torpedoed]:

TB.12, ex-Moth, Lt Edward Bulteel, near the Sunk LV at 1530 when there was a large explosion under her bows, believed torpedoed at the time [He/un – confirmed mined]. Stayed afloat as other TB's came to her rescue, crew abandoned her when TB.10 came alongside, taken in tow, but now TB.10 suffered an explosion and sank. Trawler took over the tow of TB.12, assisted by destroyer Cynthia, progressed slowly while the TB gradually settled, sinking at 1055 [presumably on the 11th] in 51.44.40N 01.26E. Lt Bulteel and 22 ratings lost [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/sc/tn/un; ADM.156/15];

TB.10, ex-Greenfly, Lt-Cdr John McLeod RN. Alongside TB.12, trying to take her in tow, then believed torpedoed herself at 1610 and broke in half, the two halves rising vertically before sinking off the Sunk LV [He/un – confirmed mined]; 22 ratings lost, one more DOW [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/sc/tn/un; ADM.156/15]

TB.32, torpedo boat – see MAYFAIR, naval motor boat, 19 April 1915, North Sea

TB.83 - see TB.96, torpedo boat, 1 November 1915, Straits of Gibraltar

TB.88-97 - see TB.96, torpedo boat, 1 November 1915, Straits of Gibraltar

TB.92, torpedo boat, 6 May 1915, Western Mediterranean - Thornycroft 140ft-type, 130t, 1894, 3-3pdr/3-14in tt, Gibraltar Patrol, with one or more TB's watching area to east of Gibraltar for expected U-boats entering the Mediterranean, sighted submarine. Torpedo fired at TB.92, 40 miles W of Alboran island, submarine dived and two attempts made to ram. Believed to be U.21 which left the Ems on 25 April, reaching Cattaro on 13 May [Rn/Cn/ge]

TB.96, torpedo boat, 1 November 1915, Straits of Gibraltar - White 140ft-type, 130t, 1894, 23kts, 3-3pdr/3-14in tt, 18 crew, TB’s 83, 88-97 formed the Gibraltar Local Defence Flotilla, Chief Gunner John Summer in command of TB.96. On patrol about 5 miles E of Gibraltar, in collision with mercantile fleet auxiliary or "troopship" SS Tringa at 0115 and sank rapidly. Tringa was presumably the 2,154grt squadron supply ship torpedoed and sunk three weeks later; 2 officers including Chief Gunner Summer and 9 ratings lost [ke - no casualties] [H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ke; ADM.137grt, built 194]

TEESWOOD, Admiralty blockship, 1,589grt, built 1882, 278ft, was Westwood Co, Christiana, Norway-reg, then The Admiralty, Middlesbrough-reg. [wi - in 58.53.02N, 02.53.50W]. Purchased 1914 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1914 in No.2 Barrier, Skerry Sound, between Glims Holm & Lamb Holm islands Only engine block remains [Lr/D/wi]

TENBY CASTLE, hired trawler, 23 November 1915, Norwegian Sea - 256grt, built 1908, Swansea-reg, hired 2/15, serving with 10th CS off Norway for inshore blockade duties, heavy gale. Swept by "terrific sea" and considerably damaged, put into Bessiker, near Kya Island for repairs which took three days assisted by Norwegian gunboat Hidalgo without any threat of internment, later reached Lerwick [D/bi]

TERN, hired trawler, 23 February 1915, off N Scotland - 199grt, built 1907, Kelsall Bros & Beeching, Hull-reg H.961, hired 10/14 as minesweeper [D/He - auxiliary patrol vessel], Admiralty No.548, Skipper Daniel Stather RNR [wi - J Lewis]. Wrecked [H - Mined] in Loch Erribol, E of Cape Wrath [wi - in 58.30N, 04.40W]; 6 ratings lost. Note: exclusion from Lloyds listing suggests loss was due to marine cause, confirmed by Hepper [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/wi; ADM.1/8413/55, ADM.1/8413/60]

TEST, destroyer - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914

TEUTONIC, armed merchant cruiser, North Atlantic, February 1915 - one of two armed merchant cruisers of 10th CS on Northern Patrol damaged in the winter gales, dates not known, possibly February. 9,984grt, built 1889, hired 5/9/14, on patrol in heavy seas possibly N of Shetlands. Six-inch shell unshipped from ready-use rack, exploded against bulwarks; no one injured, damage repaired by crew. See also CARIBBEAN [D/bi]

THAMES, Admiralty blockship, 1,327grt, built 1887, 279ft, Carron Co, Grangemouth-reg. Purchased 1914 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1914 No.1 Barrier in Kirk Sound, between Lamb Holm island & Mainland [wi - in 58.53.30N, 02.54W]. Stern later removed and hull cut down to main deck [Lr/D/wi]

THE BANYERS, hired trawler – see BANYERS, hired trawler, 6 January 1915, North Sea

THE QUEEN, Admiralty collier, 17 August 1915, St George's Channel/Atlantic off SW England - coastal collier, 557grt, built 1897, John Hay & Sons, Glasgow-reg, Mr D Macalister, Ayr for Devonport with coal. Captured by U.38 [Max Valentiner] and sunk by gunfire, 40 miles NNE of The Smalls LH, E of Milford Haven [wi - in 52.15N, 05.05W]. One of three Admiralty colliers sunk at the time – see also GLENBY, KIRKBY [H/L/Lr/te/un/wi]

THE RAMSEY, armed boarding steamer, 8 August 1915, North Sea – the Moray Firth field of nearly 400 mines was laid by German auxiliary minelayer Meteor [1,912grt, ex-British Vienna seized Hamburg 4/8/14], night of 7th/8th to foul the approach to Cromarty and the Grand Fleet base of Invergordon, was discovered the morning of the 8th by a minesweeping trawler. That same day she met The Ramsey [J/C - Ramsey], 1,443grt, built 1895, Isle of Man Steam Passenger Co, Douglas-reg, hired 28/10/14, 2-12pdr, Pendant No. M.14, attached to Grand Fleet, Lt-Cdr Harry Raby RNR [Rn - Lt P Atkins RNR; gf - refers to Acting-Lt Atkins RNR as senior surviving officer], on patrol SE of Pentland Firth. After laying mines in the Moray Firth [see 7 August], Meteor, flying the Russian flag, met The Ramsey around 0600 c70 miles ENE of Kinnaird Head in 58.20N, 00.05W "but nearer to Cromarty". The Ramsey signalled the stranger to stop, closed to about 80yds to lower a boat when the German ensign was hoisted and Meteor [c2-8.8cm/2tt/375 mines] attacked with gunfire and torpedoes, The Ramsey sank in three minutes [J - torpedoed; J/D - SE of Pentland Firth; C - off Firth of Forth; dx - off Moray Firth]; 53 lives lost - 5 officers including Cdr Raby, 23 ratings and 25 MMR [He – 65 lives lost, 33 survivors; gf - 54 lives], 4 officers and 39 men taken prisoner, Meteor headed back to Germany, but was scuttled next day and the British POW's released. Note: D - "The Ramsey" is in Navy Lists as "Ramsey" [H/J/L/Lr/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/gf/kp; ADM.1/8430/241]

THESEUS [01], light cruiser – see HAWKE, light cruiser, 15 October 1914, North Sea

THESEUS [02], light cruiser, 21 October 1915, Aegean Sea - Royal Navy bombarded Dedeagatch in what was then Bulgaria. Monitors M.16, M.19, M.29 [M.15, M.28 in one source], bulged old cruiser Theseus and old light cruiser Doris took part [dx]

THISTLE IV, hired drifter, 30 June 1915, Irish Sea - 71grt, built 1906, Inverness-reg INS163, hired 5/15 as net tender, Admiralty No.2861. Rammed by Elder-Dempster liner Tarquah [3,859grt] in belief the vessel was a U-boat, sank off Great Orme's Head, Llandudno [wi - in 53.22N 03.52W]; no lives lost [H/C/D/He/dk/wi/dh; ADM.137/128]

THOMAS W IRVIN, hired trawler, 27 August 1914, North Sea - one of two hired trawlers mined in Tyne field laid by German Albatros. 201grt, built 1911, R Irvin & Sons, Aberdeen-reg A421, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, unarmed, Admiralty No.61, Skipper Henry Charles Thompson RNR, one of four minesweepers under command of Cdr R W Dalgety RN Rtd, Tyne Minesweeping Base. Left harbour around 0530 to sweep the area, twenty-eight miles off the mouth of the River Tyne. Seven mines swept and destroyed in the afternoon. Preparing to connect up another sweep at 1625, detonated mine, broke up and sank quickly [wi - in 55.01N, 01.22.45W]; 3 ratings lost. See also German Minelaying Raid on English East Coast - 25th/26th August 1914, and CRATHIE [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/wi; ADM.137/1002]

THORNHILL, collier – see AUDACIOUS, dreadnought, 27 October 1914, off N Ireland.

THORPWOOD, Admiralty collier, 8 October 1915, Central Mediterranean - 3,184grt, built 1912, Middlesbrough-reg, Joseph Constantine, Dunston/Tyne for Malta with coal. Captured by U.39 [Walter Forstmann], sunk by gunfire 122 miles S of Cape Martello, Crete [L - 100 miles S of Candia/Heraklion, which happens to lie on the north coast] [H/L/Mn/Lr/te/un]

TIGER, battlecruiser - see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915. improved Lion-class, 35,700t, 8-13.5in/12-6in/4-21in tt. Hit by 6 shells including one 11in on Q-turret, splinters jammed training gear and left turret out of action; 1 officer and 9 men killed, 3 officers and 5 men wounded [Cn - 10 crew killed, 11 wounded]. Repaired by 8 February. See also LION, METEOR [Rn/Cn/D/ti]

TOM TIT, hired trawler, 26 December 1914, North Sea – one of two hired trawlers lost in gales. 169grt, built 1904, Kelsall Brothers & Beeching, Hull-reg H35, hired 11/14 as minesweeper [D/He - auxiliary patrol vessel], Admiralty No.424, Skipper John CarIton RNR. Driven ashore around 1030 in gale and wrecked near Peterhead, N of Aberdeen [wi - in 57.30N, 01.46W]; no lives lost from Tom Tit, but local lifeboat Alexander Tulloch was wrecked while assisting and lost three of her crew. See also FAIR ISLE [H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/wi; ADM.137/82]

TOPAZE, light cruiser – see FORMIDABLE, battleship, 1 January 1915, English Channel.

TOUCHSTONE, hired trawler – see JAPAN, hired trawler, 16 August 1915, North Sea

TOUTOU [01], gunboat – see MIMI, gunboat, 23 December 1915, German East Africa Campaign

TOUTOU [02], gunboat – see MIMI, gunboat, 26 December 1915, German East Africa Campaign

TRAFALGAR, possibly Admiralty collier, 23 August 1915, Atlantic off SW Ireland - [wi - on Admiralty charter], 4,572grt, built 1911, Glasgow-reg, Glasgow Shipowners, 31 crew, Mr W Peter Mejillones for Clyde with nitrates. Stopped by U.38 [Max Valentiner] and sunk with bombs 54 miles SW by W of Fastnet Rock, off Co Cork [L - 54 miles SW of; wi - in 50.39N, 10.27W]. One of two vessels sunk by U.38 at this time – see also SILVIA [H/L/te/un/]

TRENT, fleet messenger – see MERSEY, monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa

TRIAD, armed yacht - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

TRINGA [01], Admiralty store or squadron supply ship – see TB.96, torpedo boat, 1 November 1915, Straits of Gibraltar

TRINGA [02], Admiralty store or squadron supply ship, 26 November 1915, Central Mediterranean - 2,154grt, built 1913, Cork SS, hired 28/11/14 as RFA, Pendant No. Y9.21, probably not commissioned, Malta for Gibraltar, no cargo. Captured by U.33 [Konrad Gansser], sunk by gunfire 30 miles NE by N of Galita Is, off NW Tunis [L - 40 miles N of Cani Rocks]; 3 lives lost [H/LC/D/te/un]

TRIUMPH [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

TRIUMPH [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

TRIUMPH [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

TRIUMPH [04], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 1 March 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

TRIUMPH [05], battleship – see SWIFTSURE, battleship 5 March 1915, Turkish Coastal Operations

TRIUMPH [06], battleship, 6 March 1915, Smyrna Blockade - Triumph, Swiftsure-class and Euryalus, armoured cruiser, Cressy-class, 12,000t, 2-9.2in/12-6in, taking part in blockade of Smyrna to prevent it being used as a submarine base. The intention was to destroy the forts ready for an attack, with minesweeping trawlers sweeping ahead, covered by Triumph, Swiftsure and Euryalus. Turks opened heavy and accurate fire forcing the trawlers to withdraw, Triumph, Euryalus and minesweepers hit; 1 officer DOW, 1 officer and 6 ratings wounded [Rn/Cn/D]

TRIUMPH [07], battleship – see OKINO, Admiralty trawler, 8 March 1915, Smyrna Blockade

TRIUMPH [08], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

TRIUMPH [09], battleship - see E.15, submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

TRIUMPH [10], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

TRIUMPH [11], battleship, 25 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign - First U-boat attacks on ships off Gallipoli by U.21 [Lt-Cdr Otto Hersing]:

VENGEANCE, battleship, Canopus-class, zigzagging up from Mudros to meet sister-ship Canopus and relieve her as gunfire support ship off Anzac Cove, submarines were expected in the area and a periscope was spotted at 0730 off the Dardanelles entrance, it was also seen heading north and at one point passed between battleships Swiftsure and Agamemnon, then disappeared, sea calm and visibility good. Due east of Cape Kephalo, Imbros island at 1000, Vengeance spotted a torpedo coming towards her from shorewards, swung clear and continued on to Gaba Tepe. Alarms and sightings continued during the morning [Rn/D/ge];

TRIUMPH, battleship, Swiftsure-class, 11,985t, building as Chilean Libertad, launched 1903, purchased by Admiralty before completion, 4-10in/14-7.5in/14-14pdr/2-18in tt, 20kts, c700 crew, China Station 8/14, later to Mediterranean, Capt Maurice Fitzmaurice, providing gunfire support for Anzac beachhead, under way off Gaba Tepe with nets down, light guns manned and watertight doors closed, destroyer Chelmer patrolling round her at 15kts. Periscope sighted at 1225 on Triumph's starboard beam, Chelmer dashed for it, Triumph started firing but a a minute later a torpedo fired by U.21 [J - U.51] passed through the nets and hit her, almost immediately took on 10° list and continued to heel over. Chelmer came under her stern walk to take off a large number of men, capsized 10min after being hit, floated bottom-up for 30min then sank bow first just NW of Gaba Tepe off Ari Burnu/Anzac Cove. The scene was apparently so dramatic and unexpected, ANZAC and Turkish troops reportedly stopped fighting and stood to watch her end; 3 officers and 52 ratings lost [Rn/Cn/He/ke - 3 officers, 70 men lost, over 500 survivors]. With the U-boat threat, continuous battleship support was no longer possible, a severe blow to the Australian and New Zealand troops [H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ke/mf; ADM.116/1444]

TRYGON, hired trawler, 30 March 1915, off SW Scotland - 289grt, built 1908, Fleetwood-reg FD.221, Mount Steam Fishing, hired 1914 as minesweeper [D - 2/15 as auxiliary patrol vessel; He – 1915 as patrol vessel], Admiralty No.978, Lt Henry Oakley RNR [wi - J Price, Captain]. In collision with SS Myrtle Grove, 2,640grt [ms - Myrtlegrove], foundered in River Clyde [wi - exact position unknown, but River Clyde, in 55.58N, 04.52W]; no lives lost [H/Lr/C/D/He/ms/dk/fd/wi; ADM.137/103]

TURQUOISE, fleet messenger, 31 July 1915, Atlantic off SW England - One of two Admiralty fleet messengers sailing in company from Glasgow under sealed orders, bound for Dardanelles, heavy seas with SW force 8 gale blowing, sunk by U.28 [Georg-Günther Freiherr von Forstner] off the Scillies. Ex-coaster, 486/c1892, Glasgow-reg, W Robertson, hired 2/7/15, Pendant No. Y4.30, 15 crew, Lt John McNicol RNR, sailing for Bizerta in ballast. In the afternoon sighted surfaced submarine on starboard bow which rapidly approached, ordered to stop but attempted to ram, U.28 opened fire around 1600 making several hits, ship immediately abandoned and sank at 1615, 60 miles SW of Scillies [wi - attacked in 49N, 07.08W, sank 40 miles SW of, in 49.00N 07.00W]; one life lost, probably Merchant Navy [He/wi - chief engineer killed by gunfire, two crew wounded], survivors picked up by patrol trawler, landed at St Mary’s next day. See also NUGGET [H/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/1130]

TYNEDALE, Admiralty blockship, 2,948grt, built 1889, 320ft, SS Tynedale of Belfast Co, Belfast-reg. Purchased 1914/15 for Sunderland, Durham - final scuttling location not known [Lr/D]

TYNEMOUTH, Admiralty collier - see SATRAP, Admiralty collier, 31 December 1915, N or W British Waters


U

UNDAUNTED [01], light cruiser, 17 October 1914, Action off the Texel - Undaunted, Arethusa-class, 3rd DF leader, Capt Cecil Fox, and Lance, Lennox, Legion, Loyal, destroyers, I-class, c970t, 1913/14, 3-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, 1st Div, 3rd DF, all Harwich Force, off Dutch coast on patrol for German flotilla movements, on station in the Broad Fourteens at 1400, then 50 miles SW of Texel. Smoke sighted and four German 400t torpedo boats spotted, Undaunted signalled “General Chase” and by 1630 all four - S.115, S.117, S.118, S.119 had been sunk by gunfire [dx - 40 miles SW of Texel], British destroyers slightly damaged; Loyal had an officer and two ratings seriously wounded, one of the ratings dying; Legion had two ratings wounded [Rn/Cn/D/dk/dx]

UNDAUNTED [02], light cruiser – see EMPRESS, seaplane carrier, 25 December 1914, Cuxhaven Raid

UNDAUNTED [03], light cruiser – see BATTLE of THE DOGGER BANK, 24 January 1915.

UNDAUNTED [04], light cruiser, 15 February 1915, Dover Straits - Arethusa-class, 3rd DF leader, Harwich Force and eight destroyers, probably division of 3rd DF on passage from Harwich to Irish Sea because of increased U-boat activity there. Unsuccessful U-boat torpedo attack off Dungeness, possibly by U.16 [Rn/Mn/Cn/D/ty]

UNDAUNTED [05], light cruiser, 24 March 1915, North Sea - Arethusa-class, 4,400t, 3rd DF leader and Landrail, destroyer, L-class, c1,300t, 3rd DF, Harwich Force, in collision. Damaged to Undaunted not known but three crew drowned, Landrail towed home with badly crumpled bow [D/dk]

UNDAUNTED [06], light cruiser, 24 April 1915, North Sea - Arethusa-class, 4,400t, 3rd DF leader and LANDRAIL, destroyer, L-class, c1,300t, 3-4in/1-12pdr/4-21in tt, 3rd DF, Harwich Force sailed on the 23rd with carrier Empress for a seaplane raid on the German coast, good weather lasted until around 0500 on the 24th when dense fogbanks were encountered near the take-off position. During manoeuvres, Landrail hit Undaunted in the engine-room at 18kts holing her badly, Landrail lost 20-30ft of her forecastle, and both had their wireless knocked out, making it difficult to inform Cdre Tyrwhitt in Arethusa. Undaunted made her way home with 3ft of water in the engine-room, Landrail was towed stern-first by destroyer Mentor and then light cruiser Aurora, both having towing-hawsers part twice in rising seas. At 1830 and drifting close to Terschelling on a lee shore, Arethusa, after her own two failed attempts took up the tow and headed for Yarmouth at 4kts, reaching there at 2100 on the 26th, 71 hours after the collision. Two tugs took Landrail to Chatham where repairs took 5 weeks. Their last collision has been exactly one month before, on 24 March! [Cn/D/dd/gr/ty]

UNDAUNTED [07], light cruiser – see ARETHUSA, light cruiser, 2 June 1915, North Sea

UNITY, destroyer - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914

URMSTON GRANGE, Admiralty blockship, 3,423grt, built 1894, Houlder Line, London-reg. Purchased 1914 for Scapa Flow, scuttled 1914 in about 40-60ft depth in Burra Sound, between Hoy & Graemsay islands [wi - in 58.55.40N, 03.18.38W]. Dispersed by explosives in 1962 to clear shipping channel [Lr/C/wi/www]

USK, destroyer - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

VALIANT, Admiralty yacht, 20 December 1914, North Sea - One of two hired auxiliaries mined in the Kolberg-laid Scarborough field. 1,855grt, built 1893, hired 18/11/14, Cdr C Barlow RNR [Adm Rtd], heading for Cromarty. Mined off Filey about 0900, propellers and rudder blown off, two trawlers brought her into Scarborough. Next day, taken in tow by yacht Eileen for the Humber and on to Isle of Wight for repairs; no lives lost. See also GARMO [Rn/Mn/ap/dk/sc]

VALIANT II, armed yacht – see BERKSHIRE [2], Admiralty trawler, 15 May 1915, North Channel

VAMPIRE, gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

VELOX, destroyer, 25 October 1915, English Channel - C-class, 445t, 1902, 1-12pdr/5-6pdr/2-18in tt, 27kts, c63 crew, Pendant No. D.71, probably Portsmouth Local Defence Flotillas, Lt Frank Pattinson RNR, believed on patrol from there. Mined, laid by UC.5 [Herbert Pustkuchen] a week before, off Nab LV [wi - off Bembridge Ledges, sank 1.5 miles E of Bembridge, IoW in 50.41.31N, 01.02.05W]; 4 ratings killed by explosion [wi - 12 lost]. Wreck lies at 30ft, sold in 1970, stripped and dispersed by explosives [+J/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/dx/ge/un/wi; ADM.1/8438/329]

VENERABLE [01], battleship, 28 October 1914, Belgian Coast - London-class, 5th BS Channel Fleet, Brilliant, old cruiser, Apollo-class [expended at Zeebrugge in 1918], Wildfire, old composite sloop, Nymphe-class, Rinaldo, old sloop, Condor-class, together with gunboat Bustard and three monitors, bombarding targets between Westende and Lombartzyde. Serious damage only avoided by continual course alterations although Wildfire badly hit on the waterline and sent home for repairs. In the afternoon Venerable ran aground but was helped off on rising tide by Brilliant with no damage, Brilliant [Rn/dp - one man killed, several wounded] and Rinaldo [Rn - 8 wounded] hit; only confirmed life lost was 1 rating in Rinaldo on 29th [Rn/D/dk]

VENERABLE [02], battleship - see MAORI, destroyer, 7 May 1915, Belgian Coast

VENGEANCE [01], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 19 February 1915, First Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

VENGEANCE [02], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 25 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts

VENGEANCE [03], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 26 February 1915, Second Bombardment of Outer Dardanelles Forts, continued

VENGEANCE [04], battleship – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows

VENGEANCE [05], battleship - see E.15, submarine, 17 April 1915, Dardanelles Campaign

VENGEANCE [06], battleship - see GALLIPOLI CAMPAIGN, 25 April 1915, Allied Landings

VENGEANCE [07], battleship – see ALBION, battleship, 2 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

VENGEANCE [08], battleship – see TRIUMPH, battleship, 25 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

VENGEANCE [09], battleship – see HEROIC, armed boarding steamer, 25 June 1915, Aegean Sea

VENUS, light cruiser, November 1914 - Eclipse-class, 5,600t, Ireland-based 11th CS. November - Lost foremast in gale, British Isles waters [Cn/D]

VESTAL, old sloop, 30 October 1914, Belgian Coast - Condor-class, 980t, 6-4in/4-3pdr, taking part in bombardment of Westende area. Hit on forecastle about 1100 by same 8in battery that hit Falcon, possibly disabled; 1 rating killed [Rn/dk/dq]

VIGILANT, gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

VIKING [01], destroyer – see AMAZON, destroyer, 20 October 1914, Belgian Coast

VIKING [02], destroyer – see LEVEN, destroyer, 8 September 1915, Dover Straits

VIKING [03], destroyer – see BRIGHTON QUEEN, paddle minesweeper, 6 October 1915, Belgian Coast

VIKNOR, armed merchant cruiser, 13 January 1915, Atlantic off N Ireland - ex-Viking or The Viking, ex-cruise ship, 5,386grt, built 1888, Viking Cruise Co, 15kts, hired 19/11/14, Pendant No. M.82, 10th CS Grand Fleet, Cdr Ernest Ballantyne, most northerly ship on Northern Patrol line B north of the Shetlands. On the 11th, at around 62N, 02.24W, intercepted Norwegian SS Bergensfiord carrying an important German secret service agent and other nationals from New York, Viknor ordered to put prize crew on board, escort the Norwegian ship towards Lerwick, then continue on to Liverpool with a total of eight German prisoners. Last message from Viknor on 13th [He – off Malin Head; ss - at 1600 in 56.18N, 09W, course S21ºW], nothing more was heard of her. Probably 13th - Believed sunk off Northern Ireland by one of Berlin's mines broken free by heavy gales off Tory Island [Rn - foundered in heavy weather; C - Wrecked on north coast of Ireland], wreckage and bodies washed ashore at Portrush; 294 lives lost - 22 officers, 196 ratings, 74 MN and 1 canteen staff plus prisoners, no survivors [He – 259, ke - 295] [H/J/Rn/C/D/bi/dk/gf/ke/ss; ADM.137/185, ADM.116/1442]

VINCENZO FLORIO, Admiralty blockship – see MARIE DELLE VITTORIE, Admiralty blockship, 29 December 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

VINDICTIVE, cruiser – see CARNARVON, armoured cruiser, 22 February 1915, Central Atlantic

VIRGINIAN, armed merchant cruiser, 17 April 1915, SW Scotland - 10,760grt, built 1905, hired 13/11/14, 10th CS. Ran ashore in Clyde opposite Govan Ferry, blocked river and delayed armed merchant cruiser Oropesa leaving for her patrol [Mn/D]

VULTURE, destroyer – see LIGHTNING, destroyer, 30 June 1915, North Sea


W

WALRUS, locally converted to gunboat, Niger Flotilla – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 7 September 1914, German West Africa

WARREGO [RAN], destroyer – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions

WARSPITE [01], dreadnought, 16 September 1915, North Sea - Queen Elizabeth-class, 31,500t, completed 3/15, 5th BS Grand Fleet. Damaged by grounding off Dunbar in the Firth of Forth, repaired [Cn - at Rosyth 17/9-20/11/15; gf - Tyne], rejoined 5th BS on 23/11/15 [Cn/gf/gr]

WARSPITE [02], dreadnought, 3 December 1915, North Sea - Warspite and Barham, dreadnoughts, Queen Elizabeth-class, 31,500t, 5th BS Grand Fleet, Barham only completed in October, carrying out battle exercises westward from Scapa. Warspite collided with Barham, Barham holed starboard side abreast of quarterdeck, both ships in dock for a long period - Barham at Invergordon 8-23/12/15, Warspite at Devonport 11-21/12/15. Corbett describes Warspite, the ship with the most battle honours of World War 2, as "that unlucky ship", yet Warspite survived the war and Barham, after ramming and sinking a destroyer in 1939, was lost in 1941 [Rn/Cn/gf/gr]

WATERLILY, Admiralty drifter, 23 July 1915, English Channel - 82grt, built 1907, Banff-reg BF595, hired 5/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2171, Skipper George Slater RNR. Fitted out at Devonport and now sailing for Granton to take up duties, in collision with trawler Ouse [not believed taken into Admiralty service until 2/16] at 0500 off St. Alban's Head, Dorset [wi - in 50.30N 02.00W] and foundered; no lives lost [H/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/132]

WAVENEY, destroyer - see German Raid on Hartlepool, Scarborough and Whitby, 16 December 1914

WEAR, destroyer – see DARDANELLES CAMPAIGN, 18 March 1915, Final Naval Attack on the Narrows; also IRRESISTIBLE, battleship

WEELSBY, hired trawler - see C.33, submarine, 4 August 1915, North Sea

WESTWARD HO [01], paddle minesweeper – see BRIGHTON QUEEN, paddle minesweeper, 6 October 1915, Belgian Coast

WESTWARD HO [02], paddle minesweeper – see DUCHESS OF HAMILTON, paddle minesweeper, 29 November 1915, North Sea

WESTWARD HO [03], paddle minesweeper – see LADY ISMAY, paddle minesweeper, 21 December 1915, North Sea

WEYMOUTH [01], light cruiser – see FOX, light cruiser 12 January 1915, German East Africa Campaign.

WEYMOUTH [02], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 6 July 1915, German East Africa

WEYMOUTH [03], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 11 July 1915, German East Africa

WEYMOUTH [04], light cruiser – see DARTMOUTH, light cruiser, 29 December 1915, Adriatic Sea

WHITBY ABBEY, screw minesweeper - see BARRY, fleet messenger, 18 August 1915, Aegean Sea

WILDFIRE [01], old sloop, 23 October 1914, Belgian Coast - Myrmidon, destroyer, B-class, with patrol flotillas and Wildfire, Nymphe-class, two of the various unsuitable vessels operating as gunboats in support of the Alled armies. U-boat attack failed [Rn/D/dp]

WILDFIRE [02], old sloop – see VENERABLE, battleship, 28 October 1914, Belgian Coast

WILLIAM MORRISON, hired trawler, 28 November 1915, North Sea - 211grt, built 1915, Aberdeen-reg A355, Aberdeen Pioneer Steam Fishing, hired 9/15 as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.3217, believed Harwich-based. Mined, laid by UC.7 [Franz Wäger] earlier in the day, sank near Sunk Head Buoy, off Harwich [He - 51.52.40N, 01.31E, wi - in 51.47.30N, 01.30E]; 3 ratings lost [H/L/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/844/346]

WINIFRED, lake steamer, 7 March 1915, German East Africa Campaign - British lake steamers Winifred and Kavirondo drove German gunboat Mwanza ashore at the southern end of Lake Victoria and established local control [dx]

WOLVERINE [01], destroyer – see SCORPION, destroyer, 27 April 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

WOLVERINE [02], destroyer – see GOLIATH, battleship, 13 May 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

WOOD, Admiralty blockship, 28 October 1914, Eastern Mediterranean - scuttled, no other details [source uncertain]

WORSLEY, hired trawler, 14 August 1915 - 309grt, built 1913, E C Grant, Grimsby-reg GY814, hired 1914 as minesweeper [D - 7/15 as auxiliary patrol vessel], 1-3pdr, believed Harwich-based, Lt James Feetham RNR. On patrol with a second trawler along the Suffolk coast between Sizewell and Shipwash LV, mined under the bridge at 1800, laid by UC.6 [Matthias Graf von Schmettow] the previous day, broke in two and sank in under two minutes, one mile N of Aldeburgh Napes buoy, off Suffolk [WI - in 52.09N, 01.36.30E]; Lt Feetham lost [H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3123]

WRESTLER, hired tug, 10 October 1915, Location Not Known - 346grt, built 1876, hired on harbour service 1915. Lost, no other details. Note: Dittmar lists hired screw tug Wrestler, 192grt, built 1914, hired 1916 [also in Colledge] and rescue tug Wrestler, 192grt, built 1915, hired 14/1/16, both of which survived the war. Finally, Miramar Ship Index [ms] confirms the Dittmar listings and also has Wrestler, tug, 338grt, built 1876, Liverpool Steam tug Co, in collision at Liverpool 24 March 1903, beached and broken up [C only]


X

X-Lighters – see SCOURGE, destroyer, 7 August 1915, Gallipoli Campaign

X.65, motor lighter – see PRINCESS VICTORIA, hired trawler, 7 November 1915, Atlantic off NW France

XERXES, hired trawler, 16 November 1915, North Sea - 243grt, built 1908, Swansea-reg SA55, Buckworth & Mumby, hired 12/14 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.835, Skipper F Hayes. Ordered from Aberdeen to escort oiler Burma, overhauling her and in collision, sank off Girdle Ness, near Aberdeen [H - mined, C/D/wi - in collision; wi - in 57.06N, 02W]; 3 ratings lost, 1 DOW. Note: exclusion from Lloyds listing suggests loss was due to collision [H/Lr/C/D/He*/dk/wi; ADM.156/18]


Y

YARRA [RAN], destroyer – see AUSTRALIA [RAN], battlecruiser, 14 September 1914, German Pacific Possessions


Z

ZEALANDIA, battleship – see ALBEMARLE, battleship, 6/7 November 1915, off northern Scotland




2.  JANUARY 1916 to 1919

Incomplete, but in preparation - to be integrated with 1914/15 lists when completed



A

A.10, submarine, 17 March 1917, SW Scotland - A-class, 190/207t, 1905, 2-18in tt, assigned to inshore local defence 8/14, training role until 1916/17, now paid off, moored alongside submarine depot ship Pactolus at Eglinton Dock, Adrossan on Firth of Clyde, no crew on board, and under "limited" care and maintenance with too many boats to look after and too few personnel. Water slowly leaked into ballast tanks, lost buoyancy and suddenly foundered at 0630. Raised and beached, not repaired, sold in April 1919 for breaking up (Cn/D/bw/on)

ABELARD, hired trawler, 24 December 1916, English Channel - 187grt, built 1909, Milford-reg M17, F R Greenish & E Gerrish, requisitioned/hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.151, Skipper William Miners RNR. Wrecked in uncertain circumstances, a “short distance 'two cables 240degrees from the Breakwater Beacon'”, Plymouth Breakwater, Devon (wi - in 50.19.53N, 04.08.27W); no lives lost. Masts stood 8 ft above the surface, salvage operations abandoned by 11/1/17 (H/Lr/C/D/dk/wi)

ACASTA, destroyer, 22 December 1917, English Channel - K-class, c1,300t, believed Devonport-based 4th DF. Damaged in collision with  SS Clan Cameron, possibly assisting her; three Able Seamen killed (Cn/dk/gr)

ACCEPTABLE, hired drifter – see GERMAN DESTROYER RAID ON DOVER STRAITS, 23 November 1916

ACHATES, destroyer, 17 February 1917, possibly English Channel – serving with 4th DF, Portsmouth as of 1 January 1917. In collision, two crew killed, both men commemorated on Chatham Naval Memorial, presumably drowned (dk/pl)

ACHATES, destroyer, 16 December 1917 - K-class, c1,300t, Devonport-based 4th DF. Lost bridge and funnel in heavy seas (D/Cn/gr)

ACHILLES, cruiser, 16 March 1917, North Sea - German commerce raider Leopard, 4,652grt, ex-British Yarrowdale captured 11/12/16 by raider Moewe, 5-5.9in/4-3.45in/2tt sailed from Germany, sunk in the North Sea near the Faeroes by armoured cruiser Achilles and armed boarding steamer Dundee. Went down with all hands including Dundee's boarding party of one officer and five men. Royal Navy Single Ship Action - Achilles and Dundee v LEOPARD 1917 (dx)

ACTION OFF HELIGOLAND BIGHT, 17 November 1917 - In the last action of the Great War involving British and German capital ships, 1st BCS, 1st CS, 1st and 6th LCS’s Grand Fleet totalling 5 battlecruisers, 2 light battlecruisers, 8 light cruisers and 19 screening destroyers, supported by 1st BS of 6 battleships with 11 escorting destroyers, sailed to attack German minesweeping forces in the heavily-mined Heligoland Bight. German small ships protected by light cruisers Nurnberg, Pillau, Königsberg, Frankfurt, supported by battleships Kaiser and Kaiserin near Heligoland. The German cruisers were surprised when 1st CS opened fire at 0737, but escaped under heavy smokescreens and the “threat to manoeuvre” from the minefields. One German trawler stopped at outset and later sunk, three British light cruisers and Koenigsberg damaged in the ensuing chase in around 55N, 06.30E. British ships withdrew just after 1000 when the German battleships came up:

CARDIFF, light cruiser, Ceres-class, 5,020t, 5-6in/2-3in, flagship 6th LCS. First to be hit at 0850 by light cruiser 5.9in shell on forecastle, started two fires, then near after control position and again in a torpedo adjustment compartment; 5 ratings killed, two DOW (Rn/Cn/D/dk/dx/nb);

CALYPSO, light cruiser, Caledon-class, 4,950t, 5-6in/2-3in, 6th LCS, Capt H Edwards. Hit at 0940 by 5.9in shell which penetrated upper conning tower before bursting, Capt Edwards mortally wounded on bridge, others in vicinity killed - in some accounts "entire bridge personnel killed", navigator unconscious and gunnery officer took over command, rate of firing slowed down; 1 officer, 8 ratings ratings killed, one more DOW (Rn/Cn/D/dk/dx/nb/nh);

CALEDON, light cruiser, Caledon-class, 4,950t, 5-6in/2-3in, broad pendant 1st LCS, Cdre Cowan. Hit on waterline at 0950 by 12in shell from opening salvo of the two German battleships when they arrived, but according to the “Official History” “fortunately did no damage”; Bennett quotes Cdre Cowan as saying she “got such a punch in the ribs... I thought she was going to drop in halves”. One of her guns also hit, probably earlier by a light cruiser shell, the whole crew killed or wounded including rammer O/S Carless aged 21, mortally wounded in the stomach, he continued serving his gun and clearing away casualties, collapsed then recovered, cheered on new gun’s crew and shortly died; 4 ratings killed, one DOW. Ordinary Seaman John Henry Carless posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross (Rn/Cn/D/dk/dx/nb/vc)

ACTIVE, scout cruiser, 14 September 1917, Dover Straits - Active-class, 3,440t, was 4th DF leader, Portsmouth, now believed Dover Patrol, later based at Queenstown (Cobh). In collision with British SS Ousel, 1,284grt, 1?m off E entrance to Dover Harbour, vessel sank with five crew drowned (Cn/D/dq/gr/wi)

ACTIVE III, hired drifter, 15 October 1917, St George's Channel - 81grt, built 1907, Banff-reg BF.771, W Barclay of Dundee, hired 4/15 as net drifter, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.2486, based at Milford Haven (un – minesweeping), 10 crew, Skipper Alexander Smith RNR. With group of eight trawlers and drifters in Dale Bay during the night, sailed at 0830 to patrol, when Active was mined, probably laid by UC.51 (Hans Galster) the day before. She blew up and sank off St Ann's Head, entrance to Milford Haven (He – 2 1/2 miles NW of Skokholm Island; un – between Grassholm and Skokham; wi - armed patrol vessel, lost in 51.40N 05.10W); 1 officer, 9 ratings lost, no survivors (H/L/C/D/He/dk/ps/un/wi; ADM.137/678; ADM.137/3268)

ACTON, Q-ship, 20 August 1917, Bay of Biscay - UC.72 sunk, Acton not damaged. According to U-boat.net, UC.72 survived this encounter but was mined in the Dover Straits returning to base, possibly 24 August (dx/un)

ADAMTON, Admiralty collier, 8 April 1916, Atlantic off W Scotland - 2,304grt, built 1904, Cardiff-reg, Seville & United Kingdom Carrying, Mr W Bartlett, Scapa Flow for Barry in ballast. Captured by U.22 (Bruno Hoppe), shelled and sunk 15 miles S of Skerryvore LH, W of Isle of Mull (L - 18 miles S by E1/2E of Barra Head, Outer Hebrides; wi - 17 miles NW of Skerryvore, in 56.32.30N, 07.26.30W); one man lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

ADEQUATE, hired motor drifter, 2 December 1916, Shetlands - c90grt, built 1903 (D - 41grt), Wick-reg WK109, hired 11/14 as harbour tender or coastal service craft, Adty Motor Boat No.158, harbour tender at Lerwick. In collision with armed drifter Emily Reaich (83grt), sank three cables SE off Kirkabista Light, Bressay island in 27 fathoms; no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/313)

ADRIAN, hired trawler, 13 March 1918, North Sea - 199grt, built 1900, Grimsby-reg GY1185, Allen Steam Fishing, hired 12/14 as minesweeper (wi - as armed patrol trawler), 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.820, believed Harwich-based. At anchor off Harwich. Run down in thick fog by SS Chyebassa, foundered off Harwich, Essex (wi - in 51.54N, 01.20E; He - about two cables from 'O' buoy in the war channel); no lives lost (H/Lr/C/He/D/dk/sc/wi; ADM.1/8496/190)

ADRIATIC, Admiralty chartered collier, 31 October 1916, possibly North Atlantic - 3,028grt, built 1904, Hull-reg, W H Cockerline, sailed Newport 31st for Marseilles with coal, went missing, posted by Lloyds 7/3/17. On or after 31st - Lost without trace and with all hands. Note: assuming she would have been reported passing Gibraltar, possibly went down in Atlantic (H/L/Lr/dk; Casualty list, dated 31st – 2 naval ratings only)

AGAMEMNON, battleship – see SUPERB, dreadnought, 13 November 1918, Turkish Surrender

AGILE, hired trawler, 27 April 1917, North Sea - 246grt, built 1907, Grimsby-reg GY263, W Grant, hired 12/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.697, believed Harwich-based, Skipper George Rushton RNR. Division of seven trawlers clearing field laid east of Sunk LV, completed one sweep and division reversed course, preparing to stream wires. Mined at 1020, laid by UC.11 (Benno von Ditfurth), sank rapidly after large explosion off Sunk Head LV, off Harwich (wi - in 51.54N 01.20E); 3 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3230)

AIVERN, hired drifter, 8 February 1917, English Channel - 72grt, built 1910, Inverness-reg INS325, hired 4/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.1802, Skipper Alexander Stewart RNR. One of nine drifters returning home from Mediterranean, poor weather in western English Channel. Sprang a leak and foundered (He – in 48.13N, 06.28N); crew rescued by other drifters, no lives lost (H/D/dk; ADM.137/357)

ALABURN, hired drifter - BELGIUM COAST OPERATIONS, 24 April 1916, North Sea

ALBACORE, destroyer, 9 March 1917, Orkneys - 440t, 1906. Mined, laid by UC.44 (Kurt Tebbenjohanns) off Kirkwall, damaged; 17 crew killed (D/dk/un)

ALBERTA, hired trawler, 14 April 1916, North Sea – the Humber minefield laid in August 1914 had continued to exist although parts of it were swept in the spring and early summer of 1916, two Grimsby-reg hired trawlers were lost while sweeping this “large enemy minefield”, sinking off Grimsby, Lincolnshire (He - 53.45N, 00.51E; wi - in 53.35N, 00.00). The mines had been laid by UC.7 (George Haag): ALBERTA, 209grt, built 1907, GY212, Dominion Steam Fishing, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.7, Skipper James Sargent DSC RNR. Sweeping mate Orcades went alongside but she too was blown up; 7 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/Mn/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8454/83); ORCADES, 270grt, built 1911, GY640, Dolphin Steam Fishing, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.40, 14 crew, Skipper Robert Frost RNR. Skipper and 5 ratings lost (sc - skipper and 11 crew, 2 survivors) (H/L/Lr/MnC/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8454/83)

ALBYN, paddle minesweeper, 2 September 1917, Dover Straits - Two Dover Patrol paddle minesweepers lying with other minesweepers alongside the quay at Dunkirk damaged in air-raids which lasted for 2-3 hours night of 2nd/3rd. Dunkirk, the main minesweeper base only 12 miles from German lines was subjected to frequent aircraft attacks. A merchantman was also damaged: ALBYN, ex-excursion paddle steamer, 363grt, built 1893, P & A Campbell's White Funnel Fleet, hired 26/5/15, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.587, Lt C King RNR. Took direct hit on stern, after part burned-out and seriously damaged, fire put out with help from other paddle sweepers including Plumpton and Lingfield; captain and 2nd engineer killed, several crew wounded. Towed to the Thames, took 6 months to repair and refit, returned to Dunkirk 1/3/18 (C/Cn/D/ap/dk/do/sc); LINGFIELD, Ascot-class, 810t, 29/4/16, 2-6pdr/2-2pdr. Badly damaged with over 100 holes from machine gun fire; two trimmers killed; X.171, X.173 and X.174, motor lighters, each lost a crew member killed at this time. A petty officer from X.25 DOW on the 7th (C/Cn/D/dk/do/sc)

ALFALFA, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 April 1917, Atlantic off SW England - 2,993grt, built 1898, London-reg, Buenos Aires Great Southern Railway, armed, Newport for Malta with coal, originally listed as lost, position not known. Torpedoed and sunk by UB.32 (Max Viebeg), 30 miles SW of Scillies (L/te - in 49.15N, 06.20W), no trace found of her; 30 lives lost including master and two naval seamen (H/L/Lr/dk/ge/te/un)

ALLANTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 3 January 1918, Central Mediterranean - 4,253grt, built 1901, T Dixon & Sons, Belfast, armed, sailing Hull to Malta with coal. Torpedoed by UB.50 (Franz Becker) and sunk 20 miles N of Cape Bon, Tunisia (un – 37.26N, 11.00E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ALMANAZORA, armed merchant cruiser, March 1916, Shetlands - 16,034grt, built 1914, hired 23/8/15, 10th CS, entering Swarbacks Minn in a gale. Possibly March - Fouled boom defences, wrapped them round propellers, anchored and managed to clear the "unpleasant tangle", to Liverpool for repairs, "greatly delayed by labour troubles in the shipyards" (D/Mn/bi)

ALYSSUM, fleet sweeping sloop – see ROSEMARY, fleet sweeping sloop, 4 July 1916, North Sea

AMALTHEA, armed yacht – see ARAB, destroyer, 4 July 1917, North Sea

AMBIENT, Admiralty chartered collier, 12 March 1917, North Sea - 1,517grt, built 1904, Sunderland-reg, Westoll Line, mostly coasting with Welsh and Scottish coals, 19 crew, Mr W Finnie, Sunderland for Dunkirk, in convoy in charge of a pilot. Mined starboard side under No.1 hold at 0840, field laid by UC.4 (Georg Reimarus), sank six minutes later about 7 miles N of Shipwash LV, off Orford Ness, Suffolk (te - 52.08.30N 01.46E; wi - in 52.07.52N, 01.45.42E, also 52.08.15N, 01.45.15E); crew picked up by minesweeper, landed at Lowestoft (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

AMBUSCADE, destroyer – see AUSTRALIA, battlecruiser, 22 April 1916, North Sea

AMEER, hired trawler, 18 March 1916, North Sea, 216grt, built 1908, Grimsby-reg GY397, E Sleight, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.38, Skipper Frederick Kemp RNR, Harwich-based, attached to Boys Training Establishment HMS Ganges. Mined, laid by UC.7 (Georg Haag), sank at 1520 off Felixstowe, Suffolk (wi - in 51.56.30N, 01.20E); Skipper and 8 ratings lost (He – 8 men lost) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.8451/59)

AMITY, drifter – see DELIVERER, hired drifter, 3 November 1917, Irish Sea

AMPLEFORTH, Admiralty chartered collier, 21 May 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,873grt, built 1914, Cardiff-reg, Ampleforth SS Co (C Cravos & Co), armed, sailing from Cardiff/Barry for Alexandria with coal and cased aeroplanes. Torpedoed by U.65 (Hermann von Fischel) 15 miles WSW of Gozo Is Light, Malta (un – in 36.10N, 13.30E); four crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

AMPLIFY, hired trawler, 17 January 1917, off W Scotland - 342grt, built 1916, Grimsby-reg GY789, Iceland Steam Fishing & Fish Curing, hired 1915 as minesweeper (D/wi - 2/16; wi - armed patrol trawler), 1-8pdr, Admiralty No.1982, Skipper William Grant RNR. Driven ashore in SE'ly gale, and wrecked at Skeirascape, Castlebay, Barra island (wi - in 56.57N, 07.30W). Salvage attempted but filled with water, heeled to 75 degrees and abandoned as constructive total loss; no lives lost (+Lr/C/D/dk/wi; ADM.137/350; ADM.137/351)

AMY, hired trawler, 270grt, 11 April 1917, English Channel - built 1914, (Lr/D/fd - 223grt, built 1905), Fleetwood-reg FD39, J Marr & Son, hired 1915 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.334, Skipper Thomas Dales RNR, sweeping field laid by UC.26. Mined, laid by UC.26 (Matthias Graf von Schmettow), not known when, sank off Havre, Seine Estuary (un – 2 miles NE of Whistle buoy in approaches to Havre); Skipper and 8 ratings lost (H/Lr/C/D/dk/fd/un; ADM.137/407)

ANNIE SMITH, hired drifter, 9 April 1918, Bristol Channel - 84grt, built 1907, Inverness-reg INS422, hired 4/15 as net drifter, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.2413, Skipper John Smith RNR. In collision with ss Ballycotton at 3.30pm, sank off Lundy Is, off Devon (wi - in 51.13N, 04.37W; He - about 4 miles SE of Lundy); no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.1/8496/190)

ANTHONY HOPE, hired trawler, 16 November 1916, English Channel - 288grt, built 1913, Hull-reg H1006, Newington Steam Trawling, hired 4/15, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1380, employed as minesweeper, Lt Herbert Field RNR. Clearing a minefield, mined, laid by UC.26 (Matthias Graf von Schmettow) the day before, sank near Whistle buoy, approaches to Le Havre, Seine Estuary; 2 wireless operators lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/un; ADM137/309)

ANWOTH, hired trawler, 10 December 1916, possibly North Sea – minesweeper. Three men killed and buried on English East coast. Reasons not known, possibly sweeping accident (dk)

APPLELEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 10 November 1917, North Sea - Leaf-class, 5,891grt/12,300t, armed, from Invergordon in light condition. Mined off North Suter, entrance to Cromarty Firth, towed in to Invergordon (H/L/D)

APHIS, river gunboat - see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign

APHIS, river gunboat, 4 November 1917, Palestine Campaign - 654t, 1915-16, 2-6in/2-12pdr/6mg, supporting British operations in Sinai near Gaza, river gunboats firing at an observation tower. Nearly hit by a Turkish shell at a maximum range of 12,000yds (Rn/Cn/D)

APLEY, hired trawler, 6 December 1917, English Channel - c250grt, built 1908, Neyland Steam Trawling & Fishing, Milford-reg M226, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.143, Lieutenant Frederick William Moody RNR, Minesweeping Officer, Portsmouth Trawlers. With group of trawlers sent to clear newly-discovered mines in the War Channel between Portmouth and Owers LV. Mined at 1125, field laid by UC.71 (Ernst Steindorff), blown up and sank off east end of Isle of Wight (D - off Worthing; He – in 50.36N 00.55.30W; wi - SE of Nab LV, in 50.36.59N, 00.56W); 11 crew lost (sc - captain and several crew members killed, “only two or three survivors” Including Lt Moody) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/636)

APPLELEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 10 November 1917, North Sea Leaf-class, 5,891grt/12,300t, armed, from Invergordon in light condition. - Mined off North Suter, entrance to Cromarty Firth, towed in to Invergordon (H/L/D)

ARAB, destroyer, 4 July 1917, North Sea - Scandinavian Convoy Attack, sailing from Lerwick. First week of July - U-boat attacked convoy, armed yacht Amalthea and armed whaler Pilot Whale opened fire, destroyer Arab dropped depth charges and submarine driven off. No further attacks on the route until loss of Mary Rose and Strongbow (ap)

ARCA, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 2 October 1918, Atlantic off N Ireland - 4,839grt, built 1912, Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London-reg, armed, 52 crew, Mr B Wilton, Philadelphia for Portishead with bulk benzine. Torpedoed by U.118 (Herbert Stohwasser), sank 40 miles NW by W of Tory Is, off Co Donegal (L/te/un/wi - in 55.45N, 07.35W); 52 lives lost including master (H/L/Lr/sl/te/un/wi)

ARCTIC PRINCE, hired trawler, 15 April 1917, Barents Sea - 194grt, built 1915, North-Shields-reg, Prince Fishing Co, hired 4/15 as minesweeper, sweeping off the NE corner of Ribachi Peninsula, north Russia. Originally listed as mined and damaged in April, reached Kola Inlet, subsequently towed back to England; six crew killed. Uboat.net confirms mine laid by U.75 (Curt Beitzen) off Murmane coast, Arctic Prince damaged on this date (Mn/D/un)

ARDANDEARG, Admiralty chartered collier, 14 March 1918, Central Mediterranean - 3,237grt, built 1895, Christian Salvesen & Co, Glasgow-reg, sailing from Malta with government stores and general cargo. Torpedoed by UC.54 (Heinrich XXXXVII (sic) Prinz Reuss), sank 86 miles E1/4N of Malta; master and one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ARDENT, destroyer – see AUSTRALIA, battlecruiser, 22 April 1916, North Sea

ARETHUSA [01], light cruiser – see CROWNSIN, Admiralty trawler, 4 May 1916, Central Mediterranean

ARETHUSA [02], light cruiser, 29 January 1916, North Sea - Arethusa-class, broad pendant Harwich Force, next attempt with Vindex to bomb airship bases, Vindex hoisting out seaplanes 20 miles off Ems estuary around 0500. One torpedo grazed the stern of Arethusa or ran under, then a second torpedo missed astern, with the enemy on the alert, the force withdrew again (Rn/Cn/ty)

ARGO, Admiralty chartered collier, 24 December 1917, Western Mediterranean - 3,071grt, built 1895, W H Vernall, West Hartlepool, armed, sailing Penarth for Alexandria with coal and general cargo. (te/un - 25th) - torpedoed by U.35 (Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière), sank 18 miles NW of Cape Tenez, W of Algiers, Algeria (un – in 36.42N, 01.01E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ARLANZA, armed merchant cruiser, 24 June 1917, North Atlantic area - 15,044grt, built 1912, hired 23/3/15, 10th CS. U-boat attack, narrowly missed by torpedo(es) (Mn/D)

ARNEWOOD, Admiralty chartered collier, 13 December 1917, off W Scotland - 2,259grt, built 1916, W France, Fenwick & Co, London, armed, from Barry with coal. Mined, laid by U.78 (Otto Dröscher), sank 4 miles ESE of Point of Sleat, Isle of Skye (L - 12 miles ESE of; un – in 57.01N, 05.54W, Barrage 56 laid 7 April 1917) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ARTIST, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 January 1917, St George's Channel - 3,570grt, built 1909, Liverpool-reg, Charente SS, armed, 35 crew, Mr G Mills, Newport for Alexandria with coal. Torpedoed by U.55 (Wilhelm Werner), sank 58 miles W1/2S of The Smalls, E of Milford Haven (te/wi - in 51.20N, 07.00W); 35 lives lost including master. Werner was on original British list of war criminals for sinking Artist without warning; progressed post-war as Naval Case No.11 but his whereabouts were unknown and the case did not go to court (+L/Lr/Mn/ge/os/te/un/wi; Casualty list – two naval ratings only)

ARTOIS, ex-Digby, armed merchant cruiser, 20 January 1916, Shetlands - 3,966grt, built 1913, hired 22/11/14, 10th CS, French-manned since 11/15. Collier went alongside in Swarbacks Minn, holed in port bow with crown of collier's starboard anchor (Mn/D/Cn/bi)

ASAMA, Q-ship, 16 July 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, trawler, 284grt, built 1914, Cardiff-reg CF12, Neale & West, Admiralty hired trawler in service as decoy ship from 1/17, 1-3pdr, continued working by her owners on fishing grounds in decoy role, but with naval gun crew. (L - 17th) – Captured by U.48 (Karl Edeling), sunk by gunfire 160 miles SW by S of Fastnet Rock, off Co Cork (D - 160 miles SW of; L - fishing 190 miles due W of Lundy Is, off Devon; He - 160 miles W of Fastnet in 48.45N, 10.25W; un – armed but not in RN service, also 190 miles due W of Lundy Island); one life lost, two men wounded, survivors rescued by destroyer. Note: listed in Navy section of HMSO as special service ship and in Merchant Shipping as trawler (H/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/qs/un; ADM.137/482)

ASHBY, Admiralty collier, 15 February 1916, Atlantic off NW France - 1,947grt, built 1896, West Hartlepool-reg, R Ropner. Wrecked off Ushant (Ashby 1,947grt attacked 24/6/16 - if the same vessel, the attack took place after her loss according to HMSO) (H/Lr)

ASPENLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 30 December 1916, English Channel - ex-Saxol, ex-dummy battleship No.5 ”Centurion”, ex-passenger-cargo steamship Tyrolia, ex-Lake Erie, Canadian Pacific Railway, 7,535/11,850t, armed, Pendant No.Y7.170, Port Arthur for Portsmouth with oil fuel. Mined, laid by UC.16 (Egon von Werner) off Owers LV, damaged, towed into port (H/L/C/D/ed/un)

ATTENTIVE, light cruiser – see GLORY, battleship, 7 March 1918, Russian Intervention

AU FAIT, hired drifter, 25 April 1916, North Sea - 83grt, built 1909, Lowestoft-reg LT364, hired 1/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.763, Dover Patrol, Skipper Arthur Bridge RNR, with 9th Drifter Division commanded by Cdr Venn, attending the net barrage off Belgian coast that was started on the 24th, at anchor off Raab Bank to SW of Zeebrugge. Three German torpedo boats came out of Zeebrugge to shoot up netted buoys and spotted around 0800 as the early mist cleared. The drifters were chased to the north and then ordered to scatter, Au Fait dropped behind, hit a number of times, stopped and captured (D - sunk) off Zeebrugge; no lives lost, Skipper and crew taken prisoner (H/L/Mn/C/DHe//ap/dk/dq)

AUSTRALIA, battlecruiser, 22 April 1916, North Sea - The Admiralty was aware by the 21st that the German High Seas Fleet was preparing to go to sea that same evening and ordered the entire Grand Fleet to sweep towards the Heligoland Bight, the bulk of it under Adm Jellicoe to concentrate the morning of the 22nd east of the Long Forties, 100 miles E of Aberdeen. Adm Beatty's battlecruiser fleet were 40 miles ahead while the Rosyth-based 3rd BS and 3rd CS would be ready to join later if needed. By noon on the 22nd, Adm Jellicoe was informed the Germans were returning to port, but the 4th LCS should sweep to the Skaw supported by the battle fleet, while the battlecruisers were to reach a position 75 miles NW of the Horns Reef by 1800 and cruise off there during the night of the 22nd/23rd. By the time Adm Beatty got to Horns Reef, dense fog had come down and battlecruisers Australia and New Zealand had been in collision. The fog off the Skaw similarly affected the main battle fleet, destroyers Ambuscade, Ardent and Garland were also in collision, subsequently followed by one between a merchantman and dreadnought Neptune. Weather cleared somewhat on the 23rd and the fleet cruised to the west of Little Fisher Bank. Once it had been confirmed the damaged destroyers were safe, the operation was abandoned and Adm Jellicoe headed back for Scapa Flow, especially to allow the destroyers to refuel:

AUSTRALIA, was flagship Royal Australian Navy, now Flagship 2nd BCS and New Zealand, presented by New Zealand to the Royal Navy, 2nd BCS, both Indefatigable-class, 22,110t, 8-12in/16-4in/3-18in tt. Reported at 1800 on 22nd that both had been damaged in collision and had to return to base. Australia missed Battle of Jutland, returned as Flagship 2nd BCS, New Zealand repaired in time for Jutland (Rn/Cn/D/gf/gr);

AMBUSCADE, ARDENT, GARLAND, K-class, c1,300t, 4th DF, with main battle fleet. In collision about midnight on 22nd off the Danish coast when the fleet carried out a turn in the dense fog, Ardent so seriously damaged, she had to be towed home stern-first, but still ready for Jutland (Rn/Cn/gf/gr);

NEPTUNE, dreadnought, 22,720t, 10-12in/16-4in/4-3pdr/3-18in tt, 1st BS, with main battlefleet. Neutral merchantman passed through the battle fleet during the fog early on the 23rd, collided with Neptune and did her “considerable injury” (Cn - not seriously damaged), repaired in time for Jutland (Rn/Cn/D/gf)

AUSTRALIA, battle cruiser, 12 December 1917, presumably north British waters or North Sea - Indefatigable-class, 22,110t, 1911, flagship 2nd BCS and Repulse, Renown-class, 8/1/16, 30,830t, 1st BCS, Grand Fleet battlecruisers. In collision, no more details (Cn/gr)

AXMINSTER, Admiralty chartered collier, 13 November 1917, North Sea - 1,905grt, built 1881, Capel & Co, London, armed, 22 crew, Mr W Scott, Blythe for Dieppe with coal. Originally believed torpedoed, now confirmed as mined, laid by UC.4 (Walter Schmitz) (master apparently saw conning tower of submarine which probably accounted for the assumption she had been torpedoed), exploded beneath engine-room at 1140, foundered at 1148 off Pakefield Gat, near Lowestoft, Suffolk (L - 2 miles S of Holm Bouy; te/un/wi - in 52.26N, 01.48E); three men in engine space killed by explosion, survivors got away in starboard lifeboat, picked up by minesweeper and landed at Lowestoft (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)


B

B.7, submarine, 4 June 1916, Adriatic Sea - B-class, 287/316t, 2-18in tt, trimmed down on the surface 15 miles SW of Pola. Attacked and bombed by Austrian aircraft, some damage, managed to dive out of trouble (Cn/md)

B.8 [01], submarine, 28 February 1916, Adriatic Sea - B-class, 287/316t, 2-18in tt, attached to Italian Fleet, returning to Venice from patrol off the Quarnero leading to Fiume. Periscope sighted abaft the beam and five minutes later torpedo came to the surface close by. Austrians made no claim for an attack (Cn/D/md)

B.8 [02], submarine, 24 May 1916, Adriatic Sea - B-class, 287/316t, 2-18in tt, attached to Italian Fleet, on patrol off Chioggia, SW of Venice. Austrian U.XI fired a torpedo at 0749 which missed as B.8 dived (Cn/md)

B.8 [03], submarine - see B.10, submarine, 9 August 1916, Adriatic Sea

B.9, submarine, 29 March 1916, Adriatic Sea - B-class, 287/316t, 2-18in tt, attached to Italian fleet, sailed Venice morning of 29th, trimmed down 15 miles off Pola. Spotted by two Austrian aircraft, bombed and straffed but undamaged, dived but surface ships came up, hunted for same time, finally managed to surface safely and return to Venice (Cn/md)

B.10, submarine, 9 August 1916, Adriatic Sea – B-class, 287/316t, 1906, 218in tt with 4 torpedoes, 12/6kts, 15 crew. One of a total of six B-boats allocated to British Adriatic Squadron to operate with the Italian submarine service. B.10, Pendant No.I.20, Lt Kenneth Mitchell, returned to Venice after patrol off Pola, tied up alongside Italian cruiser Marco Polo serving as depot ship, undergoing maintenance. Venice raided by 21 Austrian naval seaplanes flying from Trieste and Pola, B.10 hit on port bow at 2230 and sank in shallow water, the first submarine lost to air attack, no lives lost. Raised by Italian divers on 23rd, taken into dry dock for repairs, torpedoes still onboard. On the 31st, workman drilled near a partly full petrol tanks, sparks started a fire and the dock was flooded to put it out, B.10 damaged beyond repair, sold locally for BU (J/C/D/dx - Bombed and sunk while under repair; Cn - while converting to surface patrol boat, but these were not carried out on surviving B-boats until 1917 (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/go/na/on/wi; ADM.137/1227, ADM.137/2126); B.8, lying alongside B.10 was damaged by the explosion, some battery cells cracked (Cn/D/md)

B.11, submarine, 17 March 1916, Adriatic Sea - B-class, attached to Italian Fleet, returning to Venice from patrol, had a similar experience to that of B.8 on 28/2/16. Torpedo reported coming to the surface a short distance off the port beam, but no sign of periscope or a submarine. Austrians again made no claim for an attack (Cn/D/md)

BACCHANTE, cruiser, 21 February 1917, Irish Sea - Cressy-class, 12,000t, returned from Mediterranean late 1916, serving in Home waters, and Achilles, armoured cruiser, Warrior-class, 13,550t, 2nd CS GF. February - Damaged in collision, no other details. One officer on Bacchante killed (Cn/D/dk/gr)

BAKU STANDARD, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 11 February 1918, North Sea - 3,708grt, built 1893, Associated Oil Carriers (J I Jacobs & Co), Swansea-reg, armed, Mr A Torrance, sailing Greenock for Forth with crude oil/fuel oil. Torpedoed by UC.58 (Karl Vesper), sank 5 miles S by W1/2W of Tod Head, S of Stonehaven (L - 7 miles off Gourdon; wi - 4 miles E of Johnshaven, Gourdon, in 56.48.30N, 02.12.48W); 24 crew lost (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un/wi)

BALFOUR, hired trawler, 28 November 1917, south east England area - minesweeper, accidental explosion, either off Newhaven or Sheerness, three men killed (dk)

BANGARTH, Admiralty chartered collier, 13 December 1917, North Sea - 1,872grt, built 1906, Rea Shipping Co, Liverpool, armed, Mr J Clarkson, Methil for Dunkirk with coal. Torpedoed by UB.34 (Hellmuth von Ruckteschell), sank 13 miles NNE of the Tyne (L/te/un - in 55.14N, 01.23W; wi - in 55.13.44N, 01.19.14W); two crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BARON AILSA, Admiralty chartered collier, 9 May 1918, St George's Channel - 1,836grt, built 1912, Ardrossan-reg, Kelvin Shipping, armed, Queenstown for Barry with government stores. Torpedoed by UB.72 (Friedrich Traeger), sank 18 miles WNW of The Smalls, W of Milford Haven; 10 crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

BARON HERRIES, Admiralty store carrier, 22 April 1918, Atlantic off SW England - 1,610grt, built 1907, Ardrossan-reg, Kelvin Shipping, hired 15/8/14 as RFA, armed, Pendant No.8 (D - flotilla supply ship, then collier Y3.105 from February 1916), Lisbon/Huelva for Glasgow with copper ore, cork, fish oil, pyrites, resin. Torpedoed by U.91 (von Glassenapp), sank 43 miles N by W1/2W of Bishop Rock, Scillies (L/te/wi - in 50.27N, 07.06W; wi - but also 43 miles off South Bishop Rock, i.e. off SW Wales); 3 crew killed by the explosion, 2nd officer taken prisoner. Von Glassenapp was on original British list of war criminals for this sinking, case did not go to court (H/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/ge/os/te/un/wi)

BARRANCA, Q-ship, 26 April 1917, English Channel - aka Echunga, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, cargo ship, 4,124grt, built 1906, Elders & Fyffes, commissioned 6/16-5/17 as decoy ship Q.3 (D - in service 4/16-1/18; qs - to 5/17), c1-4in/2-12pdr. Torpedoed (un – not listed) and damaged, towed into Portsmouth. Note: not to be confused with Admiralty oiler Echunga 6,285grt, sunk 5 September 1917 (Lr/C/Cn/D/qs/sk/un)

BATOUM, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 19 June 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 4,054grt, built 1893, Associated Oil Carriers (J I Jacobs & Co), Swansea-reg, 1-4.7in QF, 42 crew, Mr E Laidman, sailing New Orleans for Queenstown (Cobh) with petroleum, steaming at 9kts under escort. Torpedoed by U.61 (Victor Dieckmann) abaft engine-room at 0710, engine and boiler-rooms flooded, sank 6 miles S of Fastnet Rock, off Co Cork (wi - in 51.17N, 09.36W); donkeyman killed by torpedo explosion, survivors rescued by escorting US destroyer, landed at Queenstown (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BATTLE OF JUTLAND – A summary of the battle is not included here. Instead only a listing of those British ships lost and damaged. With Naval-History.Net, readers can refer to the following contemporary sources: 1. British Despatches, casualties and honours; 2. "History of the Great War - Naval Operations" by Sir Julian S Corbett and Henry Newbolt, including plans within volume, Volume 3, Spring 1915 to June 1916; 3. "Grand Fleet, 1914-1916 - It's Creation, Development & Work" by Admiral Viscount Jellicoe ; 4. "Germany's High Seas Fleet in the Great War" by Admiral Reinhard Scheer

BEACON LIGHT, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 19 February 1918, off NW Scotland - 2,768grt, built 1890, Liverpool-reg, Bear Creek Oil & Shipping Co (C T Bowring & Co), armed, saling Liverpool for Scapa Flow with furnace fuel oil. (un – 10 February) - Torpedoed by U.91 (Alfred von Glasenapp), sank 15 miles SE of Butt of Lewis, Outer Hebrides (wi - in 58.27N, 05.48W); 33 lives lost including master, believed all those on board (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BEAVER, destroyer – see VALE OF LEVEN, hired trawler, 10 July 1917, English Channel

BECHUANA, Admiralty chartered collier, 4 September 1918, Atlantic - 4,148grt, armed, on Admiralty service from 1915. Attacked by U-boat, two torpedoes missed (H/tl)

BEDALE, Admiralty chartered collier, 6 October 1917, St George's Channel - 2,116grt, built 1914, Furness, Withy & Co, West Hartlepool, armed, Mr Woodruff, Cardiff for Berehaven with coal, stores. Torpedoed by U.96 (Heinrich Jess), sank 25 miles SE by S of Mine Head, Co Waterford (wi - 25 miles SE by E of, in 51.43.35N, 07.02W); three crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BEECHLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 3 January 1918, Mediterranean - Leaf-class, 5,861grt/12,300t, armed. U-boat attack, torpedo missed (H/D)

BEEMAH, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 April 1917, Atlantic off SW England - 4,750grt, built 1914, Whitby-reg, Rowland & Marwood SS Co (Headlam & Rowland), 1-12 pdr, Cardiff for Italy (te - Montevideo) with coal. Torpedoed by UB.32 (Max Viebeg), starboard-side in engine-room, one lifeboat destroyed, radio room out of action, sank within 5min, 30 miles SW by S of Bishop Rock (L - 30 miles SW of Scillies; un/wi - in 49.25N; 06.45W; un – also 49.24N, 06.47W); 3rd Engineer and 2 firemen killed by the explosion, survivors found by RN vessel and towed to St Mary's (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BEGONIA, Admiralty chartered collier, 21 March 1918, Atlantic off SW England - 3,070grt, built 1918, North Shields-reg, Stag Line, armed, Tyne/Plymouth for Salonica with Admiralty cargo. Torpedoed by UB.55 (Ralph Wenninger), sank 44 miles S by W of Wolf Rock, near Lands End; no lives lost (L/te/un - in 49.13N, 05.40W) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

BEGONIA, fleet sweeping sloop, 29 March 1916, Atlantic off S Ireland - Azalea-class, 1,200t, on patrol. Torpedoed by U.44 (Paul Wagenführ), towed into Queenstown; 2 ratings lost. Reconstructed at Haulbowline to resemble small coaster 1916-17, commissioned 8/17 as Q-ship Q.10 (Cn/D/qs/un)

BEGONIA, Q-ship, early October 1917, off English Channel(?) - aka Dolcis, Jessop, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, ex-fleet sweeping sloop, Azalea-class, 1,200t, 26/8/15, c2-4.7in/2-3pdr AA, 16kts, c90 crew, Pennant No.T.33, torpedo-damaged and rebuilt 1916-17 as decoy ship Q.10 at Haulbowline to resemble a coaster, recommissioned 9/8/17 (qs - with 3-12pdr/2-3pdr AA), Lt-Cdr Basil Noake. Sailed from Devonport to patrol western approaches to English Channel, went missing in October, believed torpedoed in the Atlantic. (C/Cn/D - 2nd; qs/sk - 6th; ke - 12th; dk - casualties listed on 6th; dx – 2 October 1918) - according to Kemp, Begonia was sighted by U.151 (dx - U.141) off Casablanca, dived to avoid detection, came up to periscope depth at what was thought a safe distance, but in fact right under Begonia, which tore away decking and left parts of the Q-ship’s propeller blades embedded in the casing. Moments later, Begonia stopped, heeled over and blew up, possibly because of water flooding in and exploding the boilers; all 7 officers, 89 ratings lost (He – 7 officers, 93 men), no survivors. Hepper discounts her being sunk off the North African coast in action with U.151 as this would have been well out of her patrol area. This incident probably involved destroyer Parthian. As no U-boat claimed her sinking, she may have been mined (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ge/ke; ADM.137/84)

BELGIUM COAST OPERATIONS
, 24 April 1916, North Sea - Dover Patrol sailed to lay the first Belgian coast mine and net barrage, between Nieuport and the entrance to the River Scheldt, to restrict the movements of the Flanders UB minelayers. The force included six divisions of net drifters, four large minelayers and escorting destroyers, six minelaying trawlers, two monitors, a division of Harwich Force destroyers and the Flanders coast patrol from Dunkirk. The ships were in place by 0400, and by 0730 had laid a 15 mile double line of mines and 13 miles of mined nets. It was probably around this time drifter Clover Bank was lost. The minelayers returned to port while the drifters and supporting ships watched the nets. The force was attacked by aircraft without result, and then about 1445, three German destroyers were sighted coming out of Zeebrugge. Destroyers Medea, Murray (commanded by naval author Taffrail), Melpomene, Milne chased them and opened fire, but came too close to the shore and were all hit by German shore batteries. Melpomene was stopped by a shell in the engine-room, Milne and Medea took her in tow at which point the German destroyers came out again from under the batteries, Murray engaged them with Medea after the latter had slipped her tow. Then the two monitors came into action and the Germans retired:

CLOVER BANK (1) or Cloverbank, hired drifter, 78grt, built 1912, Aberdeen-reg A379, hired 1/15 as net drifter, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.750, Dover Patrol, Skipper Alonzo Strowger RNR. A line of nets should have been laid seaward of a line of mines, but were positioned on the shoreward side. After shooting her nets, Clover Bank, the last vessel of her division, sailed the wrong way, detonated a newly-laid British mine and blew up off Zeebrugge; Skipper and 17 ratings lost, there were no survivors (He – the 18 men lost included 6 working onboard from drifter Alaburn) (H/L/Mn/C/D/He/ap/dk/dq; ADM.1/8454/89);

MILNE, MURRAY, M-class, c1,100t, 3-4in/2-1pdr pom-pom/4-21in tt, Harwich Force and MEDEA, MELPOMENE, ex-Greek, Medea-class, c1,200t, 3-4in/4-21in tt, 10th DF Harwich Force, enemy destroyers sighted at 1445, action started shortly after and lasted for 40min, ships came within 10,000yds of German shore batteries ranging from 4in to 12in. Murray hit on forecastle by 6in shell which passed through the ship's side without exploding, got clear with the help of a smoke-screen by 1550; Melpomene hit about 1540 by one of the last 4.1in shells fired by the destroyers, richochetted into her without exploding, engine-room flooded, speed dropped; Milne came up to take Melpomene in tow, but tangled the cable in one of her own propellers. Murray went ahead through the mined nets, followed by Melpomene with Milne on her port side and Medea on the other at which point the German destroyers came back out from under their guns, closed to 8,000yds and opened fire. Murray dropped back to within 6,000yds of them to lay a smoke screen across the other three destroyers' sterns, then joined by Medea and assisted by 12in shellfire from Prince Eugene, drove them away. This action lasted from 1640 to 1655 and again the shore batteries opened fire. Murray escaped by zigzagging and making thick smoke, Medea was hit by one shell on the quarter-deck, a second close to her funnels, and then by a third, but continued at full speed and all were clear in 5 or 6min; the after hit on Medea killed two men and wounded other shell-handlers. Milne went into the floating dock in Dover to have the cable unwound from her port propeller, Murray received a temporary patch on her bow until the next Chatham refit, Medea went to Chatham for repairs, and Melpomene was dry-docked in Dunkirk and patched up before sailing for an English dockyard (Rn/Cn/D/dd)

BELLVIEW, Admiralty chartered collier, 21 April 1918, Central Mediterranean - 3,567grt, built 1894, Hull-reg, Keighley Shipping, armed, Tyne/Barry for Malta with coal and general cargo. Torpedoed by unknown U-boat (un – U.32 (Kurt Albrecht)), sank 16 miles ENE of Cape Bon, Tunisia in 37.13N, 11.21E (H/L/Lr/te/un)

BEN HEILEM, hired trawler, 8 October 1917, North Sea - 196grt, c1914, Aberdeen-reg A470, R Irvin & Sons, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 1-12pdr/1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.97, Skipper John Henry Lawrence RNR. Ran aground off the Pier, Berwick, England-Scotland border in poor weather (wi - Berwick-upon-Tweed Pier light 0.13 miles 350º, in 55.46.01N, 01.59W); no lives lost. Attempts made to salvage her, but had to be abandoned as a wreck because of the weather (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/456)

BEN HOLDEN, hired trawler, 17 April 1917, location not known – minesweeper. Mined; one crew killed, commemorated on Chatham Naval Memorial. U-boat.net does not list her as lost to a U-boat mine; she was presumably only damaged as she survived the war (D/dk/un)

BEN-MY-CHREE, seaplane carrier, 13 March 1916, Eastern Mediterranean - commissioned 1/15, 3,888t, flagship, East indies & Egypt Seaplane Squadron. Sometime before 13th - Damaged in collision, in dry dock at Suez 13/3-25/4/16 (Cn/D/bt)

BEN LAWERS, hired trawler, 9 December 1917,  English Channel - 176grt, built 1900, 1-12pdr/1-6pdr, hired 11/14, escorting French cross-Channel coal convoy. Rammed UB.18 just aft of conning tower, sank her in 49.17N, 05.47W, Ben Lawers so badly damaged “she was barely able to make port” (C/D/dx/ub/un)

BENTON CASTLE, hired trawler, 10 November 1916, English Channel - 283grt, built 1914, Swansea-reg SA1, Castle Steam Trawlers, hired 9/15 as “patrol sweeper”, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.1972, Lt Frederick Varley RNR, Skipper Alfred Thomas. (wi - 10/11/17) - Mined, laid by UC.17 (Ralph Wenninger) that day, sank off Dartmouth, Devon (wi - in 50.20N, 03.30W); 2 officers and 7 ratings killed, 1 rating died of injuried that day (He – 9 men lost) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.1/8473/264)

BERGAMOT, convoy sloop, 13 August 1917, Atlantic off NW Ireland - Anchusa-class built to resemble merchantmen, 1,290t, 5/5/17, 24in/2-12pdr, 17kts, c92 crew, within decoy organisation, believed serving with Grand Fleet, Lt Percy Perkins RNR, only in service for about two months (qs - served as decoy partner with submarine E.48), on patrol in Tory Island approach. Torpedoed by U.84 (Walter Roehr) about 70 miles W of North Ireland (un – in 55.13N, 10.17W), panic party sent off, prepared to open fire when submarine surfaced but foundered too quickly in the rough weather; 3 officers, 11 ratings lost (ke - no casualties, 98 survivors) (H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ke/qs/un)

BESTWOOD, Admiralty chartered collier, 29 July 1917, St George's Channel - 2,248grt, built 1913, London-reg, W France, Fenwick, 23 crew, Mr F Dyasan, Cardiff for Loch Ewe (wi - Milford Naval Base) with coal and drinking water. In collision with London-reg SS Leander, foundered 12 miles NW of South Bishop Rock, off Pembrokeshire (wi - in 52N, 05.37W); 16 crew lost, including two members of the Royal Marine Light Infantry (H/Lr/dk/wi)

BETSY SIM, Admiralty hired motor drifter, 18 July 1917, North Sea - 53grt, built 1902, Fraserburgh-reg FR931, hired 3/17 for local coastal patrol duties, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.3018. On patrol near Haisborough light vessel. In collision with collier Swansea Vale at 2200, foundered 15 minutes later near Haisborough LV, off Happisburgh, Norfolk (He – 52.48.30N, 01.36.30E; in D/wi – Light House); no lives lost (H/C/D/dk/wi, ADM137/483, ADM.137/528)

BILBROUGH, salvage vessel – see RACE FISHER, fleet messenger, 25 March 1919 (sic), Mediterranean

BILBSTER, Admiralty chartered collier, 21 November 1917, Atlantic W of NW Spain - 4,478grt, built 1908, Greenock-reg, Bilbster SS. In collision, sank in 43.30N, 13.24W (to the W of Cape Finisterre) (H/Lr)

BILSWOOD, Admiralty chartered collier, 12 March 1917, Eastern Mediterranean - 3,097grt, built 1915, Joseph Constantine, armed, Hull/Malta for Alexandria with coal. Mined, laid by U.73 (Gustav Siess), sunk 8 miles NW of Alexandria, Egypt (H/L/te/un)

BIRCH, hired trawler, 23 August 1916, North Sea - 215grt, built 1912, Grimsby-reg GY677, W Grant, hired 1914 (D - 2/15) as minesweeper, Admiralty No.1129, Skipper Edward Yallop RNR. With group of minesweepers sweeping War Channel approaches to Lowestoft. Mined at 1600, laid by UC.1 (Kurt Ramien) three days before, broke up and sank off Yarmouth (wi - in 52.35N, 01.54E); 3 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM137/3185)

BIRCHLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 23 February 1918, Irish Sea - Leaf-class, 5,873grt or 12,300 tons, built 1916, Shipping Controller (Lane & MacAndrew), London, armed, sailing Milford Haven for Oran in ballast. Torpedoed by U.91 (Alfred von Glassenapp) (un – then shelled) in "Irish Channel" (L/un - 20 miles W by N of the Skerries), extensively damaged, arrived Holyhead, beached and salvaged; 3 lives lost, master taken prisoner. Note: area of attack only matches voyage if she was sailing north-about Ireland for the Atlantic. Glassenapp was included on British list of war criminals for this and other attacks, case did not go to court (H/L/D/ge/ms/os/un)

BIRCHWOOD, Admiralty collier, 3 January 1918, St George's Channel - 2,756grt, built 1910, Birchwood SS Co (W & W W Constantine), Middlesbrough, armed, Mr G Bamberger, Glasgow for Devonport with coal. Torpedoed by U.61 (Victor Dieckman), sank 25 miles E of Blackwater Bank LV, off Co Wexford (un – also 10 miles SE of Enniscorthy, Wexford, wi - in 52.30N, 05.30W) (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BIRTLEY, Admiralty collier, 4 January 1918, North Sea - 1,438grt, built 1906, Burnett SS Co (Burnett & Co), Newcastle, 1-13pdr, 18 crew, Mr J Wiberg, sailed Dunkirk 1st for Tyne/Blyth in ballast, reported in Yarmouth Roads on 3rd, sailed at daylight next day, went missing, posted by Lloyds 27/1/18 “presumed by Admiralty to have been sunk by submarine 8 miles N of Flamborough Head 4 January 1918”. Confirmed as torpedoed by UB.38 (Günther Bachmann) on 4th (un – 5th or late on 4th British Time), sank 8 miles N of Flamborough Head, Yorkshire (wi - in 54.14.40N, 00.08.20W); 18 lives lost including master. Note: reported by “Wreck Index” that master and pilot of French SS Outreau saw a steamship blow up very close by at 2345 on the 4th, believed to be the Birtley (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un/wi)

BLEAMOOR, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 November 1917, English Channel - 3755grt, built 1902, Bombay & Persia Steam Navigation Co, Bombay, 1-12pdr, 69 crew, Hull for Falmouth with 5,300t coal, one passenger. Torpedoed by UB.80 (Max Viebeg) in No.1 hold at 1245, sank at 1300, 4 miles SSE of Berry Head, Devon (wi - in 50.22.43N, 03.25.14W); purser and 7 Lascars lost, survivors unable to get boats away but picked up by patrol vessels and landed at Torquay (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BLONDE, scout cruiser, 10 August 1916, Orkneys - Blonde-class, 3,850t, 10-4in/4-3pdr/2-21in tt, attached to Grand Fleet BS's, sailing in thick weather. Went ashore on Lowther Rock, Pentland Firth, lightened and towed off next day considerably damaged (Cn/gf/gr)

BLUEBELL, fleet sweeping sloop, 23 April 1916, Irish waters – during the Irish Easter Rebellion, Bluebell intercepted German auxiliary Libau, disguised as Norwegian tramp SS Aud carrying arms in support of the Irish rebellion. Aud scuttled off Queenstown

BOLDWELL, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 May 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,118grt, built 1901, London-reg, Byron SS Co (M Embiricos), armed, sailing Tyne for Alexandria with coal. Torpedoed by UC.20 (Hans Adalbert von der Lühe), sank 35 miles NE of Linosa island, off Tunisia (L - about 80 miles W of Malta; te/un - in 36.12N, 13.24E); three crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

BONA DEA, hired trawler – see MEDIATOR, hired trawler, 2 January 1916, North Sea

BOSCASTLE, Admiralty chartered collier, 7 April 1918, St George's Channel - 2,346grt, built 1912, West Hartlepool-reg, Hatfield SS, armed, Barry for Scapa Flow with coal. Torpedoed by U.111 (Hans Beyersdorff), sank 14 miles NNW of Strumble Head, Pembrokeshire (L - 12 miles NNE of); 18 crew lost including master (H/L/Lr/te/un)

BOSCAWEN, Admiralty chartered collier, 21 August 1918, St George's Channel - 1,936grt, built 1909, Cardiff-reg, Cornish Shipping, armed, Mr J Edwards, Birkenhead for Barry in ballast for orders. Torpedoed by UB.92 (Johannes Paul Muller), sank 23 miles WNW of Bardsey Isle, off Caernarvonshire (L/te/un - in 52.46N, 05.24W; wi - off Arklow Bank, in 52.46N, 05.56W); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BOTHA, destroyer – see EREBUS, monitor, 28 October 1917, Dover Straits


BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits - Allied and German Destroyer Action off Dunkirk. Expecting a raid on the Dunkirk area by the German Flanders Fotilla, [1] flotilla leader Swift, destroyers Matchless, Myngs, North Star were on patrol in the Dover Straits, [2] destroyers Botha, Morris and French Capitaine Mehl, Bouclier, Magon were ready in the Dunkirk Roads along with monitor General Crauford and a number of CMBs including CMB.20, and [3] monitors Terror, M.25 and French destroyer Oriflamme lay off the beaches of La Panne. When the enemy force was reported - five destroyers and two small A-class TB's, Terror [3] opened fire at 0355 and the Dunkirk Roads destroyers [2] got under way at 0405, CMB.20 was also ordered to head north and attack the German ships as they returned to base. Botha's division missed the German destroyers which apparently left the two small TB's behind. After 10min firing Botha was hit in No.2 stokehold and although her speed began to drop, was able to ram and cut A.19 in two. Botha was now partly hidden from her division by the German smokescreen, Capitaine Mehl fired a torpedo which hit her in the after boiler-room, bringing her to a stop. The French destroyers and possibly Morris then sank A7, and around 0500, CMB.20 attacked all five German destroyers claiming a hit on the fourth one; BOTHA, flotilla leader, Faulknor-class, 2,000t, 6-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, 6th DF Dover Patrol, Cdr R Rede. Taken in tow by Morris for Dunkirk screened by the French destroyers; 13 ratings lost (Rn/Cn/D/dd/dk/dq/dx)

BOUNTEOUS, Admiralty hired motor drifter, 4 December 1917, off W Scotland - 63grt, built 1903, Banff-reg BF1217, hired 1914 (D - 9/17), harbour tender or coastal service craft, Admiralty No.1682. Ran aground on North Shore, Rhum island, Inner Hebrides and broke up over next two days; no lives lost (H/C/D/Hedk; ADM.137/636)

BOY HAROLD, hired drifter, 3 March 1916, Adriatic Sea - 74grt, built 1911, Lowestoft-reg LT1127, hired 10/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2708, Skipper William Wood RNR, with the Durazzo evacuation over, drifters now back tending their nets between Cape Otranto and Sasseno Is. Returning to Brindisi with group of other drifters, mined, laid by UC.12 (Eberhard Fröhner) the day before, sank off Brindisi (He - 3 miles off Cape Pedagne light); Skipper and 6 ratings lost (H/L/C/D/He/ap/dk/un; ADM.137/3160, ADM.1/8449/46)

BRACKLYN, hired trawler, 11 May 1917, North Sea - 303grt, built 1914, Fleetwood-reg FD2, Brooklyn Fishing Co (T Cardwell), hired 1916 as minesweeper (D - 12/14; wi - as armed patrol vessel), Admiralty No.667, Skipper Radmore, “flagship” of Lt Arthur Rudd RNR, commanding group of Lowestoft-based minesweeping trawlers, sweeping for mines in Smith’s Knoll section starting at dark on 10th, recommenced sweeping in the morning, six trawlers in 3 pairs – Bracklyn with Yucca. Came up to buoy marking Cross Sand/Smith’s Knoll Channel and mined at 1350 under her bows, broke up and disappeared off Great Yarmouth, Norfolk (He/un - 52.42N, 02.10E; wi - in 52.35N, 01.54E), mine laid by UC.1 (Walter Warzecha) three days earlier; both officers and 8 ratings lost, 4 survivors (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/ft/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3320)

BRADFORD, hired trawler, 28 October 1916, Atlantic off S Ireland - 163grt, built 1896, Grimsby-reg GY132, Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, hired 1915 (D - 11/14) as patrol vessel, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.829, 12 crew, Skipper William Bruce RNR, believed Queenstown-based, took part in rescuing Lusitania survivors in 1915, on patrol. (dk - casualties dated lost 26th) – last seen at 1640 on the 26th, disappeared and believed foundered in gale off Old Head of Kinsale, Co Cork, presumed on the 28th (wi - in 51.30N, 08.30W); Skipper and 11 ratings lost, no survivors (H/Lr/C/D/He/ap/dk/wi; ADM.137/455)

BRIARLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 17 October 1918, Atlantic - Leaf-class, 5,822grt/12,300t, armed. Torpedo and gun attack by U-boat, torpedo exploded prematurely, ship saved by own gunfire (H/D)

BRITANNIA, Admiralty hired screw tug, 5 November 1917, English Channel – identified as Britisher, ex-Britannia, 1902, 80grt, purchased 1916. Stranded and holed at Dungeness, took 11 days to get holes stopped and her down the beach, refloated, brought to Dover by Dover salvage tugs (D/dp/gr)

BRITISH STAR [01], Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 26 March 1918, North Sea - ex-Olynthus, war construction, 6,888grt, armed, from North Shields in ballast, in convoy. Torpedoed and damaged by UB.78 (Arthur Stossberg) 1 1/2m E of Tyne, arrived Shields (H/L/D/bp/un)

BRITISH STAR [02], Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 1 September 1918, Western Atlantic - war construction, 6,976grt, armed. Chased by U-boat, escaped (H/D/bp)

BRITISH SUN, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 1 May 1917, Central Mediterranean - 5,565grt, built 1909, Liverpool-reg, British Sun Co (William Smellie), armed, sailing Abadan for Malta with 7,000t fuel oil, escorted by three armed trawlers, had to reduce speed to 6.5kts for escort to keep up. Torpedoed by UC.37 (un – UB.43 (Horst Obermüller)), oil set ablaze on water, sank 230 miles ESE of Malta (L - 232 miles E of) (H/L/Lr/ge/te/un)

BRITISH VISCOUNT, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 23 February 1918, Irish Sea - 3,287grt, built 1889, Petroleum SS Co (British Tanker Co), London-reg, armed Mr J Roberts, Liverpool for Queenstown with fuel oil. Torpedoed by U.91 (Alfred von Glassenapp), sank 12 miles NW of Skerries, near Holyhead, Anglesey (un – 12 miles N by W1/2W of; wi - in 53.30N, 04.55W); 6 crew lost (H/L/Lr/bp/te/un/wi)

BRITISHER, Admiralty hired screw tug – see BRITANNIA, Admiralty hired screw tug, 5 November 1917, English Channel

BROOMHILL, Admiralty chartered collier, 10 May 1917, English Channel - 1,392grt, built 1909, Newcastle-reg, Broomhill Collieries, 18 crew, Mr G Wright, sailing Penarth for Sheerness with 1,700t coal. Gun attack from 800yds at 0330 by UC.61 (Georg Gerth), ship went to full speed but hit by about 12 shells, stopped and boarded using one of her own boats, scuttling charges placed, went down at 0415, 9 miles SW of Portland Bill, Dorset (L - c9 miles WSW of; te/un - in 50.25N, 02.32W; wi - 50.24.23N, 02.37.15W); two crew killed and one injured during shelling, survivors allowed to abandon ship, stayed in area, picked up by patrol vessel and landed at Weymouth (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BULLDOG, destroyer, 16 April 1916, Aegean - G-class, 1,100t, 1-4in/3-12pdr/2-21in tt, was 5th DF Mediterranean Fleet, took part in Gallipoli evacuation January 1916, still believed in Mediterranean. Mined off Gallipoli, no other details; 2 officers and 5 ratings lost (Rn/D/dk)

BULLMOUTH, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 28 April 1917, Atlantic off N Ireland - 4,018grt, built 1893, London-reg, Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, armed, sailing Glasgow for Hampton Roads in ballast. Torpedoed by U.58 (Kurt Wippern), sank 125 miles NW by N of Tory Is, off Co Donegal (L/te - in 56.30N, 11.20W; un – 58.34N, 10.50W) (H/L/Lr/sl/te/un)

BULYSSES, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 20 August 1917, Atlantic off NW Scotland - 6,127grt, built 1900, Anglo-Saxon Petroleum, London, armed (sl - Admiralty oiler No.47, presumably Y7.47), Firth of Forth for Port Arthur in ballast. Torpedoed by U.52 (Hans Walther), sank 145 miles WNW of the Butt of Lewis, Outer Hebrides (L/te/un - in 58.34N, 10.50W; un – also 142 miles WNW of, also 58.35N, 11.24W) (H/L/Lr/sl/te/un)

BURNBY, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 February 1917, Western Mediterranean - 3,665grt, built 1905, West Hartlepool-reg, Sir R Ropner, armed, Barry for Algiers with coal. Torpedoed by U.39 (Walter Forstmann), sank 20 miles N of Cape Falcone (L - 14 miles NNW of Cape Falcon, Sardinia; te - off Cape Falcon); master taken prisoner. Note: Capo del Falcone is in NW Sardinia, Cape Falcon near Oran in 35.46N, 00.48W; if the Algiers destination is correct, then the more likely loss location is near Oran (H/L/Lr/te/un)

BURNLEY, hired trawler, 25 November 1916, North Sea - 275grt, built 1916, Fleetwood-reg FD242, J N Ward, hired 1915 (D - 5/16) as minesweeper, 1-12pdr, Admiralty No.3277, Lt Cdr Thomas Heap RNR, Skipper Robert Page RNR, Harwich-based, Cdr Heap “heard an explosion out at sea off Orford Ness, sent his other ships into harbour, and went to investigate”. At the time, disappeared night of 25th/26th. Mined, laid by UC.4 (Hans Howaldt; this may have been the same minefield that might have sunk E.30 on 22 November but only discovered now, although Hepper describes it here as laid the day before), went down off Orford Ness, Suffolk (wi - in 52.05.27N, 01.39.26E); Cdr Heap, Skipper Page and 17 ratings lost, no survivors (He – 18 men lost) (H/L/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8474/276)

BURNSTONE, Admiralty chartered collier, 19 March 1918, North Sea - 2,340grt, built 1903, Alexander Brothers, armed, Mr W Halcrow, from Immingham with coal. Torpedoed by UB.62 (Bernhard Putzier), sank 44 miles N of Farne Is, off Northumberland (wi - 28 miles NNE of St Abb's Head, in 56.20N, 01.50W); five crew lost (H/L/te/un/wi)

BUTETOWN (1), Admiralty collier, 8 September 1916, Central Mediterranean - 3,789grt, built 1905, Grimsby-reg, Town Line (ms – Harrison Sons & Co), armed, Malta for Mudros with coal, general cargo. Torpedoed by UB.47 (Wolfgang Steinbauer), sank 55 miles WSW of Cape Matapan (L/te - in 36N, 21.15E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

BUTETOWN (2), Admiralty chartered collier, 29 January 1918, English Channel - 1,929grt, built 1907, Town Line (London) Ltd (Harrison, Sons & Co), London, Cardiff-reg, 1-12pdr, sailing Glasgow for Portsmouth with coal. Torpedoed by UB.40 (Karl Dobberstein), sank 1 1/2m S of Dodman Point, near Falmouth, Cornwall (wi - in 50.11.38N, 04.47.40W); two crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

BUTTERCUP, sloop – see FARNBOROUGH, Q-ship, 17 February 1917, Atlantic W of Ireland

BUTTERCUP, fleet sweeping sloop, 25 December 1917, Irish Sea - Arabis-class, 1,250t, c2-4in/2-3pdr AA, and PC.56, decoy patrol boat, PC-type, 694t, 1-4in/2-12pdr, Pembroke Dockyard-based, convoy escorts. SS Agberi torpedoed by U.87 and sank at 1510, 18 miles NW?N of Bardsey Is, off W Caernarvonshire. As Buttercup circled the sinking ship, she rammed U.87, perhaps accidentally, PC.56 then dropped two depth-charges, bringing the U-boat to the surface, opened fire and finally rammed, sinking her with all hands (dx - 52.56N, 05.07W; wi - in 52.30N, 05.20W) (Cn/D/dx/ge/ub/un/wi)

BUTTERFLY [01], gunboat, 4 January 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign - First attempt to relieve British-Indian forces besieged at Kut/Kut-al-Imara/Amara, battles took place c5th-8th and 13th-21st, river gunboats Butterfly, Cranefly, Dragonfly, Gadfly took part joined by ex-Turkish motor patrol boat renamed Flycatcher (dx)

BUTTERFLY [02], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

BUTTERFLY [03], river gunboat - see MANTIS, river gunboat, 24 February 1917, Mesopotamian Front

BUTTERFLY [04], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 26 February 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

BUTTERFLY [05], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

BY GEORGE, Admiralty trawler, 7 September 1917, Aegean Sea - 225grt, built 1914, Grimsby-reg GY69, North Western Steam Fishing, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.253, Skipper Francis Joint Hulland RNR. Based at Stavros, northern Greece. Preparing to sweep field where Helgian was sunk the previous day with other minesweepers. Mined port side forward at 1710, laid by UC.23 (Volkhard von Bothmer), broke up and sank in Gulf of Ruphani, location not identified (He – in 40.38N 23.54E), but see HMS Helgian lost day before; 2 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un; ADM.137/3383)


C

C.15, submarine, June 1917, S of England - On the 23 July, the final report was received on the use of sea-lions for submarine detection which started in November 1916. Experiments included speed and sound trials at the Admiralty Anti-Submarine Division's Hawkscraig Experimental Station, Aberdour in 1/17 and trials with submarine C.15 in the Solent in June 1917 (dx)

C.15, submarine, 3 November 1917,  English Channel – C.15 sank UC.65 off Sussex (dx/un)

C.17, submarine, May 1917, probably southern British waters - C-class, c290/320t, 1908, believed 5th Flotilla, Dover Patrol. Sank in collision with I-class destroyer Lurcher 990t, Harwich Force submarine flotillas, C.17 raised and repaired (Cn/D/dp/dq/gr/ty)

C.19, submarine – see C.34, submarine, 17 July 1917, North Sea

C.32, submarine, 12 October 1917, Baltic Sea – in the Second Naval Battle for the Gulf of Riga through to 20th, German naval forces finally broke through. C.32 was lost during this period (dx)

C.34, submarine, 17 July 1917, North Sea - C-class, 290/320t, 1910, 218in tt with 4 torpedoes, c13/7.5kts, c16 crew, Pendant No.I.64, Lt Ingleby Stuart Jefferson. One of two C-boats sent on anti-U-boat patrol between Shetlands and Orkneys, especially to protect convoys approaching Lerwick. Both sailed Scapa Flow at 1900 on 16th, C.19 for Fair Isle area, C.34 for SE approaches to Lerwick. Next day at 1335, C.34 was trimmed down on the surface off the Shetlands possibly stopped - sources vary. Sighted by submerged U-boat which spent some time manoeuvering into firing position. (some sources 21st) - Hit amidships by one torpedo from U.52 (Hans Walther) at 1446 and blew up (He – in 59.51N, 01.05W; bw - in 59.30N, 00.05W; go - E of Fair Isle; ke - between Orkneys and Shetlands in 59.30N, 00.05E; C/D - off N Ireland; dx - mine laid by UC.74 off Shetlands); 3 officers, 15 ratings lost (ke - 15 casualties), only survivor Stoker Frank Scoble was picked up by U.52 from among the wreckage (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/ge/go/ke/on/un; ADM.137/3709)

CALEDON, light cruiser – see ACTION OFF HELIGOLAND BIGHT, 17 November 1917

CALIFOL, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 30 September 1916, Atlantic N of Scotland - later renamed Roseleaf, Leaf-class, 6,572grt/12,300t, war construction, armed. Chased by U-boat W of Shetlands, rescued (second attack as Roseleaf on 27/4/17) (H/D/Mn)

CALISTOGA, hired drifter, 13 May 1916, Adriatic - Austro-Hungarian submarine U.VI caught in nets in Strait of Otranto by drifters Calistoga, Dulcie Dorry, Evening Star and scuttled (dx)

CALLIOPE, light cruiser, 19 March 1916, North Sea - Calliope-class, 4,695t, flagship 4th LCS Grand Fleet, sailed with two destroyers from Tyne after refitting for sweep up Norwegian coast to Utsire. Serious fire in after boiler room fire, forced to return to Rosyth, repaired in time for Jutland (Cn/D/gf/gr)

CALLIOPE, Admiralty chartered collier, 12 July 1917, Atlantic off Gibraltar - 2,883grt, built 1900, Calliope SS Co, London, armed, sailed Seville 9th for Newport with pyrites, went missing, posted by Lloyds 5/12/17, “presumed by Admiralty to have been sunk by submarine” possibly on 14th, Lloyds amended in 1937. Confirmed as torpedoed and sunk by U.155 (Karl Meusel) on 12th (L - in c35N, 17W; un – about 150 miles N of Madeira); 27 lives lost including master (H/L/Lr/ge/te/un)

CALLIOPE II, hired trawler, 5 March 1916, off NW Scotland - 240grt, built 1907, Milford-reg M214, D Pettit, hired 8/14, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.367, Skipper J Foreman. In service as minesweeper, in collision with Norwegian steamer Dane, sank at 0030 off Butt of Lewis, N tip of Lewis (He - 10 miles north of Butt of Lewis; wi - in 58.31N, 05.45W); one rating drowned (H/Lr/C/D/dk/wi; ADM.137/217)

CALVIA, hired trawler,19 November 1917, possibly North Sea - minesweeper/hydrophone vessel suffered gun explosion, two ratings killed, one buried at Cleethorpes (D/dk)

CALYPSO, light cruiser – see ACTION OFF HELIGOLAND BIGHT, 17 November 1917


CAMBRIDGE, paddle minesweeper – see FAIR MAID, paddle minesweeper, 9 November 1916, North Sea

CAMPANULA, sloop, 18 January 1918, Mediterranean - UB.66 sunk by Campanula in central Mediterranean off Tunisia (dx)

CANDYTUFT, convoy sloop, 8 November 1917, Atlantic off SW Portugal - Anchusa-class, 1,290t, 2-4in/2-12pdr, sailed Devonport early November, escorting convoy to Gibraltar, operating as Q-ship disguised as a tramp. Gun attack by U.63 (Otto Schultze) off Cape St Vincent (un - in 35.24N, 08.18W), bridge wrecked but fired three shots in reply without any hits; no lives lost. Repaired damage at Gibraltar by 16th. Sunk on 18th (Cn/D/ge/sk/un)

CANGANIAN, Admiralty collier, 17 November 1916, North Sea - 1,142grt, built 1900, Cardiff-reg, Canganian SS, Mr H Roberts. sailed Methil on 17th for Scapa Flow with coal, went missing, “not since heard of”, posted by Lloyds 27/12/16. Confirmed as mined, laid by UC.29 (Ernst Rosenow), sank SE of Montrose (wi - off Arbroath, position unknown, but c56.30N, 02W, also recorded as foundered 810 miles off Montrose in 56.35.24N; 02.21.30W); 18 crew lost including master (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

CAPE COLONY, hired drifter, 8 January 1917, North Sea - 82grt, built 1908, Fraserburgh-reg FR525, hired 1916 (D - 3/15) as net drifter, 16pdr AA, Admiralty No.2497, at anchor off Harwich, watching her anti-submarine nets, weather bad, heavy sea running. Dragged anchor overnight, weighed at dawn and mate spotted German mine jammed between the anchor's fluke and shank, capstan stopped but drifter pitched and mine went up blowing the drifter into “matchwood” off Harwich, Essex (wi - in 51.54N, 01.20E); no lives lost, crew in water for some time but picked up by hired naval drifters Citron and Enterprise. Mine laid by UC.11 (Benno von Ditfurth) (+L/C/D/He/ap/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/525)

CARADOC, light cruiser, 15 August 1917, North Sea - Caledon-class, 4,950t, 6th LCS Grand Fleet; stranded on Fair Isle, extensively damaged (Cn/D/gr)

CARBINEER, Admiralty trawler, 18 May 1916, Atlantic off SW England - Military-class, purchased on stocks 11/12/14, one of ten bought for total cost of £93,800, 276grt, launched 15/2/15, 1-12pdr bow mounted deck gun (D - minesweeper, 1-3pdr; wi - auxiliary trawler), Admiralty No.1164, based at St. Mary's, on patrol duties. Wrecked on Crebawethan Point, SW Scillies in poor weather; no lives lost. Note: in the “Wreck Index” account, she ran onto the Crim Rocks, just north of Bishop Rock and presumably started to take in water, a crew member from the Scillies advised running her ashore, reached Crebawethan Point - just east of the Bishops - also identified as Western Rocks, in 49.52.43N, 06.25W, stranded and became a total loss (He - badly damaged) (H/C/Cn/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/235)

CARDIFF [01], light cruiser – see ACTION OFF HELIGOLAND BIGHT, 17 November 1917

CARDIFF [02], light cruiser, 21 November 1918, End of the Imperial Navy - German High Sea Fleet with two battle squadrons of 9 dreadnoughts, 5 battlecruisers, 7 light cruisers, 49 destroyers surrendered off May Is off the Firth of Forth to around 250 mainly British warships in Operation ZZ, arrived at Rosyth before internment at Scapa Flow. They were led in by light cruiser Cardiff. Two more German dreadnoughts, 1 light cruiser, 1 destroyer arrived later (dx)

CARNARVON, cruiser, February 1916, central Atlantic - Devonshire-class, 10,850t, North America and West Indies Station. February - Hit shoal near Abrolhos Rocks off E Brazil, tore bottom plating. Repaired at Rio de Janeiro, continued on Station until 11/18 (Cn/D/gr)

CARNATION, fleet sweeping sloop, 31 March 1917, Orkneys - 1,210t, 1915. Mined, laid by UC.42 (Otto Heinrich Tornow) at southern exit from Stronsay Firth in 58.59'N, 2.31'W, damaged; five crew, four of them stokers, killed (un - no casualties). An account in "Swept Channels" refers to "Carnation with Grand Fleet flotillas, flotilla slipped sweeps, steaming in single line led by senior ship Gentian, Carnation number six or seven, conditions foggy. Date not given, but probably 1917, before August - Mine sighted and "mine close by" signal sent, visibility low and Carnation struck, towed into Kirkwall, out of action for some time; believed one man killed". This may be the same incident (D/dk/sc/un)

CARRIGAN HEAD, commissioned escort ship, 29 November 1917, English Channel - 4,201grt, cargo ship owned by Ulster SS, hired as squadron supply ship 8/14-4/16, Q-ship c6/16-8/17, commissioned escort ship from 8/17, 2-6in/2-4in. U-boat attack, torpedo missed (H/C/D/qs)

CARYSFORT, light cruiser, 13 December 1917, North Sea - Caroline-class, 4,730t, 5th LCS Harwich Force. In collision with collier SS Glentaise 1,001grt, 6 miles E of Orford Ness (gr - SS Glentaise damaged; wi - foundered, in 52.06N 01.43.45E), 2 men lost in the steamship (Cn/gr/wi)

CASTLE EDEN, Admiralty chartered collier, 4 March 1918, Atlantic off N Ireland - 1,949grt, built 1914, Furness, Withy & Co, West Hartlepool-reg, armed, Mr J Griffiths, Greenock/Clyde for Lough Swilly with general cargo, 1,920t Welsh coal. (L/wi - 3rd) - Sunk by U.110 (Karl Kroll), 4 miles SSE of Inishtrahull LH (wi - off Lough Foyle, Co Derry, in 55.19.30N, 07.03.30W, also quotes 07.35.27W); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

CATTISTOCK, fleet minesweeper, around 7 September 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - Hunt-class, 750t, c2-12pdr/2-6pdr, probably 2nd or 3rd minesweeper Flotilla, Granton. End of first week of September - In action with U-boat off Fastnet Rock, fired about 20 shots to her 12, greatly outranged, trawl-winch hit; no casualties (Cn/D/ap)

CHALLENGER [01], light cruiser – see CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 18 February 1916, West African Campaign

CHALLENGER [02], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign

CHANCE, hired drifter, 26 January 1916, Orkneys - 92grt, built 1908, Wick-reg WK270, hired 8/14 (D - 12/15) as tender for Fleet duties. In collision, sank off Orkneys; no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk)

CHANGUINOLA [01], armed merchant cruiser, 20 July 1917, North Atlantic area - 5,978grt, built 1912, hired 21/11/14, 10th CS, sailing for Loch Ewe. U-boat attacked, narrowly missed by torpedo(es) (Mn/D)

CHANGUINOLA [02], armed merchant cruiser, 19 August 1917, Atlantic N of Ireland - 5,978grt, built 1912, hired 21/11/14, 10th CS, armed merchant cruisers leaving or returning to their bases were now joining convoys for protection. Changuinola's convoy dispersed almost immediately after leaving Lough Swilly because of submarine attack, narrowly missed by torpedo (Mn/D)

CHARLES GOODANEW, Admiralty store carrier, 17 April 1917, North Sea - 791grt, built 1911, Plymouth-reg, Plymouth Mutual Co-Operative Industrial Society, hired 29/1/17 as RFA, Pendant No.Y8.71, believed 14 crew, carrying a naval rating as passenger, Aberdeen for Scapa Flow with Admiralty cargo/government stores. Mined at 0500, laid by UC.45 (Hubert Aust), sank at once 3 1/2m ENE of Rattray Head near Fraserburgh (wi - in 57.38.30N, 01.44W; te - in 57.39N, 01.45W); 13 lives lost including master, 2nd engineer and fireman were in water for an hour before being picked up by naval drifter (H/L/Lr/Cn/D/te/un/wi)

CHARLESTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 12 December 1917, St George's Channel - 1,866grt, built 1908,, Withy & Co, West Hartlepool-reg, Furness armed, Mr C Anderson, Berehaven for Cardiff in ballast (te/un/wi - Cardiff for Berehaven with coal). (L/wi - 11th) - Captured by UB.65 (Martin Schelle), sunk by bombs 30 miles W of The Smalls, E of Milford Haven (un – in 51.37E, 05.59W; wi - in 51.40N, 06.28W), two gunners taken prisoner (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

CHARON, whaler – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign

CHATHAM, light cruiser, 26 May 1916, North Sea - Chatham-class, 5,400t, 8-6in/4-3pdr/2-21in tt, due to join 3rd LCS, Grand Fleet. Mined off Norfolk, towed stern-first to Chatham for repairs; two boys died on this day, presumably in this incident. Under repair and missed Jutland (Cn/D/dk/ja)

CHERRYLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 25 August 1917, English Channel - Leaf-class, 5,896grt/12,300t, armed. U-boat attack, torpedo missed (H/D)

CHERTSEY [01], Admiralty chartered collier, 26 April 1917, Western Mediterranean - 3,264grt, built 1898, London-reg, Britain SS Co (Watts, Watts & Co), armed, sailing Tyne for Alexandria/Port Said with coal. (L - 25th) - Torpedoed by UC.67 (Karl Neumann), sank 4 miles N of Algiers (L - 3 miles N true of; un – 36.52N, 03.05W) (Chertsey 3,264grt attacked 1 February 1918 - if the same vessel, damaged after her loss according to HMSO) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

CHERTSEY [02], possibly Admiralty chartered collier, 1 February 1918, English Channel - 3,264grt, armed. U-boat attack, torpedo missed (Note: collier Chertsey also 3,264grt was on Admiralty service when sunk 26 April 1917 - if these were the same vessels, the attack took place after the sinking according to HMSO. They are indexed as one and the same)

CHESTER II, hired trawler, 29 February 1916, North Sea - 143grt, built 1896, Grimsby-reg GY148, Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, hired 1915 (D - 10/14) as minesweeper (wi - armed trawler), 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.629, Skipper R Dutton. In collision with torpedo boat TB.28 at 0340, both ships darkened, sank in Firth of Forth (He - in Gullane Bay; wi - 1 1/2m off Gullane Bay, Aberlady, Cockenzie, in 56.04.16N, 02.52.15W, also 2.98m, 267.5º from Fidra Light); no lives lost. Wreck lies at 56ft, divers can enter the wheelhouse and interior (H/Lr/C/D/dk/wi; ADM.137/216; ADM.53/64514)

CHILDERS, whaler – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign

CHRISTOPHER, destroyer – see PRIVET, Q-ship, 12 March 1917, English Channel

CICALA, river gunboat, 6 August 1919, North Russia - Insect-class, 645t, 10/12/15, 2-6in/2-12pdr, North Russian Expeditionary Force. Probably 6 August - Bolshevik forces released mines into Dvina River, off Selso, leadsmen accidentally hit one which exploded, out of action for several weeks, repaired at Archangel; casualties not known. Note: “In action May 7th, mined off Selso by Bolsheviks, afterwards raised and in action again on August 16th, 1919.” (gb/gs)

CILICIA, Admiralty chartered collier, 12 February 1917, South Atlantic - 3,750grt, built 1907, Whitby-reg, International Line SS, Cardiff for Simon's Bay with coal, general cargo. Mined, laid by raider Wolf on or around 17 January 1917, sank 5 miles S of Dassen Is, Cape of Good Hope (H/L/Lr/Mn/Cn/kp)

CITRON, hired drifter – see CAPE COLONY, hired drifter, 8 January 1917, North Sea

CITY OF BELFAST, armed boarding steamer, 15 October 1917, Western Mediterranean - Midland Railway Co, Barrow. Gun attack by U.35 (Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière) off Punta Sabinal in 36.39N, 02.11W, damaged; 3 crew killed, all buried in Gibraltar (dk/un only)

CITY OF OXFORD, kite balloon ship - see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign

CLACH-NA-CUDIN, hired drifter, 25 April 1916, Adriatic - 78grt, built 1908, Buckie-reg, hired 4/15 as net drifter. Mined and damaged off Brindisi, remained in service; 6 ratings lost, all buried at Bari. Returned to owner 1920 (D/dk)

CLACTON, auxiliary screw minesweeper, 3 August 1916, Eastern Mediterranean - ex-railway packet, 820grt, built 1904, Harwich-reg, Great Eastern Railway, hired 7/10/14, 2-12pdr, Pendant No.T.04 from 9/15, Commander William Coates RNR. Supporting British forces in Macedonia, returning to Chai Aghizi (modern Kevala Bay) with stores, at 0830, preparing to come alongside cruiser Grafton, torpedo track spotted but unable to avoid. Torpedoed by U.73 (Gustav Siess) (Colledge’s Supplement lists the U-boat as U.38; Hepper confirms U.73), settled by head, attempt made to beach her, foundered after five minutes. Loss positions include: at Chai Aghizi; off Kavalla Bay; off the Levant; and in c40.46N, 23.53E. Kavalla and the latitude/longitude are off NE Greece, Chai Aghizi has not been located but the name appears to be of Greek origin. Uboat.net and Hepper confirm Kavalla/Kevala Bay, Aegean Sea; 2 officers, 3 ratings lost (H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/te; ADM.137/3625)

CLAM, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 5 April 1918, Irish Sea - 3,552grt, built 1893, armed, (sl - Admiralty oiler No.58, presumably Y7.58), Liverpool for Queenstown with fuel oil. Torpedoed and damaged by UB.64 (Otto von Schrader) in "Irish Channel" (L/un - in 53.25N, 04.57W), arrived Liverpool; no lives lost (H/L/sl/un)

CLAN FERGUSON, Admiralty chartered collier, 7 September 1917, Atlantic off NW Morocco - 4,808grt, built 1898, Clan Line Steamers, Glasgow, armed, sailing Glasgow for Alexandria/Bombay with coal and general cargo. (H/L - 6th) - torpedoed by UB.49 (Hans von Mellenthin), sank 15 miles NW of Cape Spartel (L/te/un - in 35.50N, 06.10W); ten crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

CLAN FORBES, Admiralty chartered collier, 9 June 1918, Eastern Mediterranean - 3,946grt, built 1903, Glasgow-reg, Clan Line, armed, Newport for Port Said with coal. Torpedoed by UB.105 (Wilhelm Marschall), sank 115 miles WNW of Alexandria (L/te/un - in 31.55N, 27.50E); two crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

CLAN McLACHLAN, Admiralty chartered collier, 19 July 1917, near Gibraltar - 4,729grt, built 1900, Glasgow-reg, Clan Line. Sunk in collision, no other details (H/Lr)

CLARA, Admiralty chartered collier, 28 December 1917, English Channel - 2,425grt, built 1898, Burdick & Cook, London, 1-13pdr, 24 crew, Mr E Simons, Rouen for Barry Roads in ballast. Torpedoed by UB.57 (Otto Steinbrinck) in No.4 hold at 2230, ship abandoned at 2250, three shots heard fired by the U-boat before she sank at 2330, 1 1/2m SSW of the Runnelstone/Runnel Stone Buoy, off Lands End (L - 2 1/2m ESE of; wi - in 50.11.00N, 05.36.30W; un – 1.5 miles S of); survivors picked up next day at 1000 and landed at Penzance (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

CLEARFIELD, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 24 October 1916, Atlantic off NW Scotland - 4,229grt, built 1909, Newcastle-reg, Hunting SS, sailed Invergordon 21st for Hampton Roads in ballast, passed Cape Wrath on 23rd, went missing, posted by Lloyds 28/2/17, later addition to Lloyds “claimed sunk by U.55 on Oct 24 west of the Hebrides”. Probably torpedoed by U.55 (Wilhelm Werner), sank off the Flannan Is, off NW Outer Hebrides; 36 crew lost including master. Werner was on original British list of war criminals for sinking SS Clearfield without warning although the case did not go to court (H/L/Lr/ge/os/te/un)

CLEON, hired trawler, 1 February 1918, Dover Straits - 266grt, built 1907, Grimsby-reg GY240, Orient Steam Fishing, hired 5/15 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr or 3pdr, Admiralty No.1514, Dover Patrol, Skipper Peter Sinclair RNR. On patrol between Folkestone Gate buoy and NE Varne buoy, and disappeared. Explosion heard at 2100, damaged boat found nearby, believed mined and foundered off Folkestone Gate Buoy, off Kent (wi - in 51.02.09N, 01.10.12E); 1 officer, 11 ratings lost, no survivors (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/wi; ADM.1/8514/49)

CLEOPATRA [01], light cruiser – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

CLEOPATRA [02], light cruiser, 4 August 1916, North Sea - Caroline-class, 4,730t, 2-6in/8-4in/1-13pdr AA/4-21in tt, 5th LCS and flagship Harwich Force, one of two light cruisers and eight destroyers apparently detached to reinforce Dover Patrol. Mined off Thornton Ridge, off Dutch coast, reached the Nore and repaired; 4 ratings killed (Cn/D/gf/ty)

CLIFTON, hired trawler, 18 February 1917, Atlantic off S Ireland - 242grt, built 1906, Grimsby-reg GY116, T C & F Moss, hired 1915 (D - 12/14; wi - as patrol minesweeper), 1-12pdr, Admiralty No.954, Lt James Clemens RNR in command, Skipper Edward Garrod RNR. Used as a patrol vessel. Mined at 0645, laid by UC.33 (Martin Schelle) some days before, sank off Daunt Rock LV, off Roches Point, Cork Harbour Estuary (wi - in 51.43N, 08.15.30W); Skipper, 12 ratings lost (He – 13 ratings, Lt Clemens was the only survivor) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/360)

CLIFTONDALE, Admiralty chartered collier, 24 December 1917, Western Mediterranean - 3,811/1901, Nella SS Co, Bristol, armed, Cardiff/Oran for Algiers with coal and general cargo. Torpedoed by U.35 (Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière), sank 36 miles E by N1/2N of Cape Tenez, W Algeria; three crew lost, master taken prisoner (+L/Lr/dk/te/un)

CLIFTONIAN, Admiralty chartered collier, 6 February 1917, Atlantic off S Ireland - 4303grt, built 1911, London-reg, Cambrian Steam Navigation, 1-12pdr, 34 crew, Mr Owen, Cardiff for Marseilles with 6,000t coal/coke. Torpedoed by U.85 (Willy Petz) (wi - U.72) at 1100, immediately abandoned by most of crew but master, chief engineer, 2nd officer stayed on board to try to beach her, sank 4 1/2m S3/4E of Galley Head, Co Cork (L - 4 1/2m, S 8 degrees E of; te/wi - in 51.28N, 08.55W); survivors picked up by patrol vessels and landed at Queenstown (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

CLOVER BANK, hired drifter – see BELGIUM COAST OPERATIONS, 24 April 1916, North Sea

CLYDE, hired trawler, 14 October 1917, English Channel - 146grt, built 1891 or 1898, Grimsby-reg G317, T C & F Moss, hired 2/15 as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.971. In collision with armed trawler Flintshire at 0420 (gr - in November, with armed boarding steamer Rowan 1,493grt), sank off Sidmouth, Devon; no lives lost (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/gr/wi; ADM.137/556)

CMB ATTACK ON KRONSTADT NAVAL BASE, FIRST; CMB.4, coastal motor boat, 16 June 1919, Baltic Sea - 40ft-type, built Thornycroft, Hampton, Admiralty Motor Boat No.784, Lt A Agar plus two crew, heavily-fortified Bolshevik base of Kronstadt included dreadnought Petropavlovsk and battleship Andrei Pervozvanny, no British ships larger than light cruisers to contain them so CMB attack attempted. (vc/www - night of 16th/17th; dx - night of 17th) - CMB.4 penetrated the base, torpedoed and sank cruiser Oleg 6,645t (Cn - on 17th), boat damaged before and after the sinking by heavy gunfire; no casualties, Lt Augustine Willington Shelton Agar awarded the Victoria Cross. CMB.4 is still in existence in Britain at the Imperial War Museum site at Duxford (Cn/D/dx/gb/vc)

CMB.1, coastal motor boat, 19 June 1917, Belgian Coast - 40ft-type, Thornycroft, Hampton 1916, Adty MB No.781, Dover Patrol, commanded by Lieutenant RNR. That morning a Dunkirk-based Short 184 seaplane, with two escorting Sopwith Baby seaplanes, took off to carry out a reconnaissance of the Belgian coast. Ten miles NE of Nieuport they were attacked by three German seaplanes. One German and the two Sopwith's came down. A French destroyer and CMB's 1 and 9 sailed to rescue the pilots. Four German torpedo boats of the Flanders flotillas arrived on the scene first. CMB.9 escaped, but CMB.1 took a direct hit, and blew up off Ostend; 1 rating on CMB.1 lost, possibly DOW next day (dk – killed on the 20th; dp - crew taken prisoner; ke - no lives lost, 4 survivors). Note: thereafter, air-sea rescue missions were abandoned if Allied aircraft crashed too close to the enemy coast (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dp/dx/ke; ADM.137/462)

CMB.4 – see CMB.9, coastal motor boat, 7 April 1917, North Sea

CMB.5 – see CMB.9, coastal motor boat, 7 April 1917, North Sea

CMB.6 – see CMB.9, coastal motor boat, 7 April 1917, North Sea

CMB.8, coastal motor boat, 27 September 1917, North Sea - 40ft-type, Thornycroft, Hampton 1916, Adty MB No.788, Dover Patrol, Lieutenant Robert Angus. On night of 25th/26th, minefield laid in southern North Sea as Operation W.11, covered by a number of ships including seaplane carrier Vindex. Two of her aircraft did not return and were assumed to have made for Holland. On the afternoon of the 27th, CMB.8 and 13 sailed from Dunkirk to search for them along the Belgian coast. CMB.8's steering gear broke down around 1800, temporary repairs were unsuccessful, and the search was called off. CMB.13 took No.8 in tow, but they had been spotted from the shore, came under distant fire, and smoke was spotted over the horizon. At 1840, CMB.13's engine misfired and stopped, and No.8 overran the towline, entangling her propeller. She too stopped, but No.13 got underway again. By this time the shore fire was getting more accurate and approaching destroyers were spotted. CMB.13 took on board No.8's crew, demolition charges were fired to sink her (in around 51.15N, 02.35E), and CMB.13 returned safely with both crews; no lives lost (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dq/ke; ADM.137/2084, ADM.137/2273)

CMB.9 [01], coastal motor boat, 7 April 1917, North Sea - attack by CMB's 4, 5, 6, 9 on German destroyers off Zeebrugge, CMB.9 torpedoed and sank G.88, the first success by coastal forces (dx)

CMB.9 [02], coastal motor boat – see CMB.1, coastal motor boat, 19 June 1917, Belgian Coast

CMB.11, coastal motor boat, 2 November 1917, Dover Straits - 40ft-type, built Tom Bunn, Rotherhithe 1916, Adty MB No.791. In collision off Dover, caught fire, burnt out and sank; no lives lost (H/J/C/Cn/D/dk/ke; ADM.137/574)

CMB.13, coastal motor boat – see CMB.8, coastal motor boat, 27 September 1917, North Sea

CMB.20, coastal motor boat – see BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits

CMB.67A, coastal motor boat, 31 July 1919, North Sea – one of 8 CMB's being towed to the Baltic by ships of the 20th DF, sailing from Harwich on 25 July, seas choppy, winds gusting, and tows parted a number of times. Venturous was towing CMB.67A, tow broke three times and reconnected, but at the fourth time, at 2230, she foundered before the line could be reconnected. At the time heading for shelter in Albaek Bay, Denmark, went down NE of Skagen lighthouse. Note: according to Dittmar and Conway's, CMB.67A was lost 18.8.19 in attack on Bolshevik fleet, Kronstadt. (C/D/He; ADM.53/67146)

COADJUTOR, hired trawler – see  LOCH ARD, hired trawler, 10 September 1917, North Sea

COCHRANE, cruiser – see GLORY, battleship, 7 March 1918, Russian Intervention

COLLEGIAN, Admiralty chartered collier, 20 October 1917, Eastern Mediterranean - 7,520grt, built 1899, Charente SS Co, Liverpool, armed, Liverpool for Calcutta with coal, general cargo. Torpedoed by UB.48 (Wolfgang Steinbauer), sank 100 miles NW by N1/4N from Alexandria, Egypt (L/te/un - in 32.35N, 28.41E) (H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un)

COLOMBELLA, armed merchant cruiser, 15 February 1917, North Atlantic - 8,292grt, built 1902, hired 20/11/14. Collided with and sank SS Fife 3,912grt in 60.00N, 09.00W (D/gr/ms)

COLUMBA, hired trawler, 10 March 1918, North Sea - 138grt, built 1893, T L Devlin, Granton-reg GN43, hired 1914 (D - 5/16) as boom defence vessel, 1-3pdr, under tow from Dundee to Rosyth for gate vessel duties. Mined at 1412, laid by UC.40 (Hermann Menzel), sank off May Is, entrance to Firth of Forth (He – about 1 mile SSW of Isle of May, wreck located in 56.09.30N 02.33.30W; wi - 1 1/2m SSW of S point of Isle of May, in 56.09.30N, 02.33.30W); 1 rating and 4 MMR lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/un/wi; ADM137/734)

COMET, destroyer - see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign


COMMANDANT, hired trawler, 2 April 1916, North Sea - 207grt, (Lr - blt 1914; D/wi - 1915; C - 1905), Granton-reg GN36, T L Devlin, hired 4/15 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.1440, Skipper Charles Cornelius RNR, believed Harwich-based. Sweeping near South Sunk LV with trawler Regal, one mine brought to surface and destroyed. Mined at 0810, laid by UC.7 (Georg Haag) the previous day, sank quickly stern first, off Sunk Sand LV, off Harwich (wi - in 51.52.10N, 01.35.35E); 5 ratings lost. Note: not listed in Lloyds Register 1912/13, suggesting year of build was later, around 1914/15 (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3141)

CONQUEST [01], light cruiser, 28 March 1916, E England - Caroline-class, 7,730t, 5th LCS Harwich Force. Ship's boat, a whaler, returning from shore leave, lost in snow storm, all 39 ratings on board drowned, five buried ashore (Cn/D/dk)

CONQUEST [02], light cruiser – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

CONWAY CASTLE, hired trawler – see RUBY (2), hired trawler, 17 October 1917, Atlantic off NW France

CORINTH, Admiralty collier, 13 November 1916, North Sea - 3,669grt, built 1904, Liverpool-reg, Corinthian Shipping (un – Page Shipping Co), 26 crew, Mr J Reed, Blyth for Rochefort with coal. (wi - 12th) - UB.39 (Heinrich Kustner) surfaced close alongside and Corinth headed for land under fire, hit a number of times and engines stopped although firing continued, crew abandoned ship, then boarded using one of her boats and “pillaged”, bombs hung over the side, sank 28 miles S3/4E of Flamborough Head, Yorkshire (L - 30 miles S3/4E of; te - in about 53.43N, 00.14E; wi - in 53.44.41N, 00.16.02E); crew picked up by Royal Navy destroyer and landed at Grimsby (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

CORONA, hired trawler, 23 March 1916, Dover Straits - 212grt, built 1912, Grimsby-reg GY684, Grimsby & North Sea SS Trawling, hired 2/15, 1-6pdr/1-2pdr, Admiralty No 1137, Lt James Irvine RNR, Skipper Frank Thornton, Dover Patrol, with local Ramsgate armed defence flotilla. Mined at 0630 in field laid by UC.6 (Matthias Graf von Schmettow), sank near Ramsgate, Kent (He – in 51.08N 01.25E; wi - 51.20N 01.30E), both officers and 11 ratings lost. Later raised, returned to service, listed until 1919 (H/L/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.1/8452/67b)

COSSACK, destroyer, 1 July 1917, English Channel - F-class, 882t, 6th DF Dover Patrol. In collision with SS The Duchess 553grt, 3 miles E by N of the Royal Sovereign LS (wi - in 50.43.50N, 00.30.25E), Cossack's depth charges exploded, stern blown off to water, towed into Dover; no lives lost (Cn/dk/dq/gr/wi)

COTSMUIR, hired trawler, 2 February 1917, North Sea - 242grt, built 1915, Milford-reg M15, D Pettit, hired 6/15 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.1537, Skipper James Butler RNR, based on Humberside. After escorting steamer to the Tyne, on passage back to the Humber. Disappeared night of 2nd/3rd, cause unknown, presumed mined; Skipper and 12 ratings lost (+Lr/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/943)

COURTIER, hired trawler, 6 January 1916, North Sea - 181grt, built 1910, Grimsby-reg GY564, Queen Steam Fishing, hired 1914 (D - 1/15; He – as a minesweeper), Admiralty No.449, Skipper Samuel Blissett RNR. Mined at 8.50pm, broke up and sank rapidly off Kilnsea, close to Spurn Head, Yorkshire; Skipper, 10 ratings lost, a trawler commanded by Lt Crossley RNR steamed into the minefield and rescued some of the crew, awarded a DSC (He – one man rescued alive but DOW four days later) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc; ADM.1/8444/2)

COWRIE, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 4 July 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 4,893grt, armed (sl - Admiralty oiler No.65, presumably Y7.65). Attacked by U.53 (Hans Rose), torpedo missed (H/sl/un)

CRAIGENDORAN, Admiralty chartered collier, 3 March 1917, Western Mediterranean - 2,789grt, built 1899, Glasgow-reg, SS Craigendoran, armed, Barry for Malta with coal. Torpedoed by UC.37 (Otto Launburg), sank 6 miles E of Cape Sigli, near Bougie/Bejaia, E of Algiers; three crew lost, master, chief engineer taken prisoner (H/L/Lr/te/un)

CRANEFLY [01], river gunboat – see BUTTERFLY, gunboat, 4 January 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

CRANEFLY [02], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

CRATHIE, hired trawler, 16 December 1916, off NW Scotland - (C - Craithie), 225grt, built 1916, Aberdeen-reg A713, Caledonian Steam Trawling, hired 11/16 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.2980, based at Larne. Sweeping off southern islands of Outer Hebrides. Went ashore, holed in port side, and lost on Nizam Point, Barra Head, Outer Hebrides (wi - in 57.03N, 07.27.30W). Ship sank before she could be salvaged, divers recovered gun and some stores; no lives lost (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/570)

CRENELLA [01], Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 26 November 1917, Atlantic SW of Ireland - ex-dummy battleship No.8 “Audacious”, ex-passenger ship Montcalm, 7,035grt, built 1897, now Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London, armed, sailing Queenstown for America, no cargo, in ballast. Torpedoed by U.101 (Karl Koopmann), 146 miles W of Queenstown (un – in 49.47N, 10.58W), damaged, put back to port on 27th (H/L/Lr/C/D/ed/sl/un)

CRENELLA [02], Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 1 August 1918, Atlantic SW of Ireland - ex-dummy battleship No.8 “Audacious”, ex-passenger ship Montcalm, 7,035grt, now London-reg, Anglo-Saxon Petroleum, armed. Torpedo missed (H/Lr/C/D)

CRICKET, river gunboat, 1919, North Russia - Insect-class, 645t, 16/12/15, 2-6in/2-12pdr, on River Dvina. 1919 - Hit by gunfire in bows below waterline, started flooding and forward bulkhead collapsed, ran heavily aground and remained fast for four weeks, patched up and towed to Archangel (gb/gs)

CROCUS, sloop – see PARGUST, Q-ship, 7 June 1917, Atlantic

CROWNSIN, Admiralty trawler, 4 May 1916, Central Mediterranean - ex-German Varel, 137grt, built 1895, prize captured 7/10/15 in North Sea by light cruiser Arethusa, possibly sent to Grimsby, added to Navy list same month, Admiralty No.1950, commissioned as Crownsit, changed to Crownsin from 8/11/15, listed as PT - prize trawler - in Navy Lists, assigned to Mediterranean service as patrol vessel (He – minesweeper), Skipper William Knowles RNR. Mined at 2300, laid by U.73 (Gustav Siess) around 25 April, sank near Malta; 11 ratings lost, Skipper was the only survivor (H/C/D/He/dk/ge; ADM.1/8456/104)

CUMBERLAND, cruiser, 18 February 1916, West African Campaign - Surrender of last German forces at Mora in Cameroons, armoured cruiser Cumberland, protected cruiser Challenger took part (dx)

CUPAR, twin screw minesweeper, 5 May 1919, North Sea - Aberdare-class, 800t, 27/3/18, 1-4in QF/1-12pdr AA, 16kts, 74 crew, P/No.T.86, was Grimsby-based 7th Fast Minesweeping Flotilla, now back in Grimsby clearing British east coast minefield, Lieutenant Ernest Robert Maycock. Sailed from Alnmouth Bay morning of the 5th with four other minesweepers, just started sweeping. Mined at 0845, engines and steering out of action, taking in water. After removal of some of the crew, taken in tow by Sherborne for Tyne but she slowly settled, abandoned at 1115, foundered stern first five minutes later (He – in 55.17N 00.44W; wi - in 55.01N, 01.22.45W); 1 rating lost on 17th, perhaps DOW (sc - several crew killed by explosion) (J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ge/sc; ADM.1/8560/152)

CYCLAMEN [01], fleet sweeping sloop, 10 March 1917, NW Mediterranean - Arabis-class, 1,250t, escorting convoy including troopship. Not informed Italian submarine Guglielmotti 710/870t was in the area, took her for a U-boat, rammed and sank her NW of Capraia Island, off NE Corsica (Cn/gr/md)

CYCLAMEN [02], sloop, 9 January 1918, Mediterranean - UB.69 sunk by Cyclamen in central Mediterranean off Tunisia (dx)

CYDONIA, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 September 1917, North Sea - 3,085grt, built 1910, North Shields-reg, Stag Line, 29 crew, Mr W Gill, Methil/Burntisland for Brest with coal. (wi - 28th) - listed as wrecked on passage with no further details. “Wreck Index” places her loss on Castle Rocks, Holy Is off Bamburgh, Northumberland in 55.41.30N, 01.47.15W (H/Lr/wi)


D


D.7, submarine, 12 September 1917, Atlantic W of Shetlands – sank U.45 (dx)

DAFFODIL, fleet sweeping sloop, 15 December 1916, believed southern Ireland – serving with 1st Sloop flotilla, Queenstown. Damaged in collision, one man DOI next day (dk/pl)

DAGON, hired trawler, 8 December 1916, English Channel - 250grt, built 1914, Grimsby-reg GY957 (He – Lowestoft), Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, hired 6/15 (wi - 12/16), 1-12pdr or 3pdr, Admiralty No.3202, Lt Edward Roberts RNR, Skipper Isaac Pearce, employed as patrol vessel, Dover Patrol, near Royal Sovereign LV. Mined at 1825, laid by UC.21 (Reinhold Saltzwedel) shortly before, sank rapidly off Royal Sovereign LV, off Beachy Head (C - by mine in North Sea; D - by submarine off Dover; wi - in 50.40N, 00.30E; He - 1 mile SW of Royal Sovereign LV); both officers and 10 ratings lost (He – 7 survivors). Note; according to “The Dover Patrol 1914-18”, a U-boat fired a torpedo at a British destroyer, missed and hit HMS Dagon with the loss of all her crew including Lt E E Roberts; “Swept Channels” supports the torpedoing, the ship exploding violently and sinking almost at once. It goes on to report that “none of the officers and crew below” were saved (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3207)

DALEWOOD, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 February 1918, Irish Sea - 2,420grt, built 1911, Shipping Controller (un – Wm France, Fenwick & Co), London-reg, 1-12pdr, 25 crew, Mr D Jones, Cardiff for Scapa Flow with 3,000t coal. Torpedoed by U.105 (Friedrich Strackerjan) starboard-side in boiler room at 1630, sank almost immediately 10 miles SW of Isle of Man (un – in 53.48N, 05.09W; wi - in 53.55N, 05W); port lifeboat lowered with about 18 men but capsized when she went down, seven men held onto the boat, righted it with the help of the U-boat crew who then gave the survivors a course to steer for the Isle of Man. One died early next morning and the remaining six reached Castletown Bay and landed at Hango at 0600. Of the 19 lives lost including master, around 7 must have been killed in the explosion, 11 from the capsizing and the man who died in the boat (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un/wi)

DE LA POLE, hired trawler, 4 February 1916, Dover Straits - 255grt, built 1911, Hull-reg H377, National Steam Trawling, hired 5/15 as minesweeper, 1-47mm, Admiralty No.1636, 12 crew, Skipper Robert Hill RNR, Dover Patrol, out in the “worst southerly gale in recent years”. Went aground in Trinity Bay, Goodwin Sands close to wrecked liner Montrose (wi - in 51.12.30N, 01.31.30E); North Deal lifeboat Charles Dibdin came to her assistance, rescued 11 crew but a rating was drowned, survivors landed at Broadstairs instead of Deal because of the weather. Coxswain William Adams awarded the RNLI Silver Medal (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/dq/hw/wi; ADM.137/212)

DELIVERER, hired drifter, 3 November 1917, Irish Sea - 79grt, built 1910, Banff-reg BF151, W Gardiner, hired 2/15 as net drifter, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.2561, net barrier tender based at Kingstown, Dublin, Skipper William Sutherland RNR. Following a reported U-boat sighting, she was on patrol outside Dublin Bay and disappeared, cause unknown, presumed sunk by U-boat (He – mined; un – identified U-boat; wi - mined, sank near Baily LH, off Howth, Co Dublin, in 53.22N, 06.01W); 9 ratings and  skipper killed. Drifter Amity found some wreckage and Deliverer's boat about 1 mile ESE of Bailey's light (H/L/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/575)

DELPHINULA, Admiralty-owned red-ensign oiler, 24 August 1918, Mediterranean - 5,238grt/10,500t, built 1908, armed, The Shipping Controller, sailing from Naples. Torpedoed and damaged by U.63 (Kurt Hartwig) W of Cerigo Strait, in 35.42N, 11.16E, beached Suda Bay, Crete (H/L/D/sl/un)

DERBENT, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 30 November 1917, Irish Sea - 3,178grt, built 1907, The Admiralty, London, armed, Liverpool for Queenstown (Cobh) with 3,850t fuel/furnace oil. Torpedoed by U.96 (Heinrich Jess), sank 6 miles NE by E of Lynas Point, Anglesey (wi - in 53.28.30N, 04.10W). Wreck lies in “19 fathoms” (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

DERWENT, destroyer, 2 May 1917, English Channel - E-class, Hawthorn Leslie, 620t, 1903, 412pdr/218in tt, 25kts, 70 crew, Pendant No.D.15, most of class assigned to Patrol Flotillas, Lt Edward Thornton. Escorting hospital ship into Le Havre, reached Whistle buoy at harbour entrance. Mined at 0525, laid by UC.26 (Matthias Graf von Schmettow), back broken and split in two, fore part capsized, after part went down after about seven minutes (dx - 2 cables N of Whistle Buoy, Havre); 1 officer and 57 ratings lost, local boats picked up survivors (He – 1 officer and 61 men; ge - 62 lives) (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ge/un; ADM.137/3257)

DEVONIA, paddle minesweeper – see FAIR MAID, paddle minesweeper, 9 November 1916, North Sea

DEWEY, hired drifter, 12 August 1917, English Channel - 83grt, built 1908, Lowestoft-reg LT59, hired 11/14 as patrol boat, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.1297, Dover Patrol. Skipper Frederick Henry Burwood RNR. On patrol near Royal Sovereign LV, heading to meet oiler Suram and provide escort, dark night. In collision with darkened SS Glenifer, 9,428grt, sank off Royal Sovereign LV, off Beachy Head, near Eastbourne; 1 officer, 10 ratings lost (He – one survivor) (H/D/He/dk/dq; ADM.1/8495/180)

DHOON, Admiralty trawler, 24 November 1916, North Sea - 275grt, built 1916, Fleetwood-reg FD244, hired 9/16 as minesweeper (wi - armed patrol vessel), 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.2959, Skipper Allan Ramsay RNR. Sweeping between the Newarp and Cross Sand lights, about 150 yards SW of the light. Mined late morning, laid by UC.19 (Alfred Nitzsche), bows blown off and sank near Newarp LV, NE of Yarmouth (wi - in 52.35N, 01.54E); Skipper and 11 ratings lost (He – two survivors) (H/L/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3194)

DOCKLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 3 June 1917, NW Mediterranean - Leaf-class, 5,311grt or 12,300tgrt, built 1917, The Shipping Controller (Lane & MacAndrew), London, armed, sailing Port Arthur for Spezia with oil. Mined, laid by UC.35 (Ernst von Voigt) off Genoa, in 44.20N, 08.45W, damaged, reached port (H/L/D/un)

DON BENITO, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 March 1917, off SW England - 3,749grt, built 1906, London-reg, Buenos Aires & Pacific Railway, 32 crew, Mr H Fenwick, Swansea for Leghorn with patent coal, iron bar/rod/sheet/tube. In collision at night with Liverpool-reg SS Ultonia, sank in 49.35N, 06.44W, SW of Scillies (wi - 2 miles S50ºW of Bishop Rock, in 49.51.30N, 06.29.30W) (H/Lr/wi)

DONSIDE, hired trawler, Sunday 7 January 1917, North Sea -182grt, built 1900, Aberdeen-reg A.155, G F Paul, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.268, Skipper Ernest Jefferson RNR. Sweeping field off Lowestoft, recovering sweep wires and a mine probably snagged on the wire. Explosion around 1600, mine laid by UC.4 (Georg Reimarus) in mid-December, sank quickly off Lowestoft, Suffolk (He - 52.17N, 01.44E; wi - in 52.28N, 01.47E); 5 ratings lost (He – 4 men lost) (+L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3227)

DORISBROOK, Admiralty chartered collier, 9 February 1918, South Pacific - 3,431grt, built 1915, London-reg, M & R SS Co (Miller & Richards), London. In collision and sank (ms – 7 February in 05.48S, 81.19W) (H/Lr/ms)

DRAGONFLY [01], river gunboat – see BUTTERFLY, gunboat, 4 January 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

DRAGONFLY [02], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

DROMONBY, Admiralty collier, 13 January 1916, Atlantic off Portugal - 3,627grt, built 1900, West Hartlepool-reg, R Ropner, Cardiff for St Vincent (CV) with coal (kp - for British cruiser squadron off South America). Captured by German raider Möwe, stopped with shot across the bows, boarded by scuttling party and sunk by charges 220 miles W true of Lisbon (L - in 38.20N, 13.30W) (H/L/Lr/Mn/kp)

DRONNING MAUD, Admiralty chartered collier, 22 April 1918, Western Mediterranean - 2,663grt, built 1917, Newcastle-reg, Shipping Controller, armed, Sunderland for Malta with coal. Torpedoed by U.34 (Johannes Klasing), sank 65 miles N by E3/4E of Cape Sigli, near Bougie, Algeria (L/te/un - in 38N, 04.56E); one crew lost (H/L/te/un)

DRUMMER BOY [01], hired trawler – see OLDENE, hired trawler, 2 February 1917, North Sea

DRUMMER BOY [02], hired trawler – see JOHN E LEWIS, hired trawler, 16 January 1918, North Sea

DRYAD, minesweeper – see NELSON (G. & E.), Q-ship, 15 August 1917, North Sea

DUCHESS OF BUCCLEUCH, paddle minesweeper – see FAIR MAID, paddle minesweeper, 9 November 1916, North Sea

DUCKBRIDGE, Admiralty collier, 22 February 1916, Atlantic off N Scotland - 1,491grt, built 1914, Newcastle-reg, Duckbridge SS, from Cardiff with coal. Mined, laid by unknown U-boat, sank 6 miles N of Straithie Point, to W of Pentland Firth; 19 lives lost including master (H/L/Lr/te)

DULCIE DORRY, hired drifter – see CALISTOGA, hired drifter, 13 May 1916, Adriatic

DUNDEE [01], armed boarding steamer – see ACHILLES, cruiser, 16 March 1917, North Sea

DUNDEE [02], armed boarding steamer, 3 September 1917, Atlantic off SW England - 2,187grt, built 1911, Dundee-reg, Dundee, Perth & London Shipping, hired 11/10/15, 2-4in, Pendant No.MI.12, Captain Selwyn Mitchell Day RNR. Escorting convoy. (te/un - 2nd) – Torpedoed at 2230 on 2nd by UC.49 (Karl Petri) (C/ge - U.19), started to settle, 103 survivors taken off by US destroyer Rowan, trawler Neil Smith stood by and tug Sun II sent from the Scillies to salvage her. Dundee foundered at 1100 on the 3rd, SW of Scillies (He/un - 48.50N 09.20W); 1 officer, 6 MMR lost, one crew DOW next day (He – 9 men killed by explosion) (H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ge/te/un; ADM.137/512, ADM.137/513)

DUSTER, hired trawler, 17 December 1917, Atlantic off SW England - 192grt, built 1911, Hull-reg H267, Kelsall Bros & Beeching, hired 11/14 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.421. Left Penzance afternoon of the 15th, under tow of armed trawler Lark II for a refit at Bristol. Weather worsened and by afternoon of the 17th had reached a strong NW storm. Tow parted off Trevose Head and Duster was driven ashore, wrecked in Scratten Cove near Portreath, NW of St Ives (wi - in 50.15.45N, 05.17.45W); no lives lost, the small towing crew was taken off by rocket apparatus (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/640)


E

E.5, submarine, 7 March 1916, North Sea - E-class, 655/796t, 1912, 1-12pdr/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 15/9kts, c30 crew, Pendant No.I.85, believed Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr Harrington Edwards, sailed with E.23, E.29, H.5 on 4th, E.5 for patrol in Heligoland Bight, possibly sighted by E.29 afternoon of 6th N of Juist island, the other three returned on the 10th, E.5 failed to, "overdue, presumed lost”. Around 7th - Lost, cause unknown, possibly mined or accident, German destroyers escorting battlecruiser Seydlitz in the area reported attacking a submarine at 0810 on the 7th, a few hours later, cruiser Regensburg sighted a submarine not far from a German minefield off the Western Ems which may well have accounted for E.5; 3 officers, 27 ratings lost, no survivors (ke - 33 lost) (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/go/ke/on)

E.16, submarine, 22 August 1916, North Sea - E-class, 667/807t, 23/9/14, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, Pendant No.I.96, believed Harwich-based 9th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr Kenneth Duff-Dunbar DSO, sailed on 18th with E.38 for patrol in Heligoland Bight area as part of the Grand Fleet operation to intercept German units, and which led to the loss of Falmouth and Nottingham. Last sighting was by E.38, 35 miles E of Yarmouth, nothing more heard from her, “overdue, presumed lost”. Around 22nd - Lost, cause unknown, most sources list her as possibly mined, otherwise accident. E.38 later reported group of warships near Terschelling and splashes which may have been depth-charges; also Germans reported making attack on a periscope on the 22nd, possibly E.16, although they made no claims for her sinking (He – wreck found int 2001 near Heligoland with apparent mine damage); 3 officers, 28 ratings lost (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/go/ke/on/wi)

E.17, submarine, 6 January 1916, North Sea - E-class, 667/807t, 16/1/15, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, c30 crew, Pendant No.I.97, believed Harwich-based 8th flotilla, Lt-Cdr John Moncreiffe, on patrol submerged off Dutch coast, N of Texel island. Struck uncharted sandbank in the early hours and badly damaged, surfaced and decided to return to base. Cruiser sighted bows on, possibly German, E.17 tried to dive but flooding forced her back to the surface, turned out to be Dutch cruiser Noord Brabant, distress flares fired, crew taken off and boat scuttled, sinking at 1140; no lives lost, all 33 crew survived, interned at Groningen until the end of the war. Conning tower salvaged in 1986, in RN Submarine Museum (H/J/C/Cn/D/He*/bw/dk/dx/go/ke; ADM.137/1245, ADM.1/8444/3)

E.22 [01], submarine – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

E.22 [02], submarine – see E.26, submarine, 3 July 1916, North Sea

E.23, submarine – see E.5, submarine, 7 March 1916, North Sea

E.24, submarine minelayer, 24 March 1916, North Sea - E-class, 667/807t, 9/12/15, 3-18in tt/20 mines, 15k/9kts, c30 crew, believed Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr George Naper, sailed Harwich 21st for minelaying patrol in Heligoland Bight, not heard from again, "overdue, presumed lost". Around 24th - Lost, cause unknown, although with many British and German fields in the area and her own laying area only 3 miles from a previous one, most sources assume mined; 4 officers, 31 ratings lost, no survivors (ke - 34 lost). Wreck found in 1973, inspection of the hull confirmed mining (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/go/ke/on)

E.26, submarine, 3 July 1916, North Sea - E-class, 662/667t, 11/11/15, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, c30 crew, believed Harwich-based 9th Flotilla, Lt Edward Ryan, failed to return to Harwich on the 6th from patrol in southern North Sea off the entrance to the River Ems, "overdue, presumed lost”. Before or on the 6th, probably 3rd - Lost, cause unknown, German patrol boat reported following oil trail near the Ems on the 2nd, submarine spotted next day and attacked, E.22 was on patrol in that area and was probably the submarine attacked, E.55 about 20 miles N of E.26's area also heard depth-charging although German records make no claim for a sinking at that time, otherwise mined or accident; 3 officers, 28 ratings. Note: according to the British destroyer section of Conway’s, and contrary to most sources, there is no written evidence that E-class submarines E.25 & E.26 had been ordered by Turkey pre-August 1914 (H/J/C/Cn/D/bw/dk/go/ke/on; Casualty list for 3rd)

E.29, submarine – see E.5, submarine, 7 March 1916, North Sea

E.30 [01], submarine, 7 April 1916, North Sea - E-class, Blyth-based 11th Flotilla, presumably alongside depot ship Titania. Battery explosion on board; 3 ratings lost from E.30, 1 from Titania (Cn/D/dk/se)

E.30 [02], submarine, 22 November 1916, North Sea - E-class, 662/667t, 29/6/15, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, believed Harwich-based 9th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr Geoffrey Biggs, sailed from Harwich 15th to patrol area 53.25-54.00N, 03.30-04.00E off Dutch Frisian Islands, not heard from again, failed to return on 22nd, “overdue, presumed lost”. On or before 22nd (ke - possibly 15th) - Lost, cause unknown, possibly mined in Heligoland Bight or as early as the 15th in new field off Orford Ness not discovered until 25 November; 3 officers and 27 ratings lost (other sources - 3 officers and 30 ratings) (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/ke/on; Casualty list, dated 22nd)

E.31, submarine – see GALATEA, light cruiser, 4 May 1916, North Sea

E.38, submarine – see E.16, submarine, 22 August 1916, North Sea

E.47, submarine, 20 August 1917, North Sea - E-class, 667/807t, 29/5/16, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, c30 crew, believed Harwich-based 9th Flotilla, Lt Edward Carre, E.47 was one of four Harwich E-class boats patrolling off the Dutch coast near Texel, failed to return on 20th, "overdue, presumed lost. Around the 20th - lost, cause unknown, possibly mined or accident; 3 officers, 29 ratings lost, all hands (H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/go/ke/on; ADM.137/3709)

E.49, submarine, 12 March 1917, Shetlands - E-class, 667/807t, 18/9/16, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, Tees-based 10th Flotilla, Lt Basil Beal, sailed from Balta Sound for anti-U-boat patrol off Muckle Flugga searching for U-boats breaking out into the Atlantic. Seen leaving Balta Sound at 1225 (He – 1255), passed behind Huney Island, explosion heard and cloud of smoke observed (wi - 500yds SSW of Balta LH, in 60.44.14N, 00.47.51W), E.49 not seen again although some wreckage found by drifters; 3 officers, 28 ratings lost. Divers discovered her with bows blown off by a mine, laid by UC.76 (Wilhelm Barten) on the 10th (dx - by U.76 in company with UC.43; ke - UC.70). Wreck lies in 100ft of water (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dx/dk/go/ke/on/un/wi)

E.50 [01], submarine, E-class, 19 April 1917, North Sea - 667/807t, possibly Harwich-based 9th Flotilla. Submerged and in collision with UC.62 also submerged off North Hinder LV (Cn/D/dx)

E.50 [02], submarine, 31 January 1918, North Sea - E-class, 667/807t, 13/11/16, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, c30 crew, believed Harwich 9th or Tees-based 10th Flotilla, Lt Ralph Snook, failed to return from North Sea patrol on 31st, “overdue, presumed lost”. Cause unknown (C/Cn/D/bw - mined on or about 1 February; He – presumed lost before 31st by accident or mining); 3 officers, 28 ratings lost (H/J/C/Cn/D/bw/dk/ke/on)

E.51, submarine, 29 November 1917, North Sea  - UB.61 sunk by mine laid by E.51 off Holland  (dx/un)

E.52, submarine, 1 November 1917, Dover Straits – E.52 sank UC.63 off the Goodwin Sands (dx/un)

E.54 [01], submarine, 21 August 1916, North Sea - UC.10 torpedoed and sunk by E.54 off Dutch coast (dx)

E.54 [02], submarine, 1 May 1917, SW of Ireland - U.81 sunk by E.54 (dx)

EARL KITCHENER, hired trawler – see ML.38, motor launch, c18 June 1916, Palestine Campaign

EARL LENNOX, hired trawler, 23 October 1917, off SW Scotland - 226grt, built 1914, Strand Steam Fishing Co, Grimsby-reg GY367, hired 4/15 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.1441, Skipper George William Taylor RNR. Escorting ammunition carrier Dunarea through the Sound of Islay in company with trawler Davara. Earl Lennox was mined forward at 1300, the mine laid by U.79 (Otto Rohrbeck). She broke up and sank off the entrance to the Sound, separating Islay and Jura islands (He - 55.44.30N 06.00W; un – S of Islay Sound in 55.45N, 05.57W, Mine Barrage 171 laid 24/9/17; wi - in 55.45N, 06W); 7 ratings lost. Believing the explosion to be a U-boat attack, Davara lowered a boat to assist, but continued to escort Dunarea through the Sound. On returning, only four survivors had been found (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3296)

EASTFIELD, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 November 1917, English Channel - 2,145grt, built 1901, London-reg, Field Line, Cardiff, 1-90mm, 23 crew, Mr J Humphreys, Newport for Dieppe with coal. Torpedoed by UB.57 (Otto Steinbrinck), hit in coal bunkers at 1040, sank 7 miles ESE of Dodman Point, near Falmouth, Cornwall (wi - 7 miles SE of, in 50.14.06N, 04.42.06W); one fireman missing, survivors picked up by Mevagissey lifeboat and landed there (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

EAVESTONE, Admiralty chartered collier, 3 February 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 1,858grt, built 1912, West Hartlepool-reg, Furness, Withy, Barry for Gibraltar with coal. Captured by U.45 (Erich Sittenfeld), sunk by gunfire 95 miles W of Fastnet Rock, off Co Cork (te - in 51.00N, 12.00W); 5 crew lost, including master (+L/Lr/Mn/te/un)

EBRO [01], armed merchant cruiser, 21 March 1917, north of British Isles - members of her armed guard were on Norwegian barque Naiade or Najade, when the barque was sunk by U.59 off Fair Isle. All four of the armed guard were lost (dk)

EBRO [02], armed merchant cruiser, 26 May 1917, North Atlantic area - 8,480grt, built 1915, hired 23/3/15, 10th CS. Attacked by U-boat and narrowly missed by torpedo(es) (Mn/D)

ECHO [01], Admiralty whaler – see HYACINTH, light cruiser, 11 April 1916, German East Africa Campaign

ECHO [02], Admiralty whaler – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916, German East Africa Campaign

ECHUNGA, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 5 September 1917, Atlantic off NW France - 6,285grt, built 1907 (Lr - 4,589grt; un – converted to tanker in 1916 by installing tanks in the holds), Adelaide SS Co, Port Adelaide-reg (un – Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co), armed (sl - Admiralty oiler No.169, presumably Y7.169), sailing Port Arthur for UK with fuel oil. Torpedoed by U.52 (Hans Walther), sank 40 miles N by E of Ushant; 9 crew lost (H/L/Lr/sl/te/un)

EDEN, destroyer, 18 June 1916, English Channel - E-class, c540t, 1903, 412pdr/218in tt, 25kts, 70 crew, Pendant No.D.17, most of class assigned to Patrol Flotillas based at Dover, Humber, Forth and Tyne, HMS Eden not listed as Dover Patrol, Lt Alastair C Farquhar. (J/He - 17th) – escorting transport SS France to Le Havre, when at 0300, the transport's steering gear failed. Eden, on her starboard bow, was informed but before avoiding action could be taken, the destroyer was hit amidships and cut in two. Forward half sank immediately, after half stayed afloat, and towed into Le Havre (ke – sunk in North Sea); Lt Farquhar, 2 officers and 39 ratings lost (He – 39 men lost) (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dx/ke/wi; ADM.1/8460/150)

EGLANTINE, convoy sloop, 5 February 1918, Atlantic off N Ireland - Anchusa-class, 1,290t, presumably escorting convoy. Collided with and sank SS Brittany 2,926grt in 55.50N, 08.30W, N of Tory Is (D/gr)

EL TORO, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 2 January 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 5,958grt, built 1913, London-reg, Lobitos Oilfields, 35 crew, Mr Burdiss, from Port Arthur with fumace fuel oil. Wrecked on Blasket Is, N entrance to Dingle Bay (wi - 300yds offshore, NW of Clogher Head, Blaskets, in 52.09.30N, 10.28.10W) (+Lr/wi)

ELAX, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 10 October 1916, Central Mediterranean - 3,980grt, built 1893, Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, London-reg, armed, (sl - Admiralty oiler No.133, presumably Y7.133), Rangoon for Malta with fuel oil. Torpedoed by UB.43 (Hans von Mellenthin), sank 70 miles WSW of Cape Matapan, Greece (L/te - in 35.54N, 21.19E) (H/L/Lr/sl/te/un)

ELEANOR, Admiralty mine carrier, 12 February 1918, English Channel - ex-coaster, 1,980grt, built 1888, Eleanor SS Co (J Ridley, Son & Tully, Managers), South Shields-reg, hired 8/14 as RFA, Pendant No.Y6.1, armed, Lt Arthur Brain RNR in command, sailing Immingham for Falmouth with government stores including 200 type D depth charges, 605 BE ordinary mines, 570 filled spherical Mk.III AP mines, 30 filled spherical Mk.III GC mines and 229 filled spherical BE mines. Torpedoed by the submerged UB.57 (Johannes Lohs) at 0440, sank immediately 9 miles W by S1/2S of St Catherines Point, Isle of Wight (L/He/te/un - in 50.30N, 01.30W; He/wi - 12 miles ESE of Anvil Point, in 50.30.02N, 01.40.21W), U-boat then surfaced to identify victim; 34 lives including master were lost, 2nd Officer Barton Hunter was the only survivor, picked up by drifter Parisienne. Wreck is much broken up in 120ft with old mines in evidence (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/te/un/wi; ADM.137/691)

ELECTRA II [01], hired trawler, 15 April 1916, Dover Straits - 269grt, built 1904, Hull-registered, hired 7/15 as minesweeper, Dover Patrol. (dq/sc - 14th) - Badly damaged in collision, water rose rapidly in the machinery space, engines kept going, ship stayed afloat and reached Dover with decks awash (D/dp/dq/sc)

ELECTRA II [02], hired trawler – see ST GERMAIN, hired trawler, 15 August 1916, Dover Straits

ELLA SAYER, Admiralty chartered collier, 29 April 1918, English Channel - may be spelt Ellis Sayer, 2,549grt, built 1898, Newcastle-reg, Ella Sayer SS, armed, Mr J Doughty, Penarth for Dunkirk with coal. (te/un - 30th) - Torpedoed port-side amidships by UB.57 (Johannes Lohs), sank an hour later 15 miles E by N of Royal Sovereign LV, off Beachy Head (te/un - in 50.49N, 00.48E; wi - in 50.50.30N, 00.47.59E); two crew killed by explosion (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

ELLASTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 6 March 1918, Atlantic off Canaries - 3,192grt, built 1890, Ellaston SS, armed, Barry for Sierra Leone with coal. Captured by U.152 (Constantin Kolbe), sunk with bombs 180 miles W by S true of Palma (L/te - in 28.29N, 21W; te - torpedoed and damaged before capture); master taken prisoner. Kolbe was on British list of war criminals for this sinking, case did not go to court (H/L/ge/os/te/un)

ELLERSLIE, Admiralty chartered collier, 3 October 1917, location not known - 299grt. Wrecked, no other details. Note: Lloyds Registers only list Ellerslie, 1906, 3,854grt, Cardiff-reg, owned 1917/18 by Hansen Shipping Co

ELMLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 24 December 1917, Atlantic off NW Scotland - Leaf-class, 5,948grt (12,300 tons), built 1917, armed, Shipping Controller (Lane & Macandrew), London, sailing from Port Arthur with fuel oil. Torpedoed by U.91 (Alfred von Glasenapp) N of North Minch (L/un - in 58.26N, 05.34W), damaged, put into Stornoway (H/L/Mn/D/un)

ELSISTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 19 October 1917, Central Mediterranean - 2,908grt, built 1915, Elsiston SS Co, Glasgow, armed, Malta for Suda Bay with war stores. Torpedoed by Austrian U.XIV (Georg Ritter von Trapp), sank 150 miles E by S1/2S of Malta (te/un - in 35.40N, 17.28E); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

EMILY REAICH, hired drifter – see ADEQUATE, hired motor drifter, 2 December 1916, Shetlands

ENDEAVOUR, hired trawler, 10 March 1918, Orkneys - 156grt, built 1894, Aberdeen-reg A403, G Craig, hired 1915 as boom defence vessel. Run down by tug Heracles, foundered at 1245 at Kirkwall boom (D - off Kirkwall); no lives lost (H/Lr/C/D/dk/He; ADM.137/734)

ENDURANCE, hired drifter, 5 April 1916, English Channel - 94grt, built 1907, Fraserburgh-reg, hired 12/15 as net drifter, 1-6pdr AA, Skipper T Wylie. Submarine sighted in Havre Roads near Whistling Buoy, six drifters of the Havre Drifter Flotilla ordered out and shot their nets, Endurance's was fouled, and U.26 in trying to get clear hit Endurance's rudder and put it out of action. U-boat sunk in cooperation with French torpedo boat La Trombe. Endurance towed in by HMS Pleasance; skipper awarded DSC (Mn/D)

ENERGY, hired motor drifter, 5 March 1917, North Sea - 45grt, built 1917, Fraserburgh-reg FR7, hired 3/17 probably as harbour tender or coastal service craft, Peterhead for Lowestoft to fit out, probably on maiden voyage, not commissioned at the time. Drove ashore in heavy weather, wrecked in Peterhead Bay, N of Aberdeen (wi - in 57.28.45N, 01.46.30W); no lives lost (H/C/D/dk/wi)

ENGLAND, Admiralty chartered collier, 23 May 1917, Central Mediterranean -3,798grt, built 1906, London-reg, J F Drughorn, armed, sailing Cardiff/Bizerta for Malta with coal. Captured by U.65 (Hermann von Fischel), sunk with bombs 40 miles S by E of Cape Bon, Tunisia (te - by gunfire; L/te/un - in 36.20N, 11.15E); three crew lost including master (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ENTERPRISE II, Admiralty drifter, 8 March 1916, Adriatic Sea - 84grt, built 1906, Lowestoft-reg LT408, hired 1/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.1063, Skipper Chesterfield RNR, drifters now back on the Otranto Barrage nets between Cape Otranto and Saseno Is. Returning to Brindisi with group of drifters, mined at 0700, probably laid by UC.12 (Eberhard Frohner) on 3 March, sank off Brindisi (He - about 2 miles N of Cape Pedagne lighthouse); 8 ratings lost (He – 2 survivors) (H/L/C/D/He/ap/dk/un; ADM.137/3160)

ENTERPRISE, hired drifter – see CAPE COLONY, hired drifter, 8 January 1917, North Sea

EREBUS, monitor, 28 October 1917, Dover Straits - Erebus-class, 8,450t, 2-15in/2-6in/2-12pdr/1-3in AA, Dover Patrol Monitor Squadron on bombardment duties off the Belgian coast, based at Dover. Hit 9 miles off Ostend by German distance-controlled explosive boat (DCB) FL12 operated from shore by electrical signals sent along an unreeling cable, directed by spotting seaplane and carrying 1,540lb charge. Blew 50ft hole in her bulge but did little damage to the hull; 2 ratings killed, 15 wounded by the blast, members of the crew standing on deck and watching the approaching boat who were unaware of the danger. That same day destroyer Botha hit another one with pom-pom fire and blew it up. Erebus repaired and back in service by 21/11/17 (Cn/D/dq)

ERIC CALVERT, Admiralty chartered collier, 22 April 1918, English Channel - 1,962grt, built 1889, Goole-reg, Calvert SS (te/wi – differ; un – J Mitchell & Sons, Dundee), 1-12pdr, 25 crew, Penarth for Falmouth/Boulogne with coal, slowing to enter Falmouth defences. Torpedoed by UB.103 (Paul Hundius) starboard-side abaft engine room at 0200, sank 4 miles SSW of St Anthony Head, Cornwall (L - 2 miles SE of Falmouth boom defence; un/wi - in 50.04.30N, 05.01.45W); two crew lost, survivors picked up by boom defence vessel and landed at Falmouth (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

ERIDGE, paddle minesweeper, October 1917, off S Ireland - Ascot-class, 810t, 23/2/16, believed Queenstown-based 8th Fast Sweeping Flotilla. One of two minesweepers in collision with US destroyers off Queenstown (Cobh), Co Cork during the month, in this case, USS Wadsworth 1,205t. The other sweeper was Zinnia (D/gr/sc)

ERIN’S ISLE, paddle minesweeper, 7 February 1919, North Sea - 633grt, built 1912, hired 21/11/15, 1-6pdr/1-6pdr AA, P/No.571, Lieutenant Richard Plowman, post war sweeping operations. At anchor, and at 0600 detonated drifting mine, broke up and sank rapidly near Edinburgh LV, Nore in Thames Estuary; 24 ratings lost (J/C/Cn/D/He/dx; ADM.116/2062)

ERMINE, fleet messenger, 2 August 1917, Aegean Sea - 1,777grt, built 1912, G & J Burns, Glasgow-reg, hired c16/7/15, Pendant No.Y4.25, Lieutenant Matthew Boggan DSC RNR. Sailed from Stavros, Salonika peninsula at midnight on the 1st, with naval stores and passengers for Mudros, Lemnos island. Mined starboard side at 0100, laid by UC.23 (Volkhard von Bothmer), quickly sank by the head with little time to launch boats (He/un – mined in 40.39N, 23.34E; other sources - either torpedoed or mined); 3 officers, 3 ratings, 17 MMR lost (He – 24 men lost (H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/te/un; ADM.137/3690)

ESKBURN, hired drifter, 30 November 1916, Dover Straits - 90grt, built 1914, Whitby-reg WY18, Robert Milburn, hired 1914 (D - 1/15) as net drifter, Admiralty No.747, Dover Patrol, Skipper John Crane RNR. In collision with paddle minesweeper Kylemore off Dover (wi - damaged off Dover, made The Downs, sank 1m E by S of Old Stairs Bay, Kingsdown, in 51.10.50N, 01.25.50E; He - foundered in Old Stairs Bay, Kent, in 51.11.10N, 01.25.50E); no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk/dq/wi; ADM.137/312)

ESKMERE, Admiralty chartered collier, 13 October 1917, Irish Sea - 2,293grt, built 1916, The Bromport SS Co, Liverpool, armed, Belfast for Barry in ballast. Torpedoed by UC.75 (Johannes Lohs), sank 15 miles WNW of South Stack Rock, Anglesey (wi - in 53.38N, 05W); 20 lives lost including master (H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un/wi)

ETAL MANOR, Admiralty chartered collier, 19 September 1917, St George's Channel - 1,875grt, built 1916, John Fenwick & Son, Newcastle, sailing Barry for Queenstown (Cobh) with coal. Torpedoed by UC.48 (Kurt Ramien), sank 7 miles S by W of Hook Point, Co Wexford (L/wi - 10 miles due S of the LH, in 51.58N, 06.50W); 6 lives lost including master (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un/wi)

ETHEL & MILLIE, Q-ship – see NELSON (G. & E.), Q-ship, 15 August 1917, North Sea

ETHEL DUNCAN, Admiralty chartered collier, 18 October 1916, Atlantic off N Scotland - one of two colliers - sister was Agnes Duncan, ordered to meet Naval requirements and amongst the largest engines-aft colliers of the period, 2,510grt, built 1912, Cardiff-reg, Ethel Duncan SS, on long-term charter to Admiralty prewar, 22 crew, Mr A Murphy, from Cardiff with coal. U.20 (Walther Schwieger) sighted 3 1/2m away, opened fire at 0910, continued to chase for an hour hitting her four times, master stopped engines and abandoned ship at 1020, U-boat fired two or possibly three torpedoes hitting her once, then fired more shells before Ethel Duncan went down at 1155, about 40 miles WNW from Noop Head, Westray island, Orkneys (W/te - in 59.25N, 04.36W), ship’s papers destroyed by the master before torpedoes fired, rigged sails on the lifeboats and headed for the Orkneys, picked up by trawler Valta 22 miles W of Noup Head and landed at Stornaway (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

ETHELBALD, drifter (not known if in Admiralty service) – see NOBLE, destroyer, 4 August 1916, North Sea

ETHNEE, hired drifter, Tuesday 15 January 1918, Dover Straits - 86grt, built 1913, North Shields-reg SN227, hired 1914 (D - 1/15) as net drifter, Admiralty No.754, Dover Patrol, based at Dover, Skipper George Hammond RNR. Driven ashore around 0700 in gale force winds on the Goodwin Sands, off Deal and broke up (D - Goodwins, near Fork Light; wi - in 51.16N, 01.32E, but “in an unidentified position”); no lives lost. See also ML.278 (H/C/D/He/dk/dq/wi; ADM.1/84960, ADM.137/684)

ETTON, Admiralty collier, 20 September 1916, Barents Sea - 2,831grt, built 1905, Hull-reg, Etton SS, Barry for Archangel with coal. Mined, laid by U.75 (Kurt Beitzen), sank off Sviatoi Nos on Kola Penisula (te - in 67.36N, 41.20E); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ETTRICK, destroyer, 7 July 1917, English Channel - E-class, 550t, 412pdr/218in tt, 25kts, 70 crew, Pendant No.D.32, assigned to Patrol Flotillas. Originally described as mined, possibly laid by UC.61, but listed by Uboat.net as torpedoed by UC.61 (Georg Gerth) 15 miles SW of Beachy Head, lost bow up to and including bridge (dx - sunk 15 miles S by W of Beachy Head); 48 ratings killed (un – 49). Sold 5/19 to James Dredging for BU (C/Cn/D/dk/dx/un)

EUSTON (1), hired trawler, 12 February 1917, North Sea - 209grt, built 1906, Fleetwood-reg FD67, Lune Steam Fishing, hired 6/15 as minesweeper (wi - armed trawler), 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1589, Skipper William Christian RNR. Mined, laid by UC.30 (Heinrich Stenzler) earlier that day, sank at 1030 near Longmoor buoy off Hartlepool, Durham (He - 54.40.20N, 01.19.10N; wi - in 54.40.26N, 01.09.02W); Skipper and 10 ratings lost (He – only 2 crew saved) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/ft/un/wi; ADM.137/358)

EUSTON (2), Admiralty chartered collier, 25 October 1917, Central Mediterranean - 2,841grt, built 1910, London-reg, Euston SS, armed, Cardiff/Malta for Mudros with coal. (H/L - 24th) - Torpedoed by UC.34 (Horst Obermüller) (un – not Austrian U.XIV as in other sources), sank 37 miles SW of Cape Matapan, Greece (L - 36.40N, 22.21E; te - in 34.53N, 19.50E; un – in 35.33N, 21.48E); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

EVADNE, hired trawler, 27 February 1917, English Channel - 189grt, built 1907, Hull-reg H.945, Great Northern SS Fishing, hired 1915 (D - 9/14) as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.148, Skipper W Motley (He - Skipper John Barron RNR). Mined at 1030, laid by UC.65 (Otto Steinbrinck) on 25 February, sank off Owers LV, SE of Selsey Bill (He - about 8 miles S of the Owers; wi - in 50.39.30N, 00.41.15W); 1 officer, 11 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/un/wi; ADM.137/362)

EVANGEL, hired trawler, 25 March 1917, St George's Channel - 197grt, built 1914, Grimsby-reg GY970, Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, hired 1916 (D - 3/15) as minesweeper (wi - patrol mine sweeper), 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.1408, Milford Haven-based, Skipper William Winchester RNR. Mined, laid by UC.48 (Kurt Ramien), sank off St Ann's Head, W entrance to Milford Haven (He - about 5 cables NNE of Barrels light vessel off Milford Haven; wi - in 51.40N, 05.10W); Skipper, 14 ratings lost, no survivors (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/ps/un/wi; ADM.137/392)

EVENING STAR, hired drifter – see CALISTOGA, hired drifter, 13 May 1916, Adriatic

EVERARD, hired drifter, 15 January 1916, St George's Channel - 82grt, built 1907, Inverness-reg INS30, hired 2/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2460, Skipper William Cordiner RNR. In collision with the armed trawler Penguin (190grt) at 6.20am, both ships darkened, sank off Tuskar Rock, off Rosslare (He – 12 miles SE of Tuskar Rock); no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/209, ADM.137/897)

EXCELLENT, Admiralty chartered collier, 9 January 1917, Atlantic off N Scotland - 1,944grt, built 1907, Sunderland-reg, Westoll Line, 19 crew including five Arabs, seven British, one Greek, five Japanese, one Norwegian, master, Mr J Robertson, Penarth for Lerwick/Swarback Minns with coal, government stores. U.70 (Otto Wunsche) surfaced off the port bow and opened fire at 1545, master stopped engines and abandoned ship, sunk by gunfire 40 miles NW from Noop Head, Westray island (te - 40 miles NE of, in 59.37N, 04.18W; wi - in 59.37N, 04.18W); master taken prisoner, survivors afloat for 36 hours, rescued by trawler and landed in Orkneys (+L/Lr/te/un/wi)


F

F. MATARAZZO, Admiralty collier, 15 November 1916, Central Mediterranean - 2,823grt, built 1906, London-reg, F Matarazzo SS, armed, from Cardiff with coal. Torpedoed by U.64 (Robert Moraht), sank 26 miles ENE of Linosa Is, off Tunisia (L - in 35.05N, 13.20E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

FAIR MAID, paddle minesweeper, 9 November 1916, North Sea - 430grt, built 1915, Glasgow-reg, building for North British Steam Packet Co 8/14, fitted out and requisitioned July 1915 (D - purchased), 1-6pdr, Pendant No.589, joined Grimsby Paddlers, crew of 40 or 50, Lt William Bayne RNR i/c, nicknamed “Hurricane Bill”, sailed Lowestoft in the morning with three other paddlers to sweep War Channel, joined sweeps with Cambridge near Cockle LV, sweeping near Cross Sand LV. Mined amidships at 0815, laid by UC.18 (Wilhelm Kiel), blew huge hole from bridge to after well-deck, almost broke in two, after end of vessel swung clear of fore part, Devonia closed to tow but she sank within 20min of the explosion off Winterton-on-Sea, Norfolk, near Cross Sand Buoy (do - 1 mile W of East Cross Sands buoy; wi - in 52.37N, 01.58E); 1 officer, 3 ratings and 1 MMR killed, others blown overboard and injured, survivors rescued by boats from Cambridge, Devonia and Duchess of Buccleuch, landed at Lowestoft (H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/do/sc/wi; ADM.137/3196)

FAME, Q-ship, 19 November 1916, North Sea - (Cn/D/He - Revenge, ex-Fame, also known as Fame), Q-ship/special service ship, auxiliary motor sailing smack, c39grt, built 1898, Lowestoft-reg LT1020, taken up 21/1/16 on Admiralty service. Dragged her anchors in easterly gale off South Holm buoy, in collision with paddle minesweeper that had come to her assistance, foundered off Lowestoft (He - 52.30.35N 01.45.55E; no lives lost (H/Cn/D/He/dk/qs; ADM.137/310)

FANDANGO, tunnel screw minesweeper, 3 July 1919, North Russia - ex-War Department T.98, Dance-class, 1917, P/No.T.2N, Chief Boatswain Thomas Joseph Vosper. Taking part in mine clearance operations 200 miles up the river Dvina, near the town of Troitsa. Sweeping as a pair with Step Dance. Although the channel had been sept three times, mined under her stern and totally wrecked, sank in Dvina River off Troitsa (dk - near Selso); 1 officer, 7 ratings killed (J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ke; ADM.137/3817)

FARNBOROUGH [01], Q-ship, 22 March 1916, Atlantic off SW Ireland - ex-Lodorer, aka Lodorer, Sandyford, Q-ship/special service ship, collier, 3,207grt, built 1904, Admiralty collier Pendant No.Y3.859, hired as decoy ship Q.5 (D - in service 22/10/15; qs - 6/4/16!), 5-12pdr/2-6pdr/1 Maxim mg, Lt-Cdr Gordon Campbell, steaming at 8kts in 51.54N, 10.53W. Sighted U-boat which dived, attacked around 0700 by torpedo which missed, submarine surfaced and "panic party" got away, enemy closed and Farnborough opened fire. U.68 hit before she went down, depth charge dropped, came back to the surface, hit a number of times and went down, finished off by two more depth-charges, Farnborough was not believed damaged in the action; Lt-Cdr Campbell promoted Commander and awarded first of three DSO’s, £1,000 paid out in prize money in £1.18s.1d/£1.90 shares (Cn/D/qs/sk/ub/un/vc)

FARNBOROUGH [02], Q-ship, 17 February 1917, Atlantic W of Ireland - ex-Lodorer, aka Lodorer, Sandyford, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, collier, 3,207grt, built 1904, Admiralty chartered collier, Pendant No.Y3.859, hired as decoy ship Q.5, 5-12pdr/2-6pdr/1 Maxim mg, (D - entered service 22/10/15; qs - 6/4/16), Cdr Gordon Campbell DSO, holds crammed with buoyant timber, on patrol in Western Approaches for 17 days. Torpedo seen approaching starboard side around 0945, ship steered to avoid hit in engine-room, struck No.3 hold but burst engine-room bulkhead, “panic party” away, engine-room flooded. Submarine approached submerged, came to the surface 300yds off at 1005, shortly after rapid and accurate fire was opened, conning tower and hull shattered, U.83 went to the bottom (dx - 67 miles W of Fastnet, in 51.34N, 05.44W; ub - 51.34N, 11.23W). Boats recalled but engine and boiler-rooms, Nos 3, 4 & after holds filling rapidly, and assistance called for, destroyer Narwhal came up and took off the crew, sloop Buttercup arrived and took the Q-ship in tow. Water gaining, depth charge exploded and Buttercup cast off, but the timber cargo kept her afloat, now sloop Laburnam took her in tow for Berehaven, beached in Mill Cove next day; Cdr Gordon Campbell DSO was awarded the Victoria Cross, other awards totalled two DSO’s, three DSCs, ten DSMs, 24 MID. Crew paid off and went into barracks in Devonport, most volunteered to join Cdr Campbell in his next Q-ship (D/dx/qs/sk/ub/un/vc)

FAULKNOR, flotilla leader, 25 September 1917, Belgian coast - mined and damaged off Zeebrugge, one man killed and two DOW (dk)

FAUVETTE, armed boarding steamer, 9 March 1916, southern North Sea - 2,644grt, built 1912, London-reg, General Steam Navigation Co, hired 2-3/15 as RFA store carrier Pendant No.Y8.44, armed boarding steamer from 19/3/15, 2-12pdr, Pendant No.MI.26, Cdr H Wilson RNR, had served in Dardanelles campaign as both store carrier and ABS, present duties uncertain viz. (He – returning to London from Mediterranean; L/te/wi - sailing Girgenti or Agrigento, Sicily for London in ballast, but wi - also steaming toward the Thames on duty as an ABS; ke - on examination duty in The Downs). Mined, probably twice, laid by UC.7 (Georg Haag) (He – UB.29 according to some sources) the previous day, reportedly detonated one, drifted, then hit a second, sank in as little as four minutes probably off North Foreland, Kent (H - in North Sea; J - off East coast; L - off Ramsgate; ke/wi - 30 miles E by N of North Foreland, in 51.27.55N, 02.13.05E; He/te - in the Downs, off North Foreland, in 51.24N, 01.29E); 15 lives lost - 3 officers, 7 ratings, 5 MN (He – 14 lost; wi - 2 officers, 12 ratings drowned), survivors including the CO got away in the two port-side lifeboats (H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/ke/te/un/wi; ADM.1/8450/53)

FERNLEAF [01], Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 10 June 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - Leaf-class, 5,838grt/12,300t, armed. Chased by U-boat, saved by own gunfire (H/Mn/D)

FERNLEAF [02], Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 25 June 1917, Atlantic - Leaf-class, 5,838grt/12,300t, armed, Queenstown for Port Arthur in ballast. U-boat gun attack (L - in 44.45N, 29.18W; un – not listed), saved by own gunfire, listed by Lloyds as damaged (H/L/D)

FERRET, destroyer, 18 January 1917, English Channel - 778t, 1911. Torpedoed and damaged by UC.21 (Reinhold Saltzwedel) SE of St Catherine’s Point, Isle of Wight, one rating died of wounds that day (dk/un only)

FIFI [01], armed steamer, ex-German Kingani – see TOUTOU, armed motor boat, 14 January 1916, German East Africa Campaign

FIFI [02], armed steamer – see MIMI, gunboat, 9 February 1916, German East Africa Campaign

FILEY, Admiralty trawler, 2 October 1916, Atlantic off N Ireland - 226grt, built 1914, Hull-reg H8, Hull Steam Fishing, purchased 1915, in service from 3/15, 1-12pdr, Admiralty No.1363, Skipper Daniel Stather RNR, serving as patrol vessel. Driven ashore in high winds and seas in Camusmore Bay, Tory Is, off Co Donegal, wrecked and abandoned; no lives lost. Salved 1917 (D/He - salved in 1917 and re-acquired July 1918), believed assigned new Admiralty No.3826, sold 1920 (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw; ADM.137/282)

FINROSS, hired drifter, 26 November 1916, Southern Adriatic area - 78grt, built 1911, Londonderry-reg LY872, hired 10/15 as net drifter, 157mm, Admiralty No.2726, Otranto Barrage drifter line, Skipper James Third RNR. (C - 27th) - Ran ashore and wrecked near Gallipoli (not the Dardanelles), Gulf of Taranto (un – mined, laid by UC.14); no lives lost (H/C/D/He/ap/dk/un)

FIONA, armed boarding steamer, 6 September 1917, North Sea - 1,611grt, built 1905, Leith-reg, London & Edinburgh Shipping, hired 28/11/14, 1-4in/1-12pdr, Pendant No. M.17, Commander Sidney Ralph Martin Tyrer RNR. Departed Longhope at midnight for Lerwick. Ran aground at 0100 in dense fog, and wrecked on Clettack Skerry, most easterly of Pentland Skerries in Pentland Firth (wi - in 58.41N, 02.53.30W), tugs unable to salvage her and wreck abandoned; 3 ratings lost (wi - no loss of life) (H/J/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/513)

FIREDRAKE, destroyer, 27 April 1916, North Sea - UC.5 grounded off Harwich, scuttled on arrival of Firedrake, raised and exhibited in Britain (dx)

FIREFLY [01], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 26 February 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

FIREFLY [02], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

FIRST PRIZE, Q-ship, 30 April 1917, Atlantic off SW England - ex-Else, aka Else, Prize, listed in HMSO as Else, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, 3-mast auxiliary schooner, 227grt, built 1901, entered service (D - 6/11/16; qs - 6/4/16) as Q.21, 3-12pdr, Lt W Sanders RNR. In action with U.93 south of Ireland (dx - 120 miles SW of Fastnet) in the early evening, shelled, crippled and nearly sinking, but in return appeared to have sunk the U-boat by heavy return fire at “point-blank range”, U-boat captain and two crew rescued from the water by the “panic party". U.93 made port and Prize managed to reach the Irish coast “with all hands at the pumps” including the prisoners. Acting Lt William Edward Sanders RNR, HM Q-ship First Prize was awarded the Victoria Cross (Cn/D/dx/qs/sk/vc)

FLICKER, hired trawler, 4 March 1916, Dover Straits 192grt, built 1911, Hull-reg H334, Kellsall Bros & Beeching, hired 1915 (D - 11/14), 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.413, Skipper George West RNR, Dover Patrol, patrolling off minefield laid by UC.6, 2 miles SW of Dover Pier warning shipping to keep clear, no longer on station morning of 4th, disappeared (He - night of 4th/ 5th), and no wreckage found. Believed mined, laid by UC.6 (Matthias Graf von Schmettow), sank (wi - in 51.07N, 01.27E); Skipper and 13 ratings lost, no survivors, one body was found floating in its lifebelt on the 5th (H/L/Lr/C/D/dk/dq/hw/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8449/47)

FLIRT, destroyer, 1 June 1916, Dover Straits - C-class, 440t, 1-12pdr/5-6pdr/2-18in tt, Dover Patrol. Three officers including the CO, Lt A Swainson and 3 ratings drowned, perhaps night of 1st/2nd, incident not known, Lt Swainson buried at Bexhill, Surrey. Note: new CO Lt R Kellett appointed on 5 June 1916 (D/dk/dp/dq)

FLY, whaler – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign

FLYCATCHER, ex-Turkish motor patrol boat – see BUTTERFLY, gunboat, 4 January 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

FLYING FALCON, Admiralty rescue tug, 1 September 1917, North Channel - 184grt, built 1904, Glasgow-reg, Clyde Shipping, hired 30/6/17, Pendant No.W.27, probably commissioned, despatched from Lough Swilly to join escort of inbound convoy, now heading back in heavy seas. Tow ropes swept over the stern and fouled propeller, drifted towards island of Islay, anchors let go but cables snapped, driven up sandy beach at Machrie Bay on south of island (not Machir Bay on the west) and sank into sand; three crew drowned trying to launch a boat. Casualty list dates the death of the three crew as 27 September 1917. Salvaged two years later, sold back to owners, hire continued to 1920 (Lr/Mn/C/D/dk/tu)

FLYING SPRAY, rescue tug – see RAVENSTONE, possibly Q-ship, 21 May 1917, believed Atlantic

FORELAND, Admiralty chartered collier, 12 February 1917, North Sea - 1,960grt, built 1914, Shipping & Coal Co, London-reg, Mr W Lloyd, sailing Blyth for Devonport with coal. Mined, laid by UC.11 (Benno von Ditfurth), sank 6 miles S3/4W of Shipwash LV, off Orford Ness, Suffolk (L - 6 miles S of; te - 6 miles S1/4W of, in 51.56N, 01.40E; wi - 6 miles S of, in 51.57N, 01.41.15E) (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

FORNEBO, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 17 June 1917, Atlantic off N Scotland - 4,259grt, built 1906, London-reg, Fornebo SS, armed (sl - Admiralty oiler No.148, presumably Y7.148), Mr W Barnes, Port Arthur for UK with fuel oil. Torpedoed by U.78 (Otto Dröscher), sank 4 miles N of Cape Wrath (wi - in 58.41.30N, 05.01.30W) (H/L/Lr/wi/sl/te/un)

FORTUNE, destroyer – see KING EDWARD VII, predreadnought, 6 January 1916, Atlantic N of Scotland

FORWARD III, hired drifter, 31 March 1917, North Sea - 89grt, built 1907, Banff-reg BF624, Alexander Bruce, hired 3/15 (un – as net barrier tender), 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.2298, Skipper James Mitchell RNR. With division of six drifters sailing from Harwich at daylight to sweep and patrol near Sunk buoy. Mined at 1320, laid by UC.6 (Werner von Zerboni di Sposetti) some days earlier, exploded under keel amidships off the Shipwash, off Orford Ness, Suffolk (He/wi - in 51.58.20N, 01.47.30E), vanished in smoke and water with nothing left; Skipper, 9 ratings lost, no survivors (H/L/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3229)

FOYLE, destroyer, 15 March 1917, English Channel - E-class, c550t, 1903, 4-12pdr/2-18in tt, 25kts, 70 crew, Pendant No.D.20 from 9/15, Dover Patrol, but on patrol in Western Channel, Lt-Cdr Frederick Thompson RNR. Mined at 0405, laid by UC.68 (Hans Degetau) in 50.11N, 03.58W, bow blown off forward of bridge, stern taken in tow at first light for Plymouth, became unstable and foundered at 1500 in 50.16N, 04.10W where wreck has been located (He – off the Mewstone, a few miles from Plymouth; wi - off Dover, in 51.07N, 01.27E; un – the Dover location is wrong); 30 ratings lost (He/un – 28 crew lost) (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk/dq/un/wi; ADM.137/389)

FRANK, hired tug – see THAMES (3), Admiralty screw tug, 16 February 1918, North Sea

FREUCHNY, hired drifter, 8 January 1916, Adriatic Sea - Italian transport Citta di Palermo carrying troops including about 150 British, mined 10 miles off Brindisi, 21 hired drifters steamed into the area and picked up about 100 survivors, two drifters ran onto mines and blew up, the remainder continued the rescue work. According to Uboat.net, UC.14 laid the minefield, but Caser Bauer, who was in command until the 6th laid the mines that sank the two drifters and Franz Becker (in command from the 7th), the mines that accounted for Citta di Palermo. As Bauer went on to command UB.46 from the 12 June 1916, it can perhaps be conjectured that he fell ill:

FREUCHNY (L - Frenchny; C - Freunchy), 84grt, built 1908, Buckie-reg BCK.29, hired 4/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2506, Skipper Joseph Cowie RNR. Skipper and 7 ratings lost, just one survivor. Note: Freuchny Road is in Buckie and is presumably the correct spelling (H/L/Mn/C/D/He/ap/dk/un; ADM.137/3162; Caualty list);

MORNING STAR, hired drifter, 8 January 1916, Adriatic Sea - 97grt, Fraserburgh-reg FR.237, hired 2/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2286, Skipper Peter Buchan RNR. Skipper, 8 ratings lost, all hands (H/L/Mn/C/D/He/ap/dk/un; ADM.137/3162; Casualty list). The Hepper account is different. In this the group of drifters sailed from Brindisi at 0730 for their Otranto Barrage station. As they cleared the harbour, the Italian steamer Brindisi was mined and started sinking, the drifters went to her aid, and first Freunchy and then Morning Star were mined, both due to UC.14. No mention is made of Italian transport Citta di Palermo (He)

FRIGATE BIRD, hired drifter, 11 March 1918, Central Mediterranean - 84grt, built 1905, Buckie-reg BCK68, hired 1916 (D - 2/15) as net drifter, 1-57mm, Admiralty No.2276. Skipper Frederick Hayhoe RNR. In collision with SS Theseus, sank off Marsa Scirocco, Malta; 1 officer, 8 ratings lost (He – skipper and 7 crew) (H/C/D/He/dk; ADM.1/8496/190, ADM.1/8518/83)

FROSTAXE Admiralty trawler, 29 April 1919, English Channel - In collision with Greek merchant ship Epiros and sunk off Newhaven. Epiros lowered boat to pick up survivors; 9 lives lost, 11 survivors (He – 7 survivors) (D/He/dk)

FURIOUS, aircraft carrier, 2 August 1917, British waters - First deck landing on a moving ship was made by Sqdn-Cdr Dunning on Furious flying a Sopwith Pup. He was killed on the 7th in a later attempt (dx)


G

G.8, submarine, 14 January 1918, North Sea - G-class, c703/837t, 1/5/16, 1-3in AA/1-21in with 2 torpedoes/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 14/9kts, 30 crew, Pendant No.I.OC, believed Tees-based 10th Flotilla, Lt John Tryon, sailed for North Sea Patrol, failed to return on 14th, “overdue, presumed lost”. Probably by 14th - Lost, cause unknown, possibly mined or accident; 3 officers, 29 ratings lost (ke - 30 lost), Commonwealth War Graves Commission dates casualty losses on 3 January, possibly G.8's departure date (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/ke/on)

G.9, submarine – see NOBLE, destroyer, 4 August 1916, North Sea

G.9, submarine, 16 September 1917, North Sea - G-class, 703t/837t, 15/6/16, 1-3in AA/1-21in with 2 torpedoes/4-18in tt with 8 torpedoes, 14/9kts, 30 crew, Pennant No.I.1C, possibly Grand Fleet-based 11th Flotilla, Lt-Cdr Hon Byron Cary, sailed from Scapa Flow on 9th for patrol off Norwegian North Sea coast, warned of U-boat in area also that a convoy would be passing through. Made submerged attack just after midnight on what was thought to be a German warship, in fact a British destroyer (He – confirmed as Pasley; J/C/D - Petard; bw/dx/ke - Pasley, both Grand Fleet ships) escorting a Scandinavian convoy to Lerwick, one torpedo hit amidships and failed to explode, the other missed astern, the destroyer in turn assumed the attacker was a German U-boat and rammed just before the conning tower, sinking her in about 30sec even though at the last minute it was realised she was British; 4 officers, 29 ratings lost (bw - 30 lost), one survivor, Stoker William Drake was picked up. Collision damage to destroyer not known, however Petard joined 1st LCS at Rosyth a month later on 17/10/17 (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/ke; ADM.137/3709)

G.13, submarine, 10 March 1917, Atlantic - UC.43 sunk by G.13 in off N Shetlands (dx)

G.S.P., hired drifter, 2 February 1917, English Channel - 100grt, built 1916, Yarmouth-reg YH487, hired 1917 (D - 12/16) as net drifter, Admiralty No.2989. Based at Poole, Dorset. In collision with new destroyer Radiant then carrying out builder's speed trials, sank 6 miles south of Owers LV, SE of Selsey Bill; 5 ratings lost, 4 survived (+C/D/dk; ADM.137/355)

GADFLY [01], river gunboat – see BUTTERFLY, river gunboat, 4 January 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

GADFLY [02], river gunboat, 14 January 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign - Fly-class, in service late 1915, 98t, 1-4in/1-12pdr/1-6pdr/1-3pdr AA/1-2pdr/4mg, during the first attempt to relieve Kut, the British flotilla reconnoitred Turkish positions, Gadfly carrying the Senior Naval Officer. Hit by 4.8in shell; no lives lost. Sent south to Abadan for repairs (Rn/Cn/D/dk)

GADFLY [03], river gunboat - see MANTIS, river gunboat, 24 February 1917, Mesopotamian Front

GADFLY [04], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 26 February 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

GADFLY [05], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

GAELIC, Q-ship, 22 April 1917, Bristol Channel - Q.22. Damaged in action with UC.57 (Paul Hundius) off Minehead, Somerset; two crew killed (D/dk/un)

GAFSA, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 28 March 1917, Atlantic off S Ireland - 3,974grt, built 1902, London-reg, English & American Shipping, 1-12pdr, 39 crew, Port Arthur for Queenstown with 4,900t fuel oil for orders, escorted by warship. Torpedoed by U.57 (Carl-Siegfried Ritter von Georg), possibly hit twice in engine-room at 1715, sank quickly 10 miles SE1/2S of Kinsale Head, Co Cork (L - 8 miles S by E of; te - in 51.31N, 08.18W); seven engine-room crew killed by explosion, survivors got away in two boats, picked up by escort, landed at Queenstown (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

GALATEA [01], light cruiser, 4 May 1916, North Sea - Light cruisers Galatea and Phaeton damaged German Navy airship L.7 (Production No. LZ.32) with gunfire in the North Sea, south of Horns Reef LV, submarine E.31 finished her off and rescued survivors (dx)

GALATEA [02], light cruiser, 10 December 1918, North Sea - Arethusa-class, 3,500t. In collision with and sank SS MOTO 1,941grt off Amble, near Coquet Island (ms – 20 miles N of the Tyne) (gr/ms/wi)

GAMBRI, hired trawler, 18 January 1918, English Channel - 274grt, built 1916, Grant & Baker, Grimsby-reg GY992, hired 4/17 as minesweeper (wi - as patrol vessel), 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.1263, Chief Skipper George Bee RNR. Mined at 1015, laid by UC.71 (Ernst Steindorff) that day, sank off Royal Sovereign Light Vessel, off Beachy Head, near Eastbourne (He/un – 3/4 mile off Royal Sovereign LV; un – also SE of Isle of Wight; wi - “adjacent to” or 1/4 m E by S of, in 50.43.23N, 00.26.32E); Skipper, 1 officer and 20 ratings lost (He/un – 21 men lost) (H/L/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.1/8512/27)

GARFIELD, Admiralty chartered collier, 15 January 1917, Eastern Mediterranean - 3,838grt, built 1907, Newcastle-reg, Northern Petroleum Tank SS, armed, Barry/Malta for Port Said with coal. Torpedoed by U.39 (Walter Forstmann), sank 60 miles NE by N1/2N of Alexandria; master taken prisoner (+L/Lr/te/un)

GARLAND, destroyer – see AUSTRALIA, battlecruiser, 22 April 1916, North Sea

GARRIGIL, drifter – see QUARRIE KNOWE, drifter, 4 August 1916, Adriatic

GARTLAND, Admiralty collier, 3 January 1918, English Channel - 2,613grt, built 1892, Gart SS Co (Whimster & Co), Glasgow, 1 -3in HA, 27 crew, Mr J Geddes, Newcastle for Gibraltar with coal. Torpedoed by UB.30 (Wilhelm Rhein) port-side abreast the engine-room at 0315, ship abandoned, seen to sink at 0325, 5 miles ESE of Owers LV, off Sussex (wi - in 50.37N, 00.34.30W); two crew killed by torpedo explosion, survivors picked up by SS Numima, landed at St Helen's, IoW (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

GASCONIA, Admiralty chartered collier, 16 November 1917, Western Mediterranean - 3,801grt, built 1915, Gascony SS Co, Liverpool, armed, sailing Barry for Malta with coal and government stores. Torpedoed by U.63 (Otto Schultze), sank 12 miles NE1/2E of Shershel/Cape Cherchell, W of Algiers; three crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

GENA, Admiralty chartered collier, 1 May 1917, North Sea - 2,784grt, built 1893, Whitby-reg, Thomas Turnbull, 1-15pdr, 26 crew, Mr W Peguiro, sailing from Tyne with coal under sealed orders, pilot on board. Two German seaplanes sighted low down and approaching fast from the east, one dropped a torpedo which hit at 0545, sank rapidly 3/4m S by W1/2W of 'A' War Channel Buoy, off Southwold, Suffolk (wi – 3/4m S by W of, in 52.11.28N, 01.46.10E); survivors picked up by patrol vessel and landed at Lowestoft. Wreck Index reports that one of the seaplanes was shot down by the ship’s gunners and the flight crew taken prisoner by a patrol vessel (H/L/Lr/wi)

GENERAL CRAUFORD, monitor – see BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits

GENTIAN, fleet sweeping sloop, 30 May 1916, North Sea – one of t wo warships attacked by German U-boats deployed in support of the High Seas Fleet operation leading to the Battle of Jutland. Apart from these two attacks the U-boats played no part in Jutland; GENTIAN, Arabis-class, Grand Fleet sweeping flotilla, with other minesweepers. Attacked (Rn - by U.43; ju - only U.41 and U.44 on patrol off Pentland firth) about 40 miles due E of Pentland Firth early in the afternoon, avoided the torpedo (Rn/D/gf/ja/ju/kt); TRIDENT, destroyer, Talisman-class, attendant destroyer, Blyth-based 11th Submarine Flotilla. Attacked by U.63 off the Firth of Forth, avoided the torpedo (D/ja/gf/kt)

GEORGE MILBURN, hired trawler, 12 July 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 235grt, built 1916, Aberdeen-reg A634, R Irvin & Sons, hired 7/16 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.3301, Skipper W Cowling (He - Skipper George Henry Lucas RNR. Note: Skipper Lucas included in casualty list, but not Skipper Cowling). Sailing Queenstown (Cobh) for Conningbeg and return, escorting oiler Wylie as far as Conningbeg, relief escort failed to turn up and proceeded together. Seen to blow up around 1 1/2m S of Dunmore Naval Station around 1740, mined amidships, laid by UC.42 (Otto Heinrich Tornow) on 14 June and sank (wi - between 1/4 & 1 1/2 miles off Dunmore, Co Waterford, in 52.09.20N, 06.58.45W; un – 1 1/2 miles off); 1 officer, 10 ratings lost, only survivor was Trimmer Davies RNR, on deck at the time who found himself in the sea, clambered onto the ship’s upturned small boat which had floated off, picked up about 15min later by Waterford-reg fishing boat W.229. A leading seaman with a head wound also got on the boat but slid off and drowned. Note: Court of Enquiry held on board HMS Colleen, Queenstown on the 30th (H/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/3265)

GERMAN DESTROYER RAID ON DOVER STRAITS, 23 November 1916 - Thirteen German destroyers of 9th TBF plus Flanders Half Flotilla sailed to attack the northern entrance to The Downs, arrived off North Foreland at 2100 then steamed at slow speed for the anchorage. Acceptable, one of 12 vessels of the 2nd Division, Ramsgate drifters was on patrol near Broadstairs and at 2250 sighted six destroyers passing under her stern only 150yds away, failed to realise they were German. As the last ship passed, Acceptable and nearby Buckler came under fire, the alarm was raised, the three destroyers guarding The Downs slipped, but by this time, after firing a few rounds at Margate, the Germans had gone:

ACCEPTABLE, hired drifter, 82grt, built 1911, Lowestoft-reg, hired 12/14, 1-6pdr, Sub-Lt W FitzGerald RNR. Steamed clear but badly hit above deck; no casualties listed (Rn/Mn/D/ap/dk)

GERMAN DESTROYER RAID ON DOVER STRAITS, 25 February 1917 - Another raid was launched from Zeebrugge, but this time Dover Patrol had far more forces at its command, and the barrage was now marked by five large lighted buoys with a destroyer stationed off each at night, instead of the defenceless drifters. German 6th TBF headed for the barrage but was thwarted about 2230 by the rapid gunfire of Laverock stationed near No.11A Buoy. Half an hour later Ramsgate drifter John Lincoln on patrol at the northern end of a drifter patrol line from North Foreland to the North Goodwins sighted three destroyers of the 1st "Zeebrugge" Half-Flotilla steering north along the coast, was fired on and sent up signal rockets. The German ships briefly shelled the wireless station at North Foreland and bombarded Margate and nearby Westgate before heading back for Zeebrugge.

GERMAN DESTROYER RAID ON RAMSGATE, KENT, 26 April 1917 - night of 26th/27th, 2 killed in the town, monitor Marshal Ney and torpedo boat TB.4 present. No more destroyer raids in Dover Straits until February 1918, although aircraft attacked drifters and buoys (dx)

GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea - The German High Seas Fleet was expected to make a demonstration in the North Sea, possibly in support of the Irish Easter Rising which broke out on the 24th. Grand Fleet was ordered out, together with Harwich Force which included 5th LCS Conquest (broad pendant, Cdre Tyrwhitt), Cleopatra and Penelope, leader Lightfoot with 7 destroyers, followed by leader Nimrod with 8 more, then by two divisions of L-class destroyers operating with Dover Patrol. Sailing on the night of 24th/25th, Harwich Force ran up the East coast while destroyer Melampus with six Yarmouth-based submarines positioned them first between Southwold and the Hook of Holland, then in a more northerly position. The German 1st SG, less Seydlitz which struck a mine that morning, was sailing to bombard Lowestoft and Yarmouth. Harwich Force sighted the Germans about 0350 and tried to induce them to chase south, but instead Lowestoft was badly shelled around 0410. The 1st SG then headed north for Yarmouth, Harwich Force followed and probably helped save Yarmouth from a full half hour battlecruiser bombardment. Tyrwhitt opened fire on the German light cruisers at 0430, the battlecruisers stopped bombarding to support their cruisers, and were sighted at 0445, following which Tyrwhitt turned south and came under heavy, accurate fire. Cruiser Conquest, now at the rear of 5th LCS line was severely punished and destroyer Laertes damaged. The Germans now headed back home, their retirement covered by Flanders-based U-boats including UB.18 and UB.29 off Lowestoft/Yarmouth. Adm Beatty's battlecruisers, Harwich Force and the submarines continued to search and seek action, then as Harwich Force returned home after recall, Penelope was torpedoed just before 1000 and patrolling submarine E.22 sunk around 1145:

CONQUEST, light cruiser, Caroline-class, 4,730t, 2-6in/8-4in/1-13pdr AA/4-3pdr/4-21in tt, flagship 5th LCS Harwich Force. Within five minutes of coming under German battlecruiser fire sometime after 0445, hit on the superstructure by a 12in salvo and badly damaged; 1 officer and 22 ratings killed. Cdre Trywhitt completed emergency repairs by 0540 and continued in action (Rn/Cn/D/dk/ty);

LAERTES, destroyer, L-class, c1,300t, 3-4in/1mg/4-21in tt, 3rd DF Harwich Force. Also hit in the battlecruiser action which lasted 13min, boiler out of action; five men wounded (Rn/Cn/ty);

PENELOPE, light cruiser, Arethusa-class, 4,400t, 2-6in/6-4in/1-3pdr/4-21in tt, 5th LCS Harwich Force. Cdr Tyrwhitt continued NE in pursuit with his light cruisers in line abreast, passed UB.18 at 0635, and at 0830 after a three hour chase spotted enemy smoke ahead, ten minutes later came the recall which he had to obey. Just before 1000 on the run back, Penelope was torpedoed by UB.29 (Herbert Pustkuchen) stationed off Lowestoft, rudder blown away and steering gear wrecked, still able to steam at 20kts. Reached Harwich by 1500 (Rn/Cn/D/ge/ty/un);

E.22, submarine, E-class, 662/667t, 27/8/15, 1-12pdr/5-18in tt with 10 torpedoes, 15/9kts, 30 crew, Pendant No.I.79, believed Harwich-based 8th Flotilla, Lt Reginald Dimsdale, on the new patrol line set by Melampus between 0500 and 0600, also described as one of four submarines steaming on the surface, one mile apart at 12kts, E.22 in the lead. First torpedo fired by UB.18 (Otto Steinbrinck), one of the Flanders Flotilla boats covering the return of the German battlecruisers, but missed and E.22 turned towards her attacker, UB.18 dived under E.22 scrapping her hull as she did so, then fired again at 1145 and this time hit; 3 officers, 28 ratings lost, two crew escaped, one of them, an ERA stayed afloat on the wreckage of a wooden aircraft platform from E.22, both picked up when UB.18 surfaced 90 minutes later, landed at Zeebrugge next day, taken to Bruges for questioning (H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He*/bw/dk/dx/ke/on/un);

A number of other vessels were sunk or damaged at the time, either by the German warships at sea or during the bombardment of Lowestoft, including:

KING STEPHEN, aka Ledger No. 778, Q-ship/special service ship, trawler, 162grt, built 1900, Grimsby-reg GY1174, Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, hired 1915 (D/qs - 2/16) as decoy ship, Skipper Thomas Philips RNR. On patrol off the Norfolk coast, reportedly sunk by submarine (C only - by German destroyer G.41, as destroyers accompanied the German battlecruiser force, her loss to a destroyer is quite likely. Confirmed by Hepper); no lives lost . Loss only known when crew were reported as prisoners of war (H/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dk/qs; ADM.1/8455/95, ADM.137/2237);

MOSS, hired drifter, 99grt, built 1911, Yarmouth-reg, hired 9/14 as patrol vessel, 1-3pdr, Skipper Percy Shreeve. Damaged during Lowestoft bombardment; Skipper and 5 ratings lost (D/dk)

GHURKA, destroyer, 8 February 1917, English Channel - original spelling but often spelt Gurkha, F-class, 872t, 1907, 3-12pdr/2-18in tt, 33kts, c68 crew, Pendant No.D.04, 6th DF Dover Patrol, Lt-Cdr Harold Woolcombe-Boyce, proceeding southeast, "just to the westward off Dungeness in a fierce gale at night". Mined amidships at 1945, laid by UC.47 (Paul Hundius) the day before, flooded and broke in two, sank 4 miles SE off Dungeness buoy (dx - SW of; ke - SE of); 75 lost - CO, 4 officers and 70 ratings, nearly all on board, 5 survivors, covered in oil, were rescued by Admiralty trawler Highlander. Lt-Cdr Francis Lewin, 6th Flotilla's gunnery officer kept one man alive until rescue and received two humane awards (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dx/dp/dq/dk/ke/un; ADM.137/3245)

GIRL EVA, hired drifter, 2 October 1916, North Sea - 76grt, built 1913, Yarmouth-reg YH346, hired 7/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2201, Dover Patrol, Skipper George Pulford RNR. (un – 30 September) - Mined, laid by UC.6 (Paul Gunther), sank off Elbow Light Buoy (wi - near Elbow buoy, St. Andrews Bay, River Tay estuary, in 56.27N, 02.40W); Skipper and 6 ratings lost, four survivors. Note: if HMS Girl Eva was serving with Dover Patrol, location is more likely to be the Elbow Buoy off North Foreland, Kent. Confirmed by Hepper as Elbow light buoy, off Broadstairs, in51.24.20N 01.35E (H/L/C/D/He/dk/dq/un/wi; ADM.137/282; ADM.1/8468/227)

GISELLA, Admiralty chartered collier, 18 November 1917, St George's Channel - 2,502grt, built 1904, SS Mary Co, London, armed, Mr E Bisset, sailing from Cardiff with coal. Torpedoed by UC.77 (Reinhard von Rabenau), sank 2 miles SW by S of Skokham island, off Milford Haven (L/wi - also 6 miles W of St Ann's Head, in 51.41.15N, 05.20.30W); two crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

GLEN, Q-ship, 20 April 1917, English Channel – auxiliary schooner, 113grt, damaged by gunfire by UC.16 (Egon von Werner); no lives lost (D/dk/un)

GLENBOYNE, hired trawler, 4 January 1919, Dover Straits area - 224grt, built 1915, Glasgow-reg GW10, hired 9/15, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.289, Skipper James Barron RNR. Post-war mine clearance, clearing a minefield about 6 miles off Folkestone. (wi - 14th) – Detonated drifting mine, broke up and sank in under a minute off North Foreland, Kent (wi - 6 miles E by S of Folkestone Pier, in 51.02.55N, 01.21.50E; He – in 51.02.50N, 01.21.45E); 2 ratings killed (C/D/He/dk/ge/wi; ADM.116/2062)

GLENOGIL, hired trawler, 3 May 1917, Shetlands - (gr - Glenogle), 1902, 203grt, Glasgow-reg, hired 8/15 as BDV. Collided with and holed SS St Clair in the bows off Busta/Basta Voe, island of Yell (D/gr)

GLOCLIFFE, Admiralty chartered collier, 19 August 1917, English Channel - 2,211grt, built 1915, Globe Shipping Co (Humphries, Cardiff, 1-12pdr, 22 crew, Mr R Evans, Barry Dock for Southampton with 3,300t coal, steaming at 9kts. Torpedoed by UB.40 (Hans Howaldt) in boiler-room at 1420, abandoned at 1430 and sank at 1605, 9 miles ENE of Berry Head, Devon (te/un/wi - in 50.29.25N, 03.17.55W; wi - also quotes 50.27.05N, 03.17.17W); two firemen killed by torpedo explosion, survivors picked up by patrol vessel and landed at Torquay. Wreck lies in 125ft with stern gun still mounted (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

GLORY, battleship, 7 March 1918, Russian Intervention - Allied Naval operations in North Russia started against the Bolsheviks in Murmansk and Archangel areas, British pre-dreadnought Glory, armoured cruiser Cochrane, scout cruiser Attentive, seaplane carrier Nairana took part (dx)

GLOWWORM, river gunboat, 24 August 1919, North Russia - Insect-class, 645t, 5/2/16, 2-6in/2-12pdr, Cdr Sebald Green, also flotilla commander, on River Dvina. Went to assistance of burning wooden barge moored along river bank, laden with explosives but no warning signs displayed, came alongside and barge blew up, Glowworm severely damaged; 1 officer, 18 ratings killed, Cdr Green and another rating DOW (gs - 42 killed & wounded) (D/dk/gb/gs)

GOISSA, hired yacht, 25 April 1916, North Sea - 882grt, built 1893, hired 19/2/16, presumably serving with Auxiliary Patrol in Home Waters. In collision with battlecruiser Invincible (dx - one man lost in Invincible) returning with the Grand Fleet following sweep against German fleet, "bow of Goissa broke off and was embedded in the starboard quarter of Invincible"; 2 ratings, 2 MN lost. See also GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea (D/dk/www)

GOLDEN SUNSET, hired drifter, 4 January 1918, English Channel - 85grt, built 1913, Lowestoft-reg LT1194, Frederick Offord, hired 10/15 as net drifter, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.1914. In collision with armed trawler Touraco which was escorting a coastal convoy, sank off Shambles Bank LV, off Portland Bill, Dorset (He - in 50.31N 02.18W; wi - in 50.32N, 02.18W); no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/682)

GOLDMOUTH, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 31 March 1916, Atlantic off NW France - 7,446grt, built 1903, London-reg, Anglo-Saxon Petroleum, armed, Tarakan/Dakar for Falmouth with fuel oil. Captured by U.44 (Paul Wagenführ), sunk by torpedo 60 miles WNW of Ushant island, off NW Brittany (L - 60 miles NNW of); master taken prisoner (H/L/Lr/Mn/sl/te/un)

GOODWOOD, paddle minesweeper, 1 January 1917, Dover Straits - Merchant ship damaged by British anti-submarine mined nets off Calais (L - 4 miles N of Gravelines; sc - near West Dyck shoal), Dover Patrol paddle minesweepers went to her assistance but Goodwood was also mined in the nets, Ascot-class, 810t. Left in sinking condition, towed by sister-ship Redcar to Dunkirk, handed over to salvage tugs, put into dry-dock (D/dq/sc)

GORSEMORE, Admiralty chartered collier, 22 September 1918, Central Mediterranean - 3,079grt, built 1899, Liverpool-reg, Johnston Line, armed, Barry for Taranto with coal. Torpedoed by UC.53 (Erich Gerth), sank 44 miles SE1/2E of Cape Colonne, Calabria (L/te - in 38.40N, 18E; un – 38.28N, 17.51E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

GOSHAWK, destroyer, 4 May 1916, North Sea - Sopwith Baby (Admiralty 8200 Type) tractor biplane seaplane from seaplane carrier Vindex, crashed into mast of Goshawk in North Sea off Schleswig-Holstein. Flight Lieutenant Oswald Walmesley RNAS drowned (dk)

GOWAN LEA, hired drifter, 22 December 1916, Adriatic Sea - (D - Gowanlea), 84grt, built 1914, Fraserburgh-reg, hired 1/15, 1-6pdr, and Our Allies, 1915, 91grt, Lowestoft-reg, hired 8/15, 1-57mm, both net drifters, on Otranto Straits net line. Raid by four Austrian destroyers about 2130, both vessels shelled, Gowan Lea hit several times and damaged, attack broken off when six French destroyers sailing Brindisi for Taranto came up; no casualties (Rn/Mn/D/ap/nw)

GRACIE, hired drifter, 10 February 1917, North Sea - 83grt, built 1907, Banff-reg BF973, hired 8/15 as net drifter, 16pdr AA, Admiralty No.3212, Dover Patrol, Skipper John Jarmson RNR. In collision with hired drifter Kitty George, sank 2 miles NE of Tongue LV, N of North Foreland, Kent (He – in 51.30.30N, 01.23.30E); no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk/dq; ADM.137/357)

GRAFTON, cruiser, 11 June 1917, Palestine Campaign - "blistered" cruiser, ex-1st class protected cruiser, Edgar-class, 7,350t, 2-9.2in/10-6in, rearmed and bulged for Mediterranean service mid-1915, part of Anglo-French naval force supporting British advance in Palestine. (ge/un - 10th) - Torpedoed and damaged by UB.43 (Horst Obermüller) 150 miles E of Malta, to Malta for repairs, returned to Aegean until 1918 (Cn/D/ge/un)

GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign - Royal Navy forces began bombardment of Gaza coast. Ships taking part included bulged old cruiser Grafton, monitors M.15, M.29, M.31, M.32, Raglan, river gunboats Aphis, Ladybird, destroyers Comet, Staunch, kite balloon ship City of Oxford. Ended on 11/11/17 with loss of M.15 and Staunch (dx)

GRATEFUL, hired drifter, 25 March 1916, North Channel - 107grt, built 1907, Inverness-reg INS322, hired 2/15 as net drifter, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.2399, 9 crew, Skipper W Ralph (He - Skipper John Reaich RNR), sailing in WNW force 8 gale and snow storm. Driven ashore 100yds from Lloyd's Signal Station, Torr Head, Co Antrim (wi - in 55.11.50N, 06.03.45W); Coastguard called Portrush RNLI, but coxswain “reluctant to leave the harbour in such heavy seas”, later launched with another coxswain and volunteers from Portstewart as well as Portrush, reached the scene at 0900, but all crew already rescued by breeches buoy three hours before. Salvaged, served in WW2 (H/C/D/He/dk/wi)

GREAVESASH, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 February 1918, English Channel - 1,263grt, built 1917, Newbigin SS Co, Newcastle-reg, armed, Havre for Barry Roads in ballast. Torpedoed by UB.74, sank 10 miles NE of Cape Barfleur, near Cherbourg (L - 10 miles ENE of); 8 crew lost (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un)

GREENHILL, Admiralty chartered collier, 16 December 1917, North Sea - 1,900grt, built 1901, Cardiff-reg, W J Tillett SS, Blyth/Holmsey for Dunkirk with coal. In collision, sank off Longsands, off Clacton (wi - Stranded, in 51.40N, 01.29E) (H/Lr/wi) RN CAS

GREGYNOG, Admiralty chartered collier, 18 April 1918, Atlantic off SW England - 1,701grt, built 1899, Sunderland-reg, Lambton & Hetton Collieries, 1-3in HA, crew 22, Mr A Way, Penarth for Portland with 2,400t coal. Torpedoed by UB.86 (Hans Trenk) starboard side at 0800, survivors got away and later questioned, ship sank within 5min, 16 miles off Hartland Point, Devon (L - 3 miles SW of; un – 16m SW of, in 50.47N, 4.44W; wi – 7 1/2m W of Bude Haven, in 50.47N, 04.44.30W); 3 firemen killed in the explosion, 17 survivors escaped in a lifeboat and the master, mate and a boy on a liferaft (un – 3 lives lost). “Wreck Index” lists two more lost - a gunner drowned abandoning the ship and the boy, the remainder were picked up by a French lugger and landed at Padstow (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

GRENVILLE, flotilla leader, 9 February 1918, North Sea - improved Marksman-class, 1,670t, believed leader 15th DF Grand Fleet. In collision with and sank SS Express 331grt in Pentland Skerries (wi - in 58.41.20N, 02.56W), Grenville badly damaged. All 13 crew in Express lost including two RMLI (D/dk/gr/wi)

GREYHOUND [01], destroyer, 25 March 1916, English Channel - C-class, 430t, sent out with other Dover Patrol destroyers to assist SS Sussex torpedoed on 24th, nine crew survivors made for Colbart LV. Greyhound went to bring them back early next morning on 25th, torpedo passed 6ft ahead of her (Rn/Cn/dp)

GREYHOUND [02], destroyer, 14 January 1917, Dover Straits - C-class, c375t, Dover Patrol. Accidentally rammed and sank French trawler Sainte Pierre III of Gravelines (D/dq/gr)

GRILSE (RCN), torpedo boat, 12 December 1916, Canadian waters – American ex-yacht Winchester, 287grt, built 1912, bought 6/15, armed with 212pdr, 114 in tt and commissioned as torpedo boat, unsuited for winter service and sent to Caribbean. Sailed from Halifax on 11th and reported lost in storm, during which time six crew members were lost and drowned, Turned up at Sherburne, Nova Scotia three days later (D/dx)

GROESWEN, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 November 1917, North Sea - 3,570grt, built 1900, W & C T Jones SS Co, Cardiff, armed, Mr F Jones, Hull for Spezia with coal. Mined, laid by UC.11 (Ferdinand Schwartz), sank 3 miles NE1/2E of Sunk LV, off Harwich (L/wi - about 3 1/2m NE1/2E of, in 51.53.10N, 01.37.50E; te/un - in 51.55N, 01.40E) (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)


H

H.3, submarine, 15 July 1916, Adriatic Sea - H-class, 364/434t, completed 3/6/15, 4-18in tt with 6 torpedoes, 13/11kts, 22 crew, to Mediterranean 1915, Lt George Jenkinson, on patrol off Cattaro (Kotor) naval base for Austrian and German U-boats and in advanced defence of the anti-U-boat Otranto Barrage, close inshore submerged during the day, withdrew at night to recharge batteries on the surface, “overdue, presumed lost”. Cause of loss originally unknown, but Austrian coast-watchers sighted a submarine that morning and in the afternoon others on Punta d'Ostro outside Cattaro reported an underwater explosion in a defensive minefield, probably H.3; 3 officers, 19 ratings lost, small boats reportedly recovered British submarine parts (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/dx/ke/md/on/wi)

H.5 [01], submarine – see E.5, submarine, 7 March 1916, North Sea

H.5, [02] submarine, 14 July 1916, North Sea - U.51 torpedoed and sunk by H.5 off Ems estuary, Germany (dx)

H.8, submarine, 22 March 1916, North Sea - H-class, 364/434t, completed by 6/15, Yarmouth-based 8th Flotilla, Canadian Lt B Johnson RNR, on patrol off Dutch coast. Snagged cable of drifting British mine, exploded and severely damaged, sank rapidly in 80ft of water, leaking badly, managed to surface and limp home (Cn/D/on/www)

H.10, submarine, 19 January 1918, North Sea - H-class, 364/434t, completed by 6/15, 4-18in tt with 6 torpedoes, 13/11kts, c22 crew, Yarmouth-based 8th Flotilla, Lt Martin Collier, failed to return from North Sea patrol on 19th, “overdue, presumed lost”. Probably before 19th (bw - before 20th) - Lost, cause unknown, possibly mined or accident; 4 officers, 22 ratings lost (ke - 20 lost) (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/bw/dk/ke/on)

HALCYON, minesweeper, 29 July 1917, North Sea - ex-Dryad-class-torpedo gunboat, 1,070t, originally 2-4.7in/3-18in tt, based at Lowestoft, on patrol in Smith’s Knoll Buoy area. Sighted periscope of UB.27, sunk her after ramming and dropping two depth-charges, in 52.47N, 02.24E (un – claimed place and cause of loss is not consistent with UB.27's orders) (Cn/D/ub/un)

HALDON, paddle minesweeper, 7 August 1917, British Isles – As of 30 June 1917 serving with Queenstown (Cobh) minesweepers, mined and damaged; one crew killed (dk/pl)

HALIFAX HARBOUR EXPLOSION, 6 December 1917 - Catastrophic explosion took place in Halifax harbour, Nova Scotia when French ammunition ship SS Mont Blanc was in collision with Norwegian steamer Imo. An estimated 10,000 people were killed, 22,000 made homeless. Amongst the vessels damaged were five British steamships and a number of naval ships: 

HIGHFLYER, old light cruiser; 9 crew killed (dk)

MARGARET (RCN), patrol vessel, Canadian waters; one PO killed (dk)

MUSQUASH (RCN), armed patrol vessel, ex-tug, 198grt, built 1910, 1-3pdr, serving in Canadian waters. Set on fire and adrift, L/S Davis and an AB from old light cruiser Highflyer were taken across to Musquash and helped save her, partly by disposing of burning ammunition; Leading Seaman Thomas Neil Davis RNR was awarded the Albert Medal 1st Class or in Gold, later George Cross; 5 crew killed (D/dk/dx/gc)

NIOBE (RCN), armoured or ex-1st-class cruiser, Diadem-class, 11,000t, paid off at Halifax 10/15, disarmed for harbour service as depot ship. Superstructure wrecked and lost funnels, ventilators and masts, continued in service until 1922; 16 crew killed (Cn/D/dk/gr)

HAMPSHIRE, cruiser, 5 June 1916, Orkneys - Devonshire-class, 10,850t, 1903, 4-7.5in/6-6in/2-12pdr/20-3pdr/2-18in tt, 22kts, c655 crew, 2nd CS Grand Fleet, Pendant No.50, Capt Herbert Savill, took part in Battle of Jutland, only a few days later carrying Lord Kitchener to Archangel as head of a military and financial mission to Russia. Kitchener arrived at Scapa on the 5th, lunched with Adm Jellicoe and in the afternoon went on board Hampshire, weather extremely bad with NE gale blowing, decision taken to sail up the west side of the Orkneys which was believed to be clear of mines and U-boats, and where escorting destroyers would be able to maintain station. Sailed at 1645, met by destroyers Unity and Victor off Tor Ness, wind backed and escorts sent back, Hampshire reduced speed and drove ahead into heavy seas with 50kt winds. Three hours after clearing Hoxa Gate, mined in a field laid by U.75 (Kurt Beitzen) on 28/29 May as a prelude to the Jutland sortie, sinking was witnessed, ship seen 1 1/2m offshore, large column of water rose up her side at 1940, then reportedly another column, turned towards the land but sinking, went down within 15min between Brough of Birsay and Marwick Head, NW Mainland Island (dx/wi - W of Marwick Head; wi - also in 59.07.30N, 03.23W); 723 crew lost - 38 officers, 681 ratings, 4 canteen staff (ke - 650 lost) plus Lord Kitchener and his staff who were allocated a boat, three rafts with 50-70 men floated clear, just 14 men drifted ashore on a Carley raft but two died before rescue parties could reach them. Nine destroyers went out but only found wreckage and bodies. There were various conspiracy theories about his death but it was simply due to enemy action (H/J/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/dx/gf/ke/ss/un/wi; ADM.137/3621)

HARTLEY, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 January 1918, North Sea - 1,150grt, built 1903, British & African Steam Navigation Co (Elder, Dempster & Co), Newcastle-reg, armed, Mr F Inskip, Boulogne for Tyne in ballast. Torpedoed by UB.34 (Helmuth von Ruckteschell), sank 2 miles NE of Skinningrove, near SaltburnbytheSea, Yorkshire (un – in 54.36N, 00.49W; wi - in 54.35.45N, 00.48W) (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

HAWK, hired trawler – see OKEMENT, Admiralty chartered collier, 17 February 1917, Central Mediterranean

HEATHER, convoy sloop, 21 April 1917, Atlantic SW of Ireland/W of France - aka Bywater, Seetrus, Aubrietia-class built to resemble merchantmen, 1,250t, 2-4in/1-3pdr AA, within decoy organisation as Q.16, 1st Sloop Flotilla, Queenstown, Cdr W Hallwright. Heavily shelled by U.52 (Hans Walther) without warning (un - 300 miles W of Ushant, in 48.30N, 11.30W), panic party left, top-bridge hit and ship badly wrecked, by the time Heather was ready for action the submarine had ceased fire and dived, put back into Queenstown; one casualty - captain killed by shell splinter early in the action (Cn/D/ge/sk/qs/un)

HEATHER, hired trawler, 2 December 1918, Irish Sea - c170grt, built 1904, hired 1917. In collision with and sank wooden ketch JANIE 94grt off the North Wall LH, River Mersey (gr/wi)

HEATHER, sloop – see VALA, Q-ship, 21 August 1917, Atlantic, SW of Scillies

HEATHERSIDE, Admiralty chartered collier, 25 August 1917, off Bay of Biscay - 2,767grt, built 1909, Charlton SS Co, Newcastle, armed, Newport/Milford Haven for Malta with coal. Originally went missing, believed lost, probably by U-boat attack and possibly on the 24th, Lloyds List amended to 25th in 1937. Now confirmed as torpedoed and sunk by U.93 (Helmut Gerlach) NW of Cape Ortegal in 46.14N, 10.57W; all 27 crew lost including master (H/L/Lr/dk/ge/te/un)

HEBBLE, store carrier, 6 May 1917, North Sea - 904grt, built 1891, Goole-reg, Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Co, hired 26/8/14 (C/wi - ammunition carrier; D - store carrier from 3/12/14, boom defence vessel store carrier from 30/4/15, carried Pendant No.Y2.27 as armament carrier and Y3.1594 which would have been as a collier, finally listed as store carrier), Pendant No.Y8.3, 16 crew, Mr Flower, sailing Scapa Flow for Sunderland in ballast (wi - with coal), heading into Sunderland harbour. Mined at 1150, laid by UC.42 (Otto Heinrich Tornow), sank at once 1 1/2m due E of Roker Pier, Sunderland (te/wi - in 54.55.28N 01.18.48W); chief engineer and four crew lost, 11 survivors rescued by motor launch, landed at Sunderland (H/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/te/un/wi)

HEBBURN, Admiralty chartered collier, 25 September 1918, St George's Channel - 1,938grt, built 1908, Newcastle-reg, Burnett SS, armed, Mr H Smith, from Barry with coal, general cargo. Torpedoed by UB.91 (Wolf Hans Hertig), sank 14 miles S of Mine Head, Co Waterford (L - 64 miles WNW of The Smalls; un – in 51.40N, 07.13W; wi - in 51.48N, 07.30W); six crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

HELEN WILSON, Admiralty hired motor drifter, 5 December 1917, off W Scotland - c44grt, built 1902, Peterhead-reg PD.301, hired 4/17, harbour tender or coastal service craft, Admiralty No.1675. Destroyed by accidental fire at Oban, Firth of Lorne, Argyllshire; no lives lost (H/C/D/dk)


HELMUTH, armed tug – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign

HERACLES, hired screw tug – see ENDEAVOUR (2), hired trawler, 10 March 1918, Orkneys.

HERCULANEUM, Admiralty dockyard paddle tug, 17 October 1916, Dover Straits - 378grt, built 1905, bought 1908, Dover-based. Sank in Dover harbour, raised (D/dp/gr)

HERCULES, Admiralty chartered collier, 30 December 1917, North Sea - 1,295grt, built 1909, Shipping Controller (W Coupland & Co), London, Newcastle-reg, 1-12pdr, 20 crew, Mr T Schadberg, Tyne for Newhaven with coal. Torpedoed by UB.21 (Walter Scheffler) port-side amidships at 1550, crew abandoned ship immediately, sank 3 miles ENE of Whitby, Yorkshire (te/un - in 54.32N, 00.39W; wi - 54.10.10N, 00.09.15W); 12 lives lost - the first boat launched capsized drowning the master and 9 men, 2nd officer lowered the dinghy which the ten remaining crew boarded, two men later died of exposure, survivors picked up by fishing vessel and landed at Whitby (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un/wi)

HERCULES III, hired trawler – see MARION, hired trawler, 23 February 1918, Central Mediterranean

HERCULES IV, tug – see ML.357, motor launch, 12 December 1917, English Channel

HERMATRICE, Q-ship, March 1916, Dover Straits - in service as submarine decoy ship, no further information. March - Sunk by U-boat off Boulogne (C only)

HERO, tug, 24 July 1917, probably Dover Straits - 85grt, probably Dover Patrol (D/dp - only lists Hero, Admiralty trawler, 1907, 226grt, Milford-reg, hired 8/14). Damaged in collision, temporary repairs carried out at Dover (D/dp/dq/gr)

HERON BRIDGE, Admiralty chartered collier 16 May 1918, Atlantic off Azores - 2,420grt, built 1918, Liverpool-reg, Sir John Esplen KBE or W Esplen & Son, armed, Penarth for Dakar with coal. Torpedoed by U.62 (Ernst Hashagen), sank 320 miles E by N true of San Miguel, E Azores (L/te/un - in 38.49N, 18.26W); one crew lost (H/L/te/un)

HERRINGTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 4 May 1917, North Sea - 1,258grt, built 1905, Newcastle-reg, Lambton & Hetton Collieries (E T Nisbet), armed, sailing from Methil with coal. Mined, laid by UC.77 (Reinhard von Rabenau), foundered 3/4m ESE of Red Head, Forfar (L – 3/4m ESE of Red Head, Orkneys; te –1/4m ESE of Red Head, Forfar, in 56.37N, 02.27W; wi – 3/4m E of Red Head, Arbroath, in 56.37.12N, 02.37.36W). Note: the Orkneys location is incorrect; wreck lies in two halves in 70ft depth, identified by cutlery found by divers (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

HIGHFLYER, light cruiser – see HALIFAX HARBOUR EXPLOSION, 6 December 1917 (see log books for further details)


HIGHLANDER, Admiralty trawler – see GHURKA, destroyer, 8 February 1917, English Channel

HILARY II, hired drifter, 25 March 1916, English Channel - 78grt, built 1902, Yarmouth-reg YH674, hired 5/15 as net drifter, 13pdr, Admiralty No.1410, Skipper Samuel Falgate RNR, based at Sheerness. Mined, laid by UC.7 (Georg Haag), sank at 0840 near Spit Buoy (He - 5 miles ENE of); Skipper and 7 ratings lost, 2 survivors. Note: there are various “Spit Buoy’s”; Hepper confirms this one is off the Kent coast, with wreck located at 51.28.30N, 01.34E (H/C/D/He/dk/un; ADM.1/8451/66)

HIMALAYA, armed merchant cruiser - see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign

HINDUSTAN, battleship – see WRESTLER, destroyer, after April 1918, believed southern British waters

HIRONDELLE, possibly still store carrier, 25 April 1917, Bay of Biscay - passenger ship, 1,648grt, built 1890, London-reg, General Steam Navigation Co, hired 8/14 by Admiralty as squadron supply ship/store carrier, armed, Admiralty No.Y9.17, believed returned to mercantile service 11/15 (D - listed as “BDV water carrier” from 6/15 & implies still in Admiralty service when lost), sailing London for Bordeaux with general cargo. Torpedoed by UC.36 (Gustav Buch), sank 13 miles S by E of Belle Ile, W of St Nazaire (H/L/D/te/un)

HIROSE, hired trawler, 29 June 1916, North Sea – 275grt, built c1915, Cardiff-reg CF44, Neale & West, hired 1915 (D - 6/16, i.e. month of loss), 13pdr, Admiralty No.3280, Skipper Harry Pearce RNR, believed Harwich-based. Patrolling war channel off Lowestoft. Mined aft, laid by UC.6 (Otto Ehrentraut) (He – probably laid by UC.1), sank off Aldborough or Aldeburgh Napes (C/wi - off Aldeburgh, near Orford Ness, in 52.08.10N, 01.42.10E); Skipper and 9 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3189)

HIRPA, hired whaler, 2 January 1918, North Sea - 110grt, built 1911, Leith-reg LH157, hired 1914 (D - 1/15), 1-6pdr, Pendant No.2317. Serving as patrol vessel, on passage Longhope to Dundee, ran ashore in poor weather in Cluny harbour, Buckie, Banff in Moray Firth. Salvage attempt made but became total loss; no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/681)

HOCKWOLD, Admiralty chartered collier, 9 September 1917, English Channel - 1,472grt, built 1911, London-reg, Cory Colliers, 20 crew, Penarth for Dover with coal. (wi - 8th; dk – 10th) - In collision with Sunderland-reg SS Intent, sank 6 1/2m W by S of Lizard Point, Cornwall (wi - in 49.55.30N, 05.21.30W); 10 crew lost, including one naval seaman (H/Lr/dk/wi)

HOLDENE, hired trawler, 2 February 1917, North Sea - 274grt, built 1915, Fleetwood-reg FD161, Lune Steam Fishing, hired 9/15, 1 13pdr/1 3pdr AA, Admiralty No.437, employed as a minesweeper, Harwich-based, Lt Richard Walsh RNR. Sailing with Admiralty hired trawler Drummer Boy to carry out sweep E of Orfordness, just about to connect up. Mined, laid by UC.11 (Benno von Ditfurth) the previous night, sank immediately off Orford Ness, Suffolk (un - 52.01.30N, 01.54E; wi - in 52.05N, 01.36E); 7 ratings lost (+L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/fd/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3236)

HOLLYLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 30 April 1918, Mediterranean - Leaf-class, 5,167grt/12,300t, armed. U-boat attacked, torpedo missed (H/D)

HOLMESBANK, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 May 1917, Eastern Mediterranean - 3,051grt, built 1906, Cardiff-reg, Kestell SS Co (Kestell Bros), armed, sailing Swansea for Port Said with coal. Captured by U.38 (Max Valentiner), sunk by gunfire 90 miles N by W of Alexandria (L/te/un - in 32.26N, 29.30E; un – also 35.53N, 29.30E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

HOPE, destroyer, March 1917, Irish Sea - H-class, 970t, believed Devonport-based 2nd DF. March - In collision with Birkenhead ferry Prenton, damaged starboard side below waterline. Note – "gr" refers to the researches of Mr George Ransome. NHN notes alongside this entry refer to "6 March 1918?", so the year may be uncertain (Cn/D/gr)

HORNET, destroyer, Friday 7 December 1917, Dover Straits - I-class, c990t, Devonport-based 4th DF. Damaged in collision, towed stern first into Dover (Cn/D/dp/gr)

HS.3, tug, 12 September 1917, Atlantic off SW Portugal -  tug, 121grt, towing barge RB.10 (un – RB.40, 800t). Captured by UB.50 (Franz Becker), both tug and barge sunk by bombs 18 miles W by N of Cape Sines, S of Lisbon. Note: see introductory notes for HS tugs and RB barges (H/L/un)

HS.4, tug, 21 August 1917, Atlantic off NW France - 121grt, towing barge RB.6, 800t. (un – barge on the 20th) - Captured by UC.72 (Ernst Voight), both tug and barge sunk by bombs 130 miles WSW of Ushant (H/L/D/tu/un)

HS.48, tug, 9 October 1917, Atlantic W of Gibraltar – U-boat attack, torpedo missed

HUELVA, Admiralty chartered collier, 23 July 1917, Atlantic SW of Ireland - 4,867grt, built 1915, English & American Shipping Co, London, armed, Newport for Malta with Admiralty cargo. Torpedoed by U.54 (Kurt Heeseler), sank 270 miles SW of Fastnet Rock, off Co Cork (L - 350 miles SW of Ushant; te/un - in 47.15N, 12.28W; un – also 47.19N, 12.38W) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

HUGHLI, salvage tug, 26 April 1919, North Sea - Royal Fleet Auxiliary, Lieutenant Peter Cosgrave RNR. Carrying naval stores from Ostend to Dover, capsized in violent storm off Middelkerke; 18 lives lost, 11 survivors (He – 29 lost) (D/He/dk)

HUNSBRIDGE, Admiralty chartered collier, 7 September 1917, Atlantic off NW Morocco - ex-German, 3,424grt, built 1912, now Galbraith, Pembroke & Co (un – The Shipping Controller (Farrar, Groves & Co), London), armed, Swansea for Gibraltar also carrying stores. Torpedoed by UB.49 (Hans von Mellenthin), sank 60 miles SW by W3/4W of Cape Spartel (L/te/un - in 35.10N, 06.50W; un – also 35.15N, 07.00W); two crew lost (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un)

HURLFORD, Admiralty chartered collier, 29 April 1917, Atlantic off W Scotland - 444grt, built 1905, Glasgow-reg, Ford Shipping, crew 9, Mr J O'Hara, carrying coal. Wrecked on S coast of Tiree island (wi - on Roan Bogha Rock, Gunna island, between Tiree and Coll islands, in 56.32.30N, 06.40.05W) (H/Lr/wi)

HYACINTH [01], light cruiser, 11 April 1916, German East Africa Campaign - two naval vessels lost crew members "in action" in East African waters on the same day. Note: Allied land forces were active in German East Africa in this period, also coastal operations had been proposed as part of the plan to capture Dar-es-Salaam which surrendered to naval forces in September: HYACINTH, old light cruiser, Highflyer-class, 5,650t, 1898, Cape and East Africa station (sank German SS Tabora at Dar-es-Salaam on 23/3/16); 2 ratings lost on this day, 1 rating may have died of injuries on 15 July (Rn/Cn/D/dk); ECHO, Admiralty-owned whaler, 182grt, built 1912, purchased 1/15, serving off East Africa; 3 ratings lost (D/dk);

HYACINTH [02], light cruiser – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign


I

I & J, hired drifter, 1 January 1919, English Channel - Skipper James Murray Baxter RNR. Strong gale, driven ashore on beach at Newhaven night of 1st/2nd. Poor weather continued and she had largely broken up by the 7th; no lives lost (D/He/dk; ADM.1/8496/190)

IDAHO, hired yacht – see STRUMBLE, Q-ship, 4 May 1917, St George's Channel

IDENA, hired trawler, 5 February 1918, Norwegian Sea - 270grt, built 1917, Fleetwood-reg FD288, J Marr & Son, hired 3/17 as minesweeper, 112pdr, Admiralty No.3332, Skipper Alexander Green RNR. With group of ships sailing for the White Sea, leaks started and gale blew up. Started to settle at 0900 on the 5th, crew taken off and scuttled by gunfire in 71N, 17E (D - off Tromso, NW Norway); no lives lost. Note - Colledge only lists hired drifter Idena, 95grt, in service to 1919 (H/D/He/dk/fd; ADM.137/691)

ILVINGTON COURT, Admiralty chartered collier, 6 December 1917, Western Mediterranean - 4,217grt, built 1911, Court Line, Liverpool, armed, Barry for Malta with coal and general cargo. Torpedoed by U.34 (Johannes Klasing), sank 8 miles NW by N of Shershel/Cape Cherchell, W of Algiers (L/te/un - in 36.43N, 02.06E); eight crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

INA WILLIAM, hired trawler, 30 May 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - (L/Lr/D - Inawilliam), 337grt, built 1913, Grimsby-reg GY872 (He - Fleetwood), Hecla STEAM Fishing Co (J Harris), hired 1916 as minesweeper (D - 4/15; wi - as armed patrol sweeper), 1-12pdr, Admiralty No.2658, Skipper Charles Slapp RNR, on patrol. Mined at 0923, laid by UC.50 (Rudolf Seuffer) on 21 May, sank rapidly off Bull Rock Light, off Berehaven, Co Cork (He/un – 2 miles S of, in 51.14N, 10.18W; wi - 51.30N, 10.20W); Skipper and 11 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/450)

INDIAN EMPIRE, hired trawler – see MOROCOCOLA, hired trawler, 19 November 1917, Atlantic off S Ireland

INNISTRAHULL, cargo steamship, 1916 - now Admiralty water carrier (Cn/D - water tank vessel), 238grt, built 1913, Glasgow-reg, Coasting Motor Shipping, Glasgow, purchased 15/9/15 as RFA. Wrecked in 1916, no other details (Lr/C/Cn/D)

INTENT, Admiralty chartered collier, 8 March 1918, North Sea - 1,564grt, built 1911, Westoll Line/James Westoll, Sunderland-reg, armed, 21 crew, Mr W Wood, from Sheerness for Newcastle/Tyne in ballast. (wi - 7th) - Torpedoed by UC.40 (Hermann Menzel), hit in engine room at 0730, ship abandoned and sank at 0745, 4 miles E by N of Seaham (wi - in 54.51.45N, 01.13W); 2nd engineer missing, presumed killed by explosion, survivors rescued by patrol vessel and landed at North Shields (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

INVERBERVIE, Admiralty collier, 14 September 1916, Central Mediterranean - (may be spelt Inververbie), 4,309grt, built 1913, Glasgow-reg, Inverkip SS, armed, Cardiff/Messina for Taranto with coal, 4 naval ML's. Torpedoed by UC.14 (Alfred Klatt) (te - Austrian U.IV), sank in Gulf of Squillace, 17 miles S by W of Cape Rizzuto, Italy (L - 15 miles SW of Cape Rizzuto; He/te - in 38.55N, 16.15E); 6 lives lost (H/L/Lr/D/te/un; Casualty list – one RNR rating only). Of the four ML.51 series motor launches carried as deck cargo, one floated off and was later based at Mudros for patrol in the Aegean, the other three were lost: ML.230 (H/Cn/D/ap/un); ML.253 (H/Cn/D/ap/un); ML.255 (H/Cn/D/ap/un)

IOLAIRE [01], hired yacht, 8 June 1917, off SW Scotland - 862grt, built 1902, hired 1/3/15, renamed Amalthaea 11grt, built 18. Collided with and sank SS Bonawe 223grt, 1 1/2m NE of Point Corrie, Isle of Arran (wi - in 55.39.30N, 05.06W) (D/gr/wi)

IOLAIRE [02], hired yacht, 16 February 1918, off W Scotland - 862grt, built 1902, hired 3/15. In collision with and sank SS Madame Alice 478grt, 2 miles SW of Oban, E of Isle of Mull and near Firth of Lorne (wi - Madam Alice, in 56.27.22N, 05.29.15W) (D/gr/wi)

IOLO, Admiralty chartered collier, 11 October 1916, Barents Sea - 3,908grt, built 1898, London-reg, Iolo Morganwg SS, Cardiff for Archangel with coal. Captured by U.46 (Leo Hillbrand), sunk by torpedo 153 miles N of Vardo island (L - in 72.50N, 32E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

IRAWADI, hired trawler, 10 August 1916, Eastern Mediterranean - 238grt, built 1906, Hull-reg H941, East Riding Steam Trawling, hired 1915 (D - 8/14) as minesweeper, Admiralty No.270. Wrecked on Tigani Rocks, just NW of Cape Matapan, Greece (He - Tigani rocks, Khios); no lives lost (H/Lr/C/D/dk/hw)

IRON DUKE, dreadnought, 18 August 1916, North Sea - Iron Duke-class, Flagship, Grand Fleet, left Scapa Flow for sweep in southern part of North Sea, proceeding ahead of Battle Fleet screened by two destroyers. Torpedoed fired by U-boat about 250yds off around 1955, missed Iron Duke and passed astern of destroyer Onslaught (Cn/gf/kt)

ISER, Admiralty chartered collier, Friday 23 February 1917, Bay of Biscay - 2,160grt, built 1888, Dundee-reg, James Mitchell & Sons, armed, Newport for Rochefort with coal. Torpedoed by UC.17 (Ralph Wenninger), sank 14 miles NW of Belle Ile, W of St Nazaire (te - in 47.28N, 03.35W); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ISLANDMORE, Admiralty-chartered collier, 3 June 1917, Western Mediterranean - 3,046grt, built 1909, Limerick-reg, Limerick SS, armed, sailing Cardiff and Barry for Gibraltar and Malta with coal. Captured by U.33 (Gustav Siess), sunk by gunfire c20 miles NW of Cape Falcon, near Oran, Algeria (te - 35.46N, 00.48W; un – 35.52N, 01.09W); two crew including one naval seaman lost, master taken prisoner (H/L/Lr/Mn/te/un)

ITALY, hired trawler, 3 September 1916, North Sea - 145grt, built 1896, Grimsby-reg GY92, North Eastern Steam Fishing, hired 12/14, 16pdr, Admiralty No.720, Skipper Thomas Molloy RNR. Patrol vessel, in collision with Norwegian SS IngridII, 1,141grt off Sunderland, Co Durham, foundered at 0315; no lives lost (H/Lr/C/D/dk; ADM.137/276)


J

J.2, submarine, 7 July 1917, North Sea - U.99 sunk by J.2 east of the Orkneys (dx)

J. Y. SHORT, Admiralty chartered collier, 4 October 1916, Barents Sea - 2,193grt, built 1887, Sunderland-reg, Westoll Line, Penarth for Archangel with coal. (L/te/UN - 3rd) - Captured by U.43 (Hellmuth Jürst), sunk by gunfire 80 miles E of Vardo, Norway (L - in 70.14N, 35.03E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

JACAMAR, hired trawler, 28 January 1917, Dover Straits - 293grt, built 1911, Grimsby-reg GY649, T W Baskcomb, hired 5/15 as minesweeper, 112pdr, Admiralty No.1207, Dover Patrol, Skipper George Sleeth RNR. Bound for Thames estuary. In collision with collier Southwark (ms – believed 558grt) off Folkestone Southgate LV, foundered at 0300 (D - Folkestone LV; He – off Folkestone Eastern gate light); 5 ratings drowned, 8 survivors (+Lr/C/D/He/ms/dk/dq; ADM.137/353)

JACK, hired screw tug, 9 August 1917, North Sea - ex-Jackal, ex-Woodcock, ex-William Jolliffe, 360grt, built 1885, Belfast-reg, Ocean Transport, hired 1/1/15, Lieutenant Jonathan Sumner RNVR. Towing a lighter and entering the River Tyne in thick fog in the early hours. Ran aground 100 yards N of Bondicar and holed, crew taken off, filled with water and abandoned as a wreck (C - later salved, hire continued until 1919) (H/Lr/C/D; ADM.137/489)

JAMES FLETCHER, hired yacht, 11 January 1916, Dover Straits - (dp/dq – drifter, ms - fisheries patrol), 264grt, built 1907, hired 25/9/14, 2-6pdr AA/1-2pdr, Dover Patrol, on patrol off South Goodwins. Sighted UC.6 and rammed twice, UC.6 got back to Zeebrugge for repairs, yacht examined on the mud and some damage discovered below the waterline (Rn/D/dp/dq/ms)

JAMES SECKAR, Admiralty-owned trawler, 25 September 1917, North Atlantic - standard Castle-class, c255grt, 20/7/17, 1-12pdr/1 bomb thrower, c15 crew, Admiralty No.3526, CO was non-commissioned 2nd Hand (He - Skipper Robert Brown RNR). Last seen west of Bay of Biscay in 46.30N, 12.00W, disappeared, believed foundered around this date in bad weather, listed to 1921; all 16 ratings lost. Now confirmed torpedoed and sunk by UC.63 (Karsten von Heydebreck) on this date 10 miles N of Santona, N Spain after going to the assistance of torpedoed French merchantmen Dinorah (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk)

JANE RADCLIFFE, Admiralty chartered collier, 28 November 1917, Aegean Sea - 4,074grt, built 1897, Jane Radcliffe SS Co, London, armed, Barry for Milos/Port Said with coal. Originally believed torpedoed, now confirmed as mined, laid by UC.74 (Wilhelm Marschall), sank 2 miles SW of Antimilo island, off Milo island, S of Athens (L - between Milo and Anti Milo Is) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

JAY, hired trawler, 11 August 1917, North Sea - c144grt, built 1897, Hull-reg H534, Kelsall Bros & Beeching, hired 10/14 as minesweeper, 16pdr AA, Admiralty No.375, Skipper Edwin Bullock RNR. Heading back to Great Yarmouth after sweeping near Southwold, Suffolk. Torpedoed at 1515 starboard side by UB.35 (Karl Stoter), sank rapidly by the stern off Southwold (He – about 500 yards from C buoy; un – 55.19N, 01.49E; wi - in 52.20N, 01.45E); 1 officer, 8 ratings lost (He – two survivors) (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/fd/hw/un/wi; ADM.137/3321)

JEAN, hired drifter, 17 October 1917, Central Mediterranean - 94grt, built 1907, Fraserburgh-reg FR238, hired 1916 (D - 3/15) as net drifter, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.2490, Otranto Barrage drifter tender, Lieutenant John Philip Allix RNR. Returning to Taranto and mined, sank off Cape Santa Maria di Leuca at eastern entrance to Gulf of Taranto, Italy (He – in 39.43N 18.18E); 1 officer, 8 ratings lost (H/L/C/D/dk; ADM.137/3375)

JESSAMINE, fleet sweeping sloop 29 August 1917, St George's Channel - COOROY, 4-mast steel barque, 2,470grt, built 1892, London-reg, Commonwealth of Australia, 23 crew, Tocopilla for Liverpool with nitrate of soda. Captured by UC.33 (un – UC.75), sunk by torpedo 10 miles S by W1/2W of Hook Point, Co Waterford (L/wi - 16 miles SSE of Ballycotton, in 52.35N, 07.48W); lives lost included seven armed guards from Jessamine (H/L/Lr/un/wi)

JESSIE NUTTEN, hired trawler, 4 September 1916, North Sea - 187grt, built 1908, Aberdeen-reg A243, J E Nutten, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.312, Skipper Oscar Pitcher RNR. Sailing from Lowestoft with six other trawlers to sweep off the port. Mined at 0730, laid by UC.1 (Kurt Ramien), sank rapidly off Lowestoft, Suffolk; Skipper and 4 ratings lost; 6 crew rescued by other trawlers (wi - in 52.28N, 01.47E) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3190)

JOHN E LEWIS, hired trawler, 16 January 1918, North Sea - 253grt, built 1911, John Lewis & Sons, Aberdeen-reg A354, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 13pdr, Admiralty No.321, Lt Francis Woods RNR, Harwich-based. Sweeping with other vessels near Sunk LV, weather worsened with heavy snow and ordered to return to Harwich. While forming in line ahead, trawler Drummer Boy, with John E Lewis next astern, sighted one floating mine. John E Lewis then detonated another mine, laid by UC.11 (Ferdinand Schwartz) earlier that day, sank in about 8 minutes off Cork LV, off Harwich (He – places her sinking near Sunk LV which is some miles further offshore than the Cork; He/un – in 51.54.30N, 01.24.30E; wi - in 51.53N, 01.23.45E); 2 ratings killed by explosion (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/3412)

JOHN HIGH, hiredtrawler, 7 August 1916, Barents Sea - German auxiliary minelayer Meteor laid mines in June 1915 along the North Russian Murman coast and six Lowestoft-based trawlers were sent to sweep them from July to November 1915. More mines were laid of the same coast by U-boats in 1916, and a second group of minesweeping trawlers sailed from Lowestoft, John High, 228grt, built 1915, North Shields-reg SN233, hired 1/16 as minesweeper, 1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.3252, 16 crew, Skipper John High, sweeping U-boat-laid mines, heavy sea running. Mined at 0545, laid by U.75 (Kurt Beitzen), blown up and sank off Mount Sozonova, North Russia (He – in 67.34N, 41.10E); Skipper and 13 ratings lost, all hands except the mate who was standing in the bows with lifebelt on, blown overboard and rescued by another trawler before the cold water killed him (H/L/C/He/ap/dk/sc/un; ADM.1/8465/198)

JOHN LINCOLN, hired drifter – see German Destroyer Raid on Dover Straits, 25 February 1917

JOHN MITCHELL, hired drifter, 14 November 1917, English Channel - 89grt, built 1913, Lowestoft-reg LT211, hired 2/15 as net drifter, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.1065, Skipper George Blowers RNR. In collision at 0145 with SS Bjerka, sailing Newport to Leith, sank off St. Albans Head, Dorset (He -  50.32N 01.42W; wi - in 50.30N, 02W); no lives lost (H/C/D/dk/wi; ADM.137/578)


JOHN O SCOTT, Admiralty chartered collier, 18 September 1918, Atlantic off SW England - 1,235grt, built 1906, Newcastle-reg, Steamship Tyne (un – Chr Salvesen & Co), 1-12pdr, 19 crew, Mr P Ross, Barry for Dover with coal. Torpedoed by UB.117 (Erwin Wassner) at 0445, sank in minutes, 9 miles W by N of Trevose Head, north Cornwall (L/te/un/wi - in 50.32N, 05.16.30W); 18 lives lost including master, only survivor was Greek AB who stayed afloat clinging to wreckage, rescued by motor launch after 10 hours in the water, landed at Newquay (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

JOHN PAYNE, hired rescue tug – see RACE FISHER, fleet messenger, 25 March 1919, Mediterranean

JOHN ROBERT, hired drifter, 1 February 1919, Mediterranean - 89grt, built 1912, Yarmouth-reg YH708, hired 1/15 as net drifter, 1-3pdr AA, Admiralty No.1035, Skipper John Stewart RNR, on passage Mersina, SE Turkey (ge - Messina) to Alexandretta, NW Syria, possibly on post-war mine clearance. Departed on 1st and not seen again, presumed sunk by drifting mine off Cape Karadesh, SE Turkey; 1 officer, 8 ratings lost, no survivors (D/He/dk/ge; ADM.1/8496/190)

JOLLY ROGER, motor launch, 4 June 1919, North Russia - ex-Bolshevik, original name not known, 70ft, armed with 37mm guns/medium mg’s, taken by rail from Murmansk to River Onega with other ex-Bolshevik motor boats and two steam launches to form local naval force. Engines failed regularly, caught fire and exploded; no lives listed as lost (gb - killed several crew). That same day four British mg-armed motor boats went out to meet four larger armed Bolshevik steamers which were driven off when two flights of seaplanes bombed and strafed (dk/gb)


K

KANGURU, depot/docking-ship 3 December 1916, Central Atlantic - in a new area of operations for U-boats, U.38 sank British SS Dacia, French gunboat Surprise and depot/docking-ship Kanguru off Funchal, Madeira, then shelled the town for two hours (dx) (Note: not known if Kanguru was a British naval vessel)

KAPHREDA, hired trawler, 8 June 1916, North Sea - 245grt, built 1911, Fleetwood-reg FD188, T F Kelsall, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.364, SubLt John Patterson RNVR, Skipper George Baldry RNR. Sweeping area around Corton LV, lead vessel of group about to pass down Hewett Channel. Mined, laid by UC.6 (Otto Ehrentraut), sank rapidly near Corton LV, off Yarmouth (wi - in 52.31N, 01.48E); Skipper and 8 ratings lost, 4 survivors (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/fd/un/wi ; ADM.137/3188)

KELVIN, hired trawler, 7 July 1917, North Sea - 322grt, built 1915, Hull-reg H357, F & T Ross, hired 11/15 as minesweeper, 16pdr AA, Admiralty No.1974, Lt Robert Thomas RNR. Sailed from Harwich at 0630 as division leader to sweep channel into the port - for three hours each side of high water; returning west across a swept area. Mined at 1320, laid by UC.4 (Erich Hecht), sank off Harwich, Essex (wi - in 51.54N, 01.20E); 1 officer, 3 ratings lost, Lt Thomas, an “elderly man” and prewar sailing ship master might have been saved but gave his piece of wreckage to one of the crew who could not swim (He – 13 survivors) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/wi; ADM.137/3317)

KEMPENFELT, flotilla leader – see KING EDWARD VII, predreadnought, 6 January 1916, Atlantic N of Scotland

KENT COUNTY, Q-ship 8 December 1916, North Sea - - special service ship, drifter, 86grt, built 1911, Lowestoft-reg LT1129, hired as naval patrol boat, Admiralty No.203, decoy vessel in 1915 (D - 9/14, probably date hired as patrol boat), 1-6pdr, commissioned, also known as Kentish Knock, Ledger No. 17, Skipper Samuel Burwood RNR. On patrol off Great Yarmouth. Mined, U-boat-laid (un – U-boat not identified), sank off Cross Sand, off Lowestoft (wi - off Great Yarmouth, in 52.37N, 01.50.45E; un – 1 mile NNW of Cross Sand LV) (He – disappeared night of 7th/8th, wreckage found, presumed detonated drifting mine); Skipper and 10 ratings lost, no survivors (H/C/Cn/D/He/dk/qs/wi; ADM.1/8475/293)

KENT [01], cruiser 3 January 1919, Russian Intervention - Armoured cruiser Kent joined Japanese and American warships at Vladivostok, Eastern Siberia (dx)

KENT [02], cruiser, 6 April 1919, Russian Intervention - Armoured cruiser Kent landed guns' crews at Vladivostok for transport 4,500 miles to Kama River, southern Urals to support White Russians (dx)

KENT [03], cruiser, 18 August 1919, Russian Intervention - Kent's gunnery detachment returned to Vladivostok from service in the Ural Mountains area (dx)

KETHAILES, hired yacht, 11 October 1917, St George's Channel - 625grt, built 1903, hired 23/9/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel, 2-3pdr or 6pdr, Pennant No.012, Lt-Cdr Sidney Reginald Lane RNR. In collision with Liverpool-bound Bibby Line SS Leicestershire, at 22.55, eleven miles NE of Blackwater light vessel, County Wexford and broke up quickly (wi - in 52.28N, 06W); 2 officers, 3 ratings, 12 MMR lost  Eleven survivors, nine picked up by escorting patrol ship P.44 (H/J/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/553, ADM.137/678, ADM.53/56495)

KILBRIDE, Admiralty collier, 1 March 1916, Central Mediterranean - 3,712grt, built 1901, Glasgow-reg, Napier & Connell, Glasgow, sailing Barry for Malta/Salonika with coal. Captured by U.38 (Max Valentiner), sunk by gunfire 30 miles E of Galita Is, Tunisia (H/L/Lr/ms/te/un)

KILDONAN CASTLE, armed merchant cruiser, 27 October 1916, North Atlantic - 9,692grt, built 1899, hired 25/3/16, lately joined 10th CS, patrolling in 63.13N, 18.30W. Two torpedoes fired at her and missed, went to full speed, searched for U-boat but already dived (Mn/D)

KILLINGHOLME, seaplane carrier, 27 April 1916, North Sea - also known as paddle air service scout, ex-paddle steamer, 508grt, built 1912, Great Central Railway, hired 21/2/16-21/4/17 as fleet messenger, carried 2 or 3 small seaplanes for coastal anti-airship patrols, Killingholme-based. Possibly mined and damaged, no other details; 2 officers, 4 rating, 12 MN lost. Paid off 21/4/17 (C/D/bt/dk)

KILWINNING, Admiralty chartered collier, 24 August 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,071grt, built 1898, Kilwinning SS Co, Glasgow, armed, Barry for Port Said with coal and general cargo. Torpedoed by Austrian U.XIV (Georg Ritter von Trapp), sank 94 miles ESE of Malta (L/te/un - in 35.26N, 16.30E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

KIMBERLEY, trawler, 27 May 1916, North Sea - U.74 was reviously recorded as sunk by four trawlers including Kimberley off Peterhead on this date. Now listed as sunk by accidental explosion of one of her mines off Dunbar, Scotland on the 17 May 1916 (dx/un)

KINCARDINE, Admiralty chartered collier, 3 March 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - 4,108grt, built 1906, Newcastle-reg, Sutherland SS, 1-12pdr, 32 crew, Mr J Beeching, Cardiff for Genoa with 5,800t coal. Torpedoed by U.70 (Otto Wünsche) at 1430, immediately abandoned, apparently sank three hours later, 20 miles NE of Tearagh Is, off Blaskett islands (L - 18 miles N of Tearaght Light; te/wi - in 52.22N, 10.26W); survivors picked up by naval vessel and landed at Berehaven. Note: loss position appears to be inconsistent with a course from Cardiff to Genoa (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

KING EDWARD VII, predreadnought, 6 January 1916, Atlantic N of Scotland - (J - King Edward), King Edward VII-class, c17,290t, 1903, 4-12in/4-9.2in/10-6in/12-12pdr/14-3pdr/5-18in tt, 18kts, c777 crew, Pendant No.66, flagship 3rd BS Grand Fleet, Capt Crawford MacLachlan, sailed Scapa 0700 on passage to Belfast to refit, strong westerly wind with rising sea. Explosion at 1047, first thought torpedoed, then confirmed mined in a field of 252 mines laid by raider Möwe night of 1st/2nd in western approach to Pentland Firth between Strathy Point and Cape Wrath, 3 to 7 miles off the coast. Detonated starboard-side under engine-room, ship heeled to starboard and both engine-rooms filled, taken in tow by collier Melita (He - steamer Princess Amelia) assisted by flotilla leader Kempenfelt sent out from Scapa Flow with 12 destroyers, now low in the water and unmanageable, tow parted and by 1600 ship had a heavy list, rolled over and sank at 2010 (all quoted positions are assumed to be where she was mined: J/gf - in 58.43N, 04.12W; kp - 58.43N, 04.04W; wi - 7 1/4m NE by N of Strathy Point LH, in 58.42.22N, 03.53.34W; dx - 25 miles 080º from Cape Wrath; other positions include off Cape Wrath, between Sule Skerry and Cape Wrath, and near Sule Skerry; He – sank in 58.46N 04.11W); no lives lost, ship’s company saved by destroyers Fortune, Marne, Musketeer, Nessus. King Edward VII at his namesake’s launch insisted “that she should always be a flagship and she was lost on her first voyage as a private ship”. Two neutral steamers went down in the same field (H/J/Rn/C/Cn/D/He*/ap/dk/dx/gf/ke/sc/wi; ADM.1/8444/7)

KING EMPEROR, hired trawler, 4 February 1916, SE England - minesweeper, in collision off Sheerness, survived and repaired. Officer, skipper and six crew lost (dk)

KING STEPHEN, Q-ship – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

KING'S GREY, hired trawler, 24 March 1917, English Channel - minesweeper. Mined and damaged near Royal Sovereign LV in 50.42'N, 00.27'E, laid by UC.72 (Ernst Voigt); three crew killed (D/dk/un)

KINGFISHER hired trawler - see OCEAN’S GIFT II, hired motor drifter, 30 August 1917, North Sea

KINROSS, twin screw minesweeper, 16 June 1919, Aegean Sea - Aberdare-class, 800t, 4/7/18, 1-4in QF/1-12pdr AA, 16kts, 74 crew, P/No. T.5N from 8/18, had served with Mediterranean Fast Sweepers, engaged in postwar sweeping operations, Lieutenant Reginald Wemyss Duke Gilbertson RNR. Working with a kite balloon and clearing field S of Imbros island. Mine detonated and set of a line of more mines, holed a number of times, rolled over and sank less than an hour later off the Dardanelles; 12 ratings lost (He – 11 men died from explosion or injuries) (J/C/Cn/He/D/dk/ge/sc; ADM.116/2062)

KIRKLAND, hired trawler, 20 August 1917, Shetlands - 224grt, built 1908, G H D Birt & D J Davies, London-reg LO282, hired 1915 (D - 8/14) as minesweeper, Admiralty No.360, Skipper D Davies (He - Skipper Charles Arthur Garnish RNR, in casualty list). Escorting oiler Kremlin from Swarbacks Minn anchorage, Shetland Islands, with another trawler. Mined, laid by U.80 (Alfred von Glasenapp) on 27/28 June 1917 (un – Barrage 129c), sank immediately off Fugla Skerry, Papastour (He – between Ve Skerries and Papa Stour; un – in 60.21N, 01.47W; wi - in 60.20N, 01.50W); 1 officer, 10 ratings lost (He – one survivor) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3306)

KITTY GEORGE, hired drifter – see GRACIE, hired drifter, 10 February 1917, North Sea

KLONDYKE, hired trawler, 4 June 1916, English Channel - (C - Klondike),155grt, built 1898, Hull-reg H420, Hull Steam Fishing, hired 1915 (D - 10/14) as minesweeper, Admiralty No.647. In collision with steamship Hindu (770 tons), sank near Owers LV, SE of Selsey Bill, Sussex (He – in collision four miles SW of Owers light vessel, at 1am); 1 rating lost (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw; ADM.137/239)

KNIGHTSGARTH, Admiralty collier, 5 January 1918, North Channel - 2,889grt, built 1905, Rea Shipping Co (R & J H Rea), Liverpool, armed, 22 crew, Mr J Catterall, from Lough Swilly after coaling warships, now heading for Barry Dock still carrying fleet supplies, but in ballast. Torpedoed by U.91 (Alfred von Glasenapp), 5 miles WNW of Bull Point, Rathlin Is (L - off Bengore Head; wi - in 55.17.38N, 06.17.05W), crew abandoned ship, slowly filled, drifted with the tide and grounded just S of Bull Point; two crew killed by explosion, survivors rowed ashore, landed near Giant's Causeway, and made for Portrush and on to Belfast. “Wreck Index” reports that local people salvaged much of her fleet supplies, including flour, tinned and preserved foods, candles, small arms and ammumition. Wreck lies close to the cliff at Tolovey in depths ranging from 1527ft (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

KREMLIN, possibly Admiralty chartered oiler – see KIRKLAND, hired trawler, 20 August 1917, Shetlands

KUMU, hired trawler, 19 May 1917, English Channel – minesweeper. Mined and damaged, laid by UC.17 (Ralph Wenninger) on 11 May, 5 miles E by N of Hope's Nose, in 50.31N, 03.20W; two crew killed (D/dk/un)

KURDISTAN, Admiralty chartered collier, 20 September 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,720grt, built 1914, Hindustan SS Co, Sunderland, armed, Blyth for Alexandria with coal and coke. Torpedoed by U.32 (Kurt Hartwig), sank 27 miles ESE of Pantellaria island, off Tunisia (L - in 36.40N, 12.38E; un – in 36.40N, 12.37E, also 36.43N, 12.42E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

KUROKI, hired trawler – see SISTERS MELVILLE, hired trawler, 13 February 1917, North Sea

KYLEMORE [01], paddle minesweeper, 1 May 1916, Dover Straits - 319grt, built 1897, hired 23/11/15, Dunkirk-based, sweeping British minefield near Dyck Bank with other paddlers. Mine exploded by rifle fire, pieces swept the deck; two men killed and buried in France, one man slightly injured (D/dk/sc)

KYLEMORE [02], paddle minesweeper – see ESKBURN, hired drifter, 30 November 1916, Dover Straits


L

LABURNUM [01], fleet sweeping sloop – see FARNBOROUGH, Q-ship, 17 February 1917, Atlantic W of Ireland

LABURNUM [02], fleet sweeping sloop, 15 June 1917, Atlantic off S Ireland - Acacia-class, 1,200t. In collision with US destroyer Jenkins 883t at Queenstown (Cn/gr)

LADY CARRINGTON, Admiralty collier, 12 November 1916, Atlantic off NW Spain - 3,269grt, built 1907, Cardiff-reg, Carrington SS, armed, Barry for Malta with coal. Captured by U.49 (Richard Hartmann), sunk by torpedo 98 miles N by W of Cape Ortegal (te - in 44.15N, 08.50W; L - 49.15N, 08.50W). Note: if Cape Ortegal is correct, Lloyd’s latitude would be a transcription error (H/L/Lr/te/un)

LADY CHARLOTTE, Admiralty chartered collier, 11 May 1917, Atlantic off SW England - 3,593grt, built 1905, London-reg, Redcroft Steam Navigation, Cardiff for Alexandria. (wi - 13th or 14th) - Stranded in dense fog, wrecked off Scillies (wi - on Clapper Rocks, Porth Hellick, St. Mary's Island in 49.54.50N, 06.16.40W). Note: Lady Charlotte 3,593grt attacked 17/3/18 - if the same vessel, the attack came after her loss according to HMSO (H/Lr/wi)

LADY OLIVE, Q-ship, 19 February 1917, English Channel - ex-Tees Trader, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, ex-coaster, 701grt, built 1913, London-reg, British & Irish Steam Packet, 701grt, hired 24/11/16 as decoy ship Q.18 (qs - entered service 18/12/16), 1-4in/4-12pdr/dc's, Lt Frederic Frank RNR, on patrol in western reaches of English Channel. Submarine sighted astern 3 miles away at 0635, UC.18 (Wilhelm Kiel) opened fire, hitting Lady Olive during the approach, panic party away, U-boat only 100yds off by 0710. Lady Olive opened fire, killing the gun crew and hitting the conning tower before she dived, intended to drop depth charges but engine and boiler-rooms flooding and wireless smashed, Q-ship and U-boat sank off Channel Islands (J - Lady Olive torpedoed; qs - torpedoed after action; ub - first torpedoed by U-boat; dx/te/ub/un - 12 miles W of Jersey, in 49.15N, 02.34W); no lives lost in Lady Olive, forced to abandon ship in three boats and two rafts, headed for French coast but made poor progress, all crew into the boats later that afternoon, rafts abandoned. One of the boats lost touch by 2200 but reached Cherbourg, the other two rowed all night and into the next day, sometime after 1700 spotted by French destroyer Dunois and rescued, also landed at Cherbourg (H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He*/dk/dx/qs/sk/te/ub/un)

LADYSMITH, hired trawler, 20 August 1917, North Sea - sweeping. Mined, laid by unidentified U-boat, 2 miles N 7?E of North Knock Buoy, damaged, towed to Harwich; no lives lost (D/dk/un)

LADYBIRD, river gunboat - see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign

LANCE, destroyer, 20 March 1916, North Sea - L-class, c1,300t, 3-4in/1mg/4-21in tt, 9th DF Harwich Force, Cdr W Egerton. Taking part in extensive minelaying operation off Thames estuary by four minelayers escorted by Harwich Force destroyers, with diversionary air-raids near Zeebrugge by British, French and Belgian aircraft and seaplane carriers Riviera and Vindex launching attack on German seaplane base on Zeebrugge Mole. Lance's division escorted the carriers and also covered the minelayers, patrolling at 0800 near North Hinder LV. Attacked by three German destroyers, short action left Lance badly damaged but with no lives lost, enemy driven off and minelaying went ahead (Rn/Cn/D/dk)

LANDRAIL, destroyer, 13 December 1916, Dover Straits - UB.29 sunk by destroyer Landrail in Dover Straits off Goodwin Sands, first U-boat sinking by depth charge alone (un – the victim of this attack may have been UC.19 although she was reportedly sunk on 6 December 1916) (dx)

LARCHWOOD, Admiralty collier, 14 January 1916, Bristol Channel - 689grt, built 1910, Middlesbrough-reg, Meteor SS, 13 crew, Mr A Clarke, from Penarth with coal. In collision with SS Argus, sank in a matter of minutes off Bull Point, W of Ilfracombe, Devon (wi - 3 miles N by W of, in 51.14.23N, 04.15.34W); 8 crew drowned as she went down, survivors including captain, mate, two crew picked up by the severely damaged Argus, landed at Newport next morning (H/Lr/wi)

LARGO, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 February 1918, Irish Sea - 1,764grt, built 1910, Pelton SS Co, Newcastle, armed, Mr C Whincop, Barry for Scapa Flow with coal. Torpedoed by UB.105 (Friedrich Strackerjan), sank 12 miles W of Calf of Man island, off Isle of Man (un – 53.52N, 05.02W; wi - in 54N, 05.10W) (H/L/Lr/ms/te/un/wi)

LARK II, armed trawler – see DUSTER, hired trawler, 17 December 1917, Atlantic off SW EnglandLAERTES, destroyer – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

LARKSPUR, fleet sweeping sloop, 5 April 1918, SW Scotland - Acacia-class, 1,200t. In collision with and sank tug Satellite 21grt in Albert harbour, Greenock on the Clyde, tug lost one man (Cn/gr)

LAUREL CROWN, hired drifter, 22 June 1916, Atlantic off N Scotland - 81grt, built 1912, Fraserburgh-reg FR506, hired 12/14 as net drifter, Admiralty No.2050, Skipper John Coull RNR. (un – most sources date her loss on 2 June, the Court of Enquiry established her loss on the 22nd; confirmed by Kindell’s casualty list) – One of nine vessels sweeping area in which cruiser Hampshire was lost - between 58.46N-59.22N and 03.18W-04.39W - passed Brough of Birsay and steering WSW. At 2000, detonated mine laid by U.75 (Kurt Beitzen), foundered west of Orkneys, going down stern first and breaking up (He - 59.05.30N, 03.28.30W; wi - in 59.00N 04W); Skipper and 8 ratings lost, no survivors (H/L/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3138)

LAUREL LEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 17 March 1917, Atlantic off S Ireland - Leaf-class, 5,631grt or 12,300tgrt, built 1916, armed. U-boat attack, torpedo missed (H/D)

LAVEROCK, destroyer – see German Destroyer Raid on Dover Straits, 25 February 1917

LEICESTER, store carrier. 12 February 1916, Dover Straits - (qs - also listed as Q-ship/special service ship), 1,001grt, built 1891, Grimsby-reg, Great Central Railway, hired 12/10/14 as RFA, Pendant No.Y8.23, 24 crew, Mr S Barley, Portsmouth for Cromarty, 600t general cargo. Mined at 1030, laid by UC.6 (Matthias Graf von Schmettow), sank 2 1/2m SE by E of Folkestone Pier, Kent (wi - 51.03.34N 01.16.03E); 17 crew lost, master, six crew saved by trawlers, landed at Dover. Wreck lies broken up at 70ft, ship’s bell recovered in 1986 (H/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/ns/qs/te/un/wi)

LENA MELLING, hired trawler, 23 April 1916, Dover Straits - 274grt, built 1915, Fleetwood-reg FD189, Melling Trawlers, hired 11/15 as minesweeper, 13pdr, Admiralty No.3223, Dover Patrol, Skipper George Horne RNR. (un – 21st) - Mined, laid by UC.7 (Georg Haag), sank near Elbow Light Buoy, off North Foreland or Broadstairs (He - about 1 1/2 miles southwest of the Elbow Light buoy, off Broadstairs); Skipper and 10 ratings lost (He – 10 men lost) (H/L/C/D/dk/dq/fd/un; ADM.1/8454/88)

LENNOX, destroyer, 10 March 1916, presumably North Sea - Lennox, L-class, c1,300t, and Miranda, M-class, c1,100t, destroyers, believed 9th (Cn - 3rd) and 10th DF's respectively, Harwich Force. In collision, damage not known (Cn/D/gr)

LERWICK, hired drifter, 27 March 1916, North Sea - 86grt, built 1908, Yarmouth-reg YH747, hired 12/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.1955, Skipper Samuel Smith RNR. In service as net barrier tender. Heavy gale, driven ashore and wrecked in Yarmouth Roads, Norfolk (wi - in 52.35N, 01.46E); no lives lost (H/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/221)

LEVEN, destroyer, 26 January 1918, Dover Straits - UB.35 sunk by Leven off Calais (dx)

LIBERTY, destroyer, 8 February 1917, Dover Straits - L-class, c1,300t, 3-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, believed 9th DF Harwich Force, possibly on detached service with Dover Patrol. UC.46 running through the English Channel for home, surfaced close by Liberty off the Goodwin Sands, rammed and sunk. Liberty presumably damaged (Cn/D/dx/kt/ub)

LIGHTFOOT [01], flotilla leader – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

LIGHTFOOT [02], flotilla leader, March 1917, North Sea - Lightfoot-class, c1,700t, Harwich Force, and Oberon, destroyer, Repeat M-class, c1,250t, also possibly Harwich Force. March - In collision, possibly North Sea, Lightfoot crushed her bows (Cn/D/gr)

LIMELEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 19 April 1917, English Channel - The Shipping Controller (Lane & MacAndrew), London, Leaf-class, 7,339grt, launched 1916, armed, sailing Port Arthur for Sheerness with fuel oil. Torpedoed and damaged by UB.40 (Hans Howaldt) 10 miles E of Owers LV, towed into Portsmouth; 7 lives lost. Sunk in WW2 (H/L/D/ms/un)

LINCAIRN, Admiralty collier, 27 May 1916, North Sea - 3,638grt, built 1904, Manchester-reg, owned Lincluden SS Co (Sivewright, Bacon), Mr C Jackson, Newcastle for Gibraltar with coal. Mined, laid by UC.10 (Alfred Nitzsche), sank 8 miles N by E of the Shipwash LV, off Orford Ness (L/te/wi - 7 1/2m N by E of, in 52.08.18N, 01.42.39E) (H/L/Lr/ms/te/un/wi)

LINGFIELD, paddle minesweeper – see ALBYN, paddle minesweeper, 2 September 1917, Dover Straits

LLWYNGWAIR, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 April 1918, North Sea - 1,304grt, built 1913, Swansea-reg, Harries Bros, 1-18pdr, 18 crew, Mr J Stevenson, Dunkirk for Newcastle in ballast. UC.64 Ferdinand Schwartz) spotted and fired on by the steamship Abbas, forced to submerge then torpedoed Llwyngwair amidships at 1210, sank immediately 5 miles SSE of Seaham Harbour, Durham (wi - in 55.46N, 01.14.30W); 8 lives lost including master, 10 survivors picked up by Abbas and landed at Sunderland (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

LOBELIA II, hired trawler, 19 April 1917, Atlantic off N Ireland – 184grt, built c1896, Milford-reg M147, Southern Steam Trawling, hired 1914 (D - 4/15) as patrol minesweeper, 13pdr, Admiralty No.974, Skipper Joshua Pratt RNR. Clearing minefield with two other trawlers, just brought one mine to the surface. Hit another mine at 1220, laid by U.78 (Otto Dröscher), sank near Fanad Point, Lough Swilly (He – in 55.18N, 07.45W; wi - in 55.17N, 07.38.15W); Skipper and 10 ratings lost, one survivor (H/L/Lr/C/D/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3274)

LOCH ARD, hired trawler, 10 September 1917, North Sea - 225grt, built 1912, Bon-Accord Steam Fishing Co, Aberdeen-reg A503, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.330, Skipper J Peck RNR.  Sweeping to the SE of Corton lightship paired with trawler Coadjutor. Mined under engine room, laid by UC.14 (Helmut Lorenz), broke in two and sank off Lowestoft, Suffolk (He/un/wi - 1 mile SE of Corton LV, off Lowestoft, in 52.30.20N, 01.52.55E); 5 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3326)

LOCH EYE, hired trawler, Friday 23 February 1917, Atlantic off SW England - 225grt, built 1916, Aberdeen-reg, hired 9/16. In collision with and sank SS Dovrefjell 1,565grt off W coast of Cornwall (D/gr)

LOCH EYE, hired trawler, 20 April 1917, St George's Channel - 225grt, built 1916, Aberdeen-reg A.693, (un – Empire Steam Fishing Co, Aberdeen), hired 9/16 as minesweeper, 16pdr, Admiralty No.2965, Skipper William MacLeod RNR, on patrol. Returning to Dunmore, fourth in line with other trawlers after early morning sweep of the approaches to Waterford, Ireland. Mined at 1035, laid by UC.33 (Martin Schelle), sank rapidly by the stern off Dunmore, Co Waterford (He/un – 1 1/4 miles SW of Hook Point, near Waterford; wi - in 52.09.20N, 06.58.45W); 7 ratings lost, 7 survivors (H/C/D/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3264)

LOCH GARRY, Admiralty trawler, 13 September 1916, Orkneys - 176grt, built c1900, Hartlepool-reg, HL32, J B Graham, hired 1915 (D - 1/16) as auxiliary patrol vessel (He - boom defence vessel), Mate John Winchester. Foundered at moorings off Kirkwall at 0115; Mate, Engineer and 2 MMR lost, only survivor was the boy cook (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/278)

LOCH MORAR, hired trawler – see SISTERS MELVILLE, hired trawler, 13 February 1917, North Sea

LONDON COUNTY, hired drifter, 28 October 1919, North Sea - lost off Beadnell, believed Northumberland, on passage from the White Sea to be released from naval service. No other details (D/He)

LONGBENTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 June 1917, North Sea - 924grt, built 1898, Newcastle-reg, Harris Brothers, 14 crew, Mr J Kinley, Newcastle for Devonport with 1,200t coal, steaming at 7.5kts. Torpedoed by UC.63 (Karsten von Heydebreck) in No.2 hold at 2000, sank by the head in two minutes, 12 miles S by W of Flamborough Head, Yorkshire (te - in 53.55N, 00.03W; wi - 53.53.07N, 00.00.18W); crew picked up by SS Hogarth (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

LONGSET, hired trawler, 6 February 1917, Bristol Channel - 275grt, built 1914, Grimsby-reg GY376, Lindsey Steam Fishing, hired 5/15, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.1503, Auxiliary Patrol parent ship (He – minesweeper), Bristol Channel area, based at Swansea, Lt Thomas Muir RNR. Mined at 1100, laid by UC.46 (Friedrich Moecke), sank off Nells Point, near Barry; Skipper and 7 ratings lost (He – 7 survivors). Note: Lt John Wilson RNR who died on the 20 May 1916 is listed as serving on hired trawler Longset (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/se/un; ADM.137/356)

LORD AIREDALE, hired trawler, 29 November 1916, North Sea - 215grt, built 1911, Grimsby-reg GY910, Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, hired 2/15, 1-12pdr or 3 pdr, Admiralty No.847, used as patrol vessel, believed Harwich-based, Skipper James Gardner RNR. Mined, laid by UC.11 (Max Schmitt), sank off Sunk LV, off Harwich (wi - in 51.54N, 01.20E, also 51.51N, 01.37.30E, listed as GY215); 7 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.1/8474/282)

LORD DERBY, Admiralty chartered collier, 28 December 1917, St George's Channel - 3,757grt, built 1905, Occidental & Oriental Steam Navigation Co, Liverpool, London-reg, armed, Mr Forster, Cardiff for Milford Haven with coal. Torpedoed by U.105 (Friedrich Strackerjan), sank 7 miles SW by S of St. Ann's Head, Pembrokeshire (wi - in 51.34N, 05.16W); three crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

LORD HENEAGE, armed trawler – see OCEAN SCOUT I, hired trawler, 21 December 1917, Atlantic off W Ireland

LORD NELSON, battleship – see SUPERB, dreadnought, 13 November 1918, Turkish Surrender

LORD ORMONDE, believed Admiralty chartered collier, 20 March 1918, Eastern Mediterranean - 3,914grt, built 1899, Davie SB and Repiaring Co, Quebec, Canada, sailing Cardiff /Bizerta for Alexandria. Torpedoed and damaged by Austrian U.40 (Johann Krsnjavi) in Mediterranean (un – in 35.38'N, 13.24'E), arrived Alexandria; no lives lost (H/L/un)

LORD RIDLEY, hired trawler, 10 May 1917, North Sea - 215grt, built 1911, Grimsby-reg GY900, Consolidated Steam Fishing & Ice, hired 2/15 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.850, Skipper William Hodgman RNR. Working off Whitby with trawler Waldorf. Blown up at 1530, mine laid by UC.40 (Gustave Deuerlich), sank off Whitby, Yorkshire (He – in 54.30.40N, 00.37.20W; wi - 54.30N, 00.30W); Skipper and 9 ratings lost, all hands (He – one badly injured survivor picked up) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc/un/wi; ADM.137/445)

LORD STEWART, Admiralty chartered collier, 16 September 1918, English Channel - 1,445grt, built 1905, Sunderland-reg, Marquess of Londonderry, 1-12pdr, 21 crew, from Cherbourg for Barry Roads in ballast. Torpedoed by UB.104 (Thomas Beiber) port-side abreast foremast at 1905, sank almost at once 6 miles E1/2N of Hope's Nose, Torquay, Devon (L/wi – 6 1/2m W1/2S off Hope’s Nose - probably a reciprocal bearing, in 50.29.35N, 03.16.55W); one Spanish seaman drowned, survivors stayed afloat on wreckage, picked by patrol craft and landed at Torquay (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

LOTUSMERE, Admiralty chartered collier, 2 October 1916, Barents Sea - 3,911grt, built 1908, Newcastle-reg, Irismere SS, Barry for Archangel with coal. Captured by U.48 (Berndt Buss), sunk by torpedo 48 miles NNE of Teriberski LH, Kola Peninsula (L/te/un - in 69.58N, 35.50E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

LOWDALE, Admiralty chartered collier, 20 April 1917, Atlantic W of Gibraltar - 2660grt, built 1893, Newcastle-reg, Lowlands SS Co (J Crass & Co), sailing Tyne for Tunis with coal and coke. Captured by U.35 (Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière), sunk by gunfire 90 miles W by N of Gibraltar (L - 50 miles WNW of Cape Spartel) (H/L/Lr/ge/te/un)

LOWTYNE, believed Admiralty chartered collier, 10 June 1918, North Sea - also Low Tyne, ex-Slingsby, miscellaneous Admiralty auxiliary (Cn/D/qs - Submarine decoy or Q-ship), ex-collier, 3,231grt, built 1892, West Hartlepool-reg, Lowland Steam Shipping, hired 7/6grt, built 18, Pendant No.Y3.1512 as collier, 30 crew, Mr H Summerfield, South Shields for Thames with coal, in convoy. Torpedoed by UB.34 (Erich Forste) at 2105, sank in four minutes, 3 1/2m ESE of Whitby, Yorkshire (un – 54.29N, 0.30W; wi - in 54.28.18N, 00.27.12W); 2 ratings lost (wi - 3 naval gunners killed by explosion), one boat lowered, survivors picked up by escort and landed at Whitby. Note: not listed as defensively-armed in HMSO, also only three days between being hired and sunk. Probably served as collier, but role as Q-ship is uncertain (H/J/L/Lr/Cn/D/dk/qs/te/un/wi)

LOYAL FRIEND, hired drifter – see ROSEVINE, hired drifter, 24 May 1917, North Sea

LUCENT, Admiralty chartered collier, 12 February 1917, English Channel - 1,409grt, built 1879, Sunderland-reg, Westoll Line, Mr R Rendall, Cardiff for St Malo with coal, government stores. Captured by UC.66 (Herbert Pustkuchen), sunk by gunfire 20 miles E of Lizard Point, Cornwall (te/wi - in 50.20N, 04.43W) (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

LUCISTON (1), Admiralty chartered collier, 29 November 1916, Central Mediterranean - 2,948grt, built 1910, Glasgow-reg, Luciston SS Co, armed, Cardiff for Gibraltar/Malta with coal. Torpedoed and sunk by UC.22 (Heino von Heimburg) (earlier sources – mined), off Marsa Scirocco Bay, about 4 miles E of Dellamara Point, Malta (H/L/Lr/te/un)

LUCKNOW, hired trawler, 18 May 1917, English Channel - (may be spelt Ludlow), 171grt, built 1903, Hull-reg H739, Hull Steam Fishing, hired 10/14 as minesweeper, 13pdr, Admiralty No.649, Portsmouth based, Skipper George Woodhouse RNR. Mines discovered near Owers LV earlier in the day, with group clearing the area, paired with trawler Waltham. Detonated mine laid by UC.36 (Gustav Buch) that night, sank off Portsmouth; Skipper and 8 ratings lost, all on board (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/hw/un; ADM.137/447)

LULLINGTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 8 February 1917, English Channel - 2816grt, built 1903, London-reg, Southdown SS, 1-12pdr, 26 crew, Mr J Lloyd, Blyth for Rouen with coal. Mined on port-side near No.2 hold at 1800, crew abandoned ship, sank around 1810, 3 miles E of Royal Sovereign LV, off Beachy Head (te - in 50.42.30N, 00.33E; wi - in 50.42.40N, 00.31.30E); survivors in two boats picked up by trawlers and landed at Dover (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

LURCHER, destroyer – see C.17, submarine, May 1917, probably southern British waters

LYDIE, Admiralty chartered collier, 9 February 1918, English Channel - 2,599grt, built 1899, Burdick & Cook, London, 1-12pdr, 26 crew, Mr H Fellingham, Cardiff for Brest with 4,000t coal. Torpedoed by U.53 (Hans Rose) in engine-room at 1445, sank 1 mile E by S of Manacles Buoy, off Falmouth, Cornwall (L - 1 mile E of; wi - in 50.02.38N, 05.01W); chief and 3rd engineers killed by explosion, survivors picked up by patrol vessel and landed at Falmouth (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

LYNFIELD, Admiralty collier, 8 January 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,023grt, built 1905, Stockton-on-Tees-reg, Field SS, Mr Joseph Ellery, armed, Cardiff for Alexandria with coal, coke, railway wagons. Captured by U.35 (Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière), sunk by bombs about 32 miles SE by S of Malta; one crew lost, master taken prisoner. U.35 returned to Cattaro on the 13th with the captains of Lesbian, Mohacsfield, Andoni and Lynfield on board. Note: from Ms Heather Brewer whose grandfather was Master of the Lynfield - “The lightly-armed Lynfield had put up a brave fight, during which the Chief Engineer was killed and several of the crew were injured; Capt Ellery was then taken prisoner, whilst the remainder of the crew, including his 14-year-old son William, were set adrift in boats and eventually rescued. Capt Ellery shouted a farewell message to the crew, which included the words to William, "Tell Mother not to worry." This was later to be the headline in an edition of the Daily Mirror, followed by the phrase, "Pirates capture Captain". Capt Ellery spent the remainder of the War in a prisoner of war camp in Austria; after the War he was appointed in command of the SS Vologda, but after two voyages had to give up, his health completely ruined by the harsh regime of the prison camp. He died at the age of 49 in 1920” (+L/Lr/Mn/hb/te/un)


M

M.15, monitor – see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign

M.25, monitor – see BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits

M.29, monitor - see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign

M.31, monitor - see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign

M.32, monitor - see GRAFTON , bulged cruiser, 30 October 1917, Palestine Campaign

MACAW, hired trawler – see ALBION II, hired trawler, 13 January 1916, English Channel

MADRYN, Admiralty chartered collier, 16 September 1918, Atlantic off SW England - 2,244grt, built 1916, Newport-reg, Mervyn SS, 1-90mm, 23 crew, Mr J Harris, Penarth for Devonport with coal. Torpedoed by U.82 (Heinrich Middendorff) port-side in No.1 hold at 0300 blowing up the whole forepart, sank within 10min, 5 miles NNE of Trevose Head, Cornwall (un/wi - in 50.38N, 05.01W); crew got away in two boats - master’s landed at Stanbury Mouth, 10 miles N of Bude, chief officer's picked up by French SS Therese and landed at Swansea (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

MAJESTIC II, patrol paddle steamer, 28 July 1916, Western Mediterranean - 408grt, built 1901, Weymouth-reg, Cosens & Co, hired 23/5/16 as auxiliary patrol vessel, 2-6pdr AA, Pendant No.0107. Sprang a leak, foundered near Oran, Algeria; no lives lost (H/J/Lr/C/D/He/dk)

MALAYA, dreadnought, 22 November 1918, location not known - Queen Elizabeth class, 27,500t, 5th BS Grand Fleet. Run into by destroyer Penn 1,025t, port quarter damaged, location not known but probably northern Home waters (D/gr)

MALTBY, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 February 1918, Central Mediterranean - 3,977grt, built 1906, Sir R Ropner & Co, West Hartlepool-reg, armed, Cardiff for Malta with coal. Torpedoed by UC.27 (Otto Gerke), sank 10 miles SW by S of Pantellaria island, off Tunisia (L - 9 miles S of); five crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MANICA, kite balloon ship – see MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign

MANLEY, destroyer – see TB.9, torpedo boat, 26 July 1916, North Sea

MANSURI, Admiralty collier, 17 November 1916, North Sea - 3,227grt, built 1894, Bombay-reg, Bombay & Persia Steam Navigation, sailed South Shields on 17th with sealed orders for St Nazaire, went missing, “not since heard of”, posted by Lloyds 21/3/17, “not reported passing Downs” in the Dover Strait. On or after 17th - Lost with all hands, presumably in North Sea (H/L/Lr/dx, Casualty list, dated 17th – 2 naval ratings only)

MANTIS [01], river gunboat, 8 March 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign - Second attempt to relieve British-Indian forces at Kut failed the same day, new "China" or Insect-class river gunboat Mantis took part with the smaller Fly-class Butterfly, Cranefly, Dragonfly, Mayfly, Sawfly (dx)

MANTIS [02], river gunboat, 24 February 1917, Mesopotamian Front - After months of preparation by British/Indian forces followed by a steady push up the River Tigris, the Second Battle for Kut took place 22nd-23rd and the town found abandoned on the 24th, river gunboats taking part included Insect-class Mantis, Moth, Tarantula and Fly-class Butterfly, Gadfly, Snakefly (dx)

MANTIS [03], river gunboat, 26 February 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign - Mantis, Moth, Tarantula, Insect-class, 645t, 2-6in/2-12pdr/6mg and Butterfly, Gadfly and one other, Fly-class, 98t, 1-4in/1-12pdr/1-6pdr/1-3pdr AA/1-2pdr/4 or 5mg, all river gunboats. Following the capture of Kut the River Flotilla (Capt Nunn) was given permission to pursue the retreating Turks. After passing Bughaila the three "Insects" came under heavy, short-range fire from the Turkish rearguard, Moth hit eight times by artillery, once through, the gunboats continued to harrass the Turks and recaptured river gunboat Firefly which was put back into service, and it is believed gunboat Sumana. The advance on Baghdad continued. In this action Mantis lost 1 rating killed, 1 DOW, Moth, 2 ratings killed, Tarantula, 1 rating killed, no lives lost in Butterfly and Gadfly (Cn/D/dk/gb/nh)

MANTIS [04], river gunboat, 8 March 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign - British-Indian forces captured Baghdad by the 11th, river gunboats Mantis, Moth, Tarantula and Butterfly, Firefly, Gadfly, Snakefly took part (dx)

MANZANITA, hired drifter, 6 September 1916, Adriatic Sea - 93grt, built 1911, Lowestoft-reg LT1113, hired 1916 (D - 1/15) as net drifter, Admiralty No.1038, Otranto barrage base ship at Brindisi, shifting base to Taranto and on passage. Ran aground on Ugenti Rocks and badly damaged, written off; no lives lost. (Note: probably the Secche d'Ugenta or di Ugento reef, just NW of Santa Maria di Leuca within the Gulf of Taranto i.e. just beyond the S Adriatic; Hepper lists the Ugenti rocks as outside Bari i.e. in the Adriatic (H/C/D/He/dk; ADM.137/2121)

MAPLELEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 21 October 1917, Atlantic - ex-Rangol, ex-dummy battleship No.7 “Marlborough”, ex-merchant ship Mount Royal, 8,039grt, armed. U-boat attack, torpedo missed (H/D)



MARCELLA, hired yacht, 24 March 1916, Dover Straits -160tym/127grt, built 1887, hired 6/7/15 as armed boarding steamer, Pendant No.MI.25 from 1/16, probably commissioned, Dover Patrol. In collision, sank in The Downs between Deal and Goodwin Sands (H - in North Sea; He - ENE of Gull light vessel, in the Downs, in 51.14.44N 01.26.08E – wreck found); no lives lost (J+/C/D/He/dk/dq; ADM.137/221)

MARGAM ABBEY, Admiralty collier, 10 April 1916, Atlantic off SW England - 4,471grt, built 1907, Port Talbot-reg, Margam Abbey SS, Bordeaux for Barry Roads in ballast. Captured by U.66 (Thowald von Bothmer), sunk by gunfire 55 miles SW1/4S of Lizard Point, Cornwall (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MARGARET (RCN), patrol vessel – see HALIFAX HARBOUR EXPLOSION, 6 December 1917

MARGIT (1), Q-ship, 17 January 1916, Central Mediterranean - (Cn/D - operated as Thornhill, aka Margit, Wellholme, Werribee, Wonganella; qs - Wonganella, aka Thornhill), cargo steamship/collier Thornhill, 3,848grt, built 1911, Taylor & Sanderson, Sunderland, taken over as Admiralty collier Pendant No.Y3.859, in service from 18/11/15 as Q-ship/special service ship, Lt-Cdr G Hodgeson. Received Baron Napier's signal, hoisted Dutch colours and headed for the area, spotted by submarine, few shots fired and ordered to stop, panic party left and submarine submerged to check out her identity, surfaced again at which point Margit opened fire. U.35 (Lothar von Arnauld de la Perière) was not hit, went back down again, fired torpedo and headed away. One Chief Petty Officer killed (D/dk/md/ms/qs)

MARGIT (2), Admiralty chartered collier, 4 April 1917, Mediterranean - 2,490grt, built 1903, London-reg, Groedel Bros SS, armed, from Malta with coal. Torpedoed by U.63 (Otto Schultze), sank 80 miles SW1/2W of Cape Matapan, Greece (L/te - in 35.28N, 21.24E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MARIE SUZANNE, Admiralty chartered collier, 19 August 1918, Aegean Sea - 3,106grt, built 1898, London-reg, Leander SS, armed, Penarth for Mudros/Salonika with coal. Torpedoed by UC.37 (Otto Kumpel), sank 47 miles W3/4S of Mudros Bay, island of Lemnos (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MARION, hired trawler, 23 February 1918, Central Mediterranean - 128grt, built 1891, Dundee-reg DE14, Dundee Steam Trawling, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.20, Skipper John Wood Watt RNR, with Lt Joseph King RNR, Minesweeping Officer, Malta Trawlers embarked. Sweeping the Marsa Scirocco channel off Malta with trawler Hercules III, spent morning off Filfola island. Mined at 1310, laid by unidentified U-boat, sank rapidly (He – in 35.45N, 14.23 E); 1 officer, 5 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dx/sc/un; ADM.137/3472)

MARNE, destroyer – see KING EDWARD VII, predreadnought, 6 January 1916, Atlantic N of Scotland

MARS, battleship – see PRINCE GEORGE, battleship, 8 January 1916, Aegean Sea

MARSHAL NEY, monitor – see GERMAN DESTROYER RAID ON RAMSGATE, 26 April 1917

MARSTONMOOR, Admiralty chartered collier, 14 April 1918, Atlantic off N Scotland - 2,744grt, built 1906, London-reg, Moor Line, armed, Barry/Milford Haven for Murmansk/Archangel with mails, coal, general cargo. Torpedoed by U.107 (Kurt Slevogt), sank 55 miles NNE of Cape Wrath (te/un - in 59.34N, 04.54W) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MARVEL, destroyer, 2 June 1917, British waters - Marvel and Menace, destroyers, Repeat M-class, c1,250t, Grand Fleet Flotillas. In collision, no other details, bows of Menace stove in (Cn/gr)

MARY ROSE, destroyer – see TULIP, convoy sloop, 30 April 1917, Atlantic W of Ireland

MASTIFF, destroyer, 30 May 1917, Dover Straits - M-class, 1,010t, had served with Harwich Force, now Dover Patrol. Ran ashore under Shakespeare Cliff, Dover, refloated the following day (Cn/dp/dq/gr)

MASTON, Admiralty chartered collier, 13 August 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,881grt, built 1912 (L - 5,881grt), Thomas & Appleton Shipping Co, Cardiff, armed, sailing Cardiff/Malta for Taranto with coal, stores. Torpedoed by Austrian U.XXVIII (Zdenko Hudecek), sank 35 miles ENE of Cape Spartivento, Italy (L - in 38.12N, 16.43E; un – 38.25N, 16.43E); two crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MATCHLESS {01], destroyer – see TB.9, torpedo boat, 26 July 1916, North Sea

MATCHLESS [02], destroyer, 9 November 1916, North Sea - M-class, c1,100t, Harwich Force. Mined and damaged off Southwold, mine laid by unidentified U-boat; no casualties listed (un only)

MATCHLESS [03], destroyer, 29 May 1917, probably Dover Straits - M-class, 1,010t, had served with Harwich Force, now Dover Patrol. In collision with unknown vessel, gradually sinking, towed into Dover and beached in the harbour. Wedged upright, refloated next high water and entered floating dock for repairs (Cn/dp/dq/gr)

MATCHLESS [04], destroyer – see BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits

MAVIS [01], Q-ship, 10 May 1917, Eastern Atlantic - First trial convoy sailed from Gibraltar for UK, 16 ships escorted by submarine decoy/Q-ships Mavis (Q.26) and Rule (Q.35), convoys started regularly in July (dx)

MAVIS [02], Q-ship, 3 June 1917, English Channel - ex-Nyroca, aka Nyroca, Nyorca, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, cargo steamship, 1,290grt, built 1903, Cork SS Co, Cork, entered service (D - 31/1/17; qs - 19/3/17) as decoy ship Q.26, 1-4in/2-12pdr, Cdr Adrian Keyes, carrying timber as buoyant cargo. Torpedoed (un – by UC.29 or UC.66) amidships in the engine room at 2145, 20 miles S of Wolf Rock, engine-room and stokehold flooded, wireless wrecked. Distress rockets fired, destroyer Christopher, trawler Whitefriars and two tugs came out, Christopher took off most of the crew, towed by the tugs in succession, list reached 45°, beached in Cawsand Bay, near Plymouth (L - on the 4th), refloated, "paid off into dockyard hands" 30/6/17; one engineering officer and 3 firemen killed by torpedo explosion (L/Cn/D/kt/qs/sk/un)

MAVISBROOK, Admiralty chartered collier, 17 May 1918, Western Mediterranean - 3,152grt, built 1912, Glasgow-reg, Steam Ship Treganna, armed, Cardiff for Malta with coal. Torpedoed and sunk by UB.50 (Franz Becker), 50 miles SE by S1/2S from Cape de Gata, near Almeria (L/un - in 36.05N, 01.35W; un – also 36.12N, 1.34W); 18 crew lost including master (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MAYFLY, river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1916, Mesopotamian Campaign

MECHANICIAN, Admiralty commissioned escort ship, 20 January 1918, English Channel - cargo ship, 9,044grt, built 1900, Charente SS Co (T & J Harrison), Liverpool-reg, hired 4/17, 2-6in QF/2-4in QF, commissioned 20/6/17, Pendant No.MI.98, 101 crew, Master James Nicholson, sailing London for Plymouth with government stores. Attacked by submerged UB.35 (Karl Stöter) at 0250, torpedoed in No 6 hold, 8 miles W of St Catherine's Point, Isle of Wight (L - between Needles and St Catherine’s Point), 30 minutes later hit a second time, in the boiler room, made entrance to Needles Channel with tug assistance and grounded on Shingles Bank, Hunt Castle (wi - in 50.40.13N, 01.36.20W), abandoned. Vessel broke in two by end of 1918 and partly buried, wreck dispersed in 1922, lies 311º 7.8 cables from Needles LH; 3 officers and 13 ratings lost (He – 3 officers and 10 ratings) (H/J/L/Lr/C/Cn/D/He/dx/ge/te/un/wi; ADM137/4009)

MEDEA, destroyer - BELGIUM COAST OPERATIONS, 24 April 1916, North Sea

MEDIATOR, hired trawler, 2 January 1916, North Sea - 178grt, built 1912, Aberdeen-reg A483, A Forbes & Sons, hired 9/14 as auxiliary patrol vessel (He – as minesweeper), Admiralty No.509, Skipper R Pool (He - Skipper Albert Barker RNR), weather “bitterly cold and blowing hard with a rough sea”. Sweeping area SE of Flamborough Head with other trawlers. Mined and badly damaged, close to sinking, skipper and four men remained aboard patching and pumping, water gained and they only left when the deck was awash, foundered minutes later off Hornsea, S of Flamborough Head (He – taken in tow by trawler Bona Dea, settled steadily and foundered about 1 1/2 miles from Spurn Light); no lives lost. Crew taken off by Bona Dea (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/sc; ADM.137/3140)

MELAMPUS, destroyer – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

MELDON, Admiralty chartered collier, 3 March 1917, off W Scotland - 2,514grt, built 1902, Newcastle-reg, Dawson SS, Mr Wadleigh, from Cardiff/Penarth with coal. Mined, laid by U.78 (Otto Droscher), damaged off Mull, 1/2m N of Garvelloch, Firth of Lorne (wi - Rubha Dubh, W entrance to Loch Buie, Isle of Mull, in 56.19.32N, 05.55.33W, master tried to run her ashore in Loch Buie, grounded in shallows off Maol na Croige), declared total loss; all crew safely ashore (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

MELITA, salvage vessel – see TRYPHON destroyer, 4 May 1919, Aegean

MELPOMENE, destroyer - BELGIUM COAST OPERATIONS, 24 April 1916, North Sea

MENACE, destroyer – see MARVEL, destroyer, 2 June 1917, British waters

MERCURY [01], paddle minesweeper, 26 April 1917, North Sea - 378grt, built 1892, hired 21/12/15. Mined and damaged, laid by UC.11 (Benno von Ditfurth) 3 miles ENE of Sunk LV, in 51.55'N, 01.44'E; no lives lost, no casualties reported by Kindell. An account in "Swept Channels" refers to "Sweeping off Sunk LV (26 April 1917?), brought up three mines in sweep, they exploded and blew off her stern, bow portion towed into harbour and new stern fitted Once repaired she returned to service, on first sweep (7 June 1917?) this time lost her bows around the same position; 2 crew lost on this latter occasion." Kindell also refers to "Possibly mined and damaged in North Sea for "second time" in 1917, on or before 27 September 1917; one crew DOW." (Cn/D/dk/sc/un)

MERCURY [02], paddle minesweeper, 7 June 1917, North Sea - 378grt, built 1892, hired 21/12/15. Mined and damaged, laid by UC.6 (Werner Lowe) on 6 June, about 4 miles NE of Sunk LV, in 51.54'N, 01.41'E; two engine room crew killed. An account in "Swept Channels" refers to "Sweeping off Sunk LV (26 April 1917?), brought up three mines in sweep, they exploded and blew off her stern, bow portion towed into harbour and new stern fitted Once repaired she returned to service, on first sweep (7 June 1917?) this time lost her bows around the same position; 2 crew lost on this latter occasion." Kindell also refers to "Possibly mined and damaged in North Sea for "second time" in 1917, on or before 27 September 1917; one crew DOW." (Cn/D/dk/sc/un)

MEROPS, Q-ship, July 1917, possibly British waters - ex-Maracaibo, aka Bellmore, Ilma, Imperiuse, Maracaibo, Steady, Toofa, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, auxiliary barquentine, 324grt, built 1892, entered service 2/2/17 as Q.28, 1-4in/2-12pdr. July - Engine backfire started a blaze; “Q-ships” (also sk) gives two accounts of the casualties (1) engineer overcome by fumes, 2nd engineer burnt by exploding paraffin tank, two crew overcome by gas from burning Lyddite ammunition, (2) eight crew badly gassed by burning Lyddite; no lives lost (Cn/D/dk/qs/sk)

MERSE, Admiralty trawler, 22 May 1917, off SW Scotland - 296grt, built 1914, Fleetwood-reg FD62, Mersey Steam Trawlers (Taylor & Tomlinson), hired 2/15 as minesweeper, 112pdr, Admiralty No.980, Skipper Frederick Beckett RNR in command, Lt Fane RNR, “senior officer’s ship of trawlers”, on passage with dreadnought Ramillies, sailing Clyde to Liverpool for repair to bottom, stern-post and both rudders damaged during launching. Total force consisted of 8 towing tugs and screen of 8 minesweepers, 6 destroyers and 8 trawlers, Merse had helped clear submarine-laid mines off the Clyde before the sailing, part of inner screen, passed Cumbrae Light at 1300. At 1430, 6 miles further on, about one mile off the port bow of Ramillies, detonated another mine, laid by UC.65 (Otto Steinbrinck) and “blown to atoms” off Garroch Head, Isle of Bute, off Firth of Clyde; 2 officers and 15 ratings lost, no survivors (sc - all 15 crew lost) (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/fd/sc/un/wi)

MERSEY, monitor, 4 September 1916 German East Africa Campaign - British-Indian forces captured Dar-es-Salaam, Inshore Squadron monitors Mersey, Severn, gunboat Thistle, armed tug Helmuth took part supported by Main Squadron consisting of predreadnought Vengeance, old light cruisers Challenger, Hyacinth, Talbot, armed whalers Charon, Childers, Echo, Fly, Styx, Pickle, kite balloon ship Manica, fleet messenger Trent. Armed merchant cruiser Himalaya, armed whalers Prattler, Salamander, sloop Rinaldo were also present (dx)

METEOR, destroyer, 13 March 1917, Dover Straits - M-class, 1,010t, Dover Patrol. Mined, no other details, "succeeded in getting her to Dover". Note: not listed in U-boat.net as U-boat-laid mine (Cn/D/dp/dq/un)

MICHAEL [01], destroyer, 15 March 1918, off Northern Ireland - U.110 sunk by destroyers Michael and Moresby (dx)

MICHAEL [02], destroyer, 27 March 1916, North Sea - Repeat M-class, c1,250t, Grand Fleet flotillas. In collision just before daylight with another destroyer S of Pentland Firth off Noss Head, Michael damaged (Cn/gf/gr)

MICHAELMAS DAISY, hired drifter, 26 November 1916, Southern Adriatic area - 99grt, built 1913, Lowestoft-reg LT136, hired 9/15 as net drifter, Admiralty No.1910, Otranto Barrage drifter line, Lt Alexander Miller RNR, Skipper George Lincoln. Stationed off Cape Santa Maria de Leuca. Mined at 1800, laid by UC.14 (Alfred Klatt) laid five days before, sank near Santa Maria di Leuca, SE Italy. No trace was found of her (L - sunk by surface ship in Strait of Dover); both officers and 9 ratings lost (He/ap - 2 officers, 10 men; un – all hands) (H/L/D/He/ap/dk/un; ADM.137/3178)

MILLICENT KNIGHT, Admiralty chartered collier, 18 May 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,563grt, built 1900, Cardiff-reg, W & C T Jones SS Co (W & C T Jones), armed, sailing Cardiff/Malta for Port Said with coal and government stores. Torpedoed by UC.20 (Hans Adalbert von der Lühe), sank 130 miles E by S1/2S of Malta (L/te/un - in 35.37N, 17.13E); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MILLY, Admiralty chartered collier, 6 September 1918, Atlantic off SW England - 2,964grt, built 1904, London-reg, Steam Ship Elmgrove, 1-4in, 33 crew, Brest for Barry Roads in ballast, zig-zagging alone at 10kts. Torpedoed by UB.87(Karl Petri) port-side level with No.3 hold at 1355, apparently broke in two and sank in five minutes, 2 1/4m W3/4S of Tintagel Head, Cornwall (L - 10 miles N of Trevose Head; wi - in 50.30.36N, 04.51.50W); two boats launched but stern went down so quickly the men on the after part went into the sea and two drowned, survivors picked up after about 15min by SS Madame Brooke, landed at Swansea (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

MILNE [01], destroyer - BELGIUM COAST OPERATIONS, 24 April 1916, North Sea

MILNE [02], destroyer, 9 May 1917, Dover Straits - M-class, 1,010t, had served with Harwich Force, now Dover Patrol. Rammed submerging UC.26 (dx/un - in 51.03N, 01.40E), then depth-charged and finished off by two other destroyers, Milne left with a “badly distorted stem and pieces of the U-boat’s casing embedded in her forecastle” (Cn/D/dq/dx/ub/un)

MILO, Admiralty chartered collier, 22 May 1917, English Channel - 1,475grt, built 1903, Swansea-reg, Letricheux Line, 16 crew, Mr Thomas Oxland, Rouen for Cardiff in ballast. In collision with unidentified steamship, foundered 10 miles S of St Albans Head, Dorset (wi - 21 miles SSW of Anvil Point, in 50.24.36N, 02.03.24W) (H/Lr/wi)

MIMI [01], armed motor boat – see TOUTOU, armed motor boat, 14 January 1916, German East Africa Campaign

MIMI [02], gunboat, 9 February 1916, German East Africa Campaign - Gunboats Mimi and Fifi (ex-German Kingani) attacked and sank gunboat Hedwig von Weissman on Lake Tanganyika, control of the long lake between Belgian Congo and German East Africa passed into Allied hands (dx)

MINIEH, Admiralty chartered collier, 9 January 1917, Central Atlantic - ex-Alsatia, c3,806grt, built 1876, London-reg, Khedivial Mail Steam Shipping & Graving Dock, supplying Royal Navy warships hunting for raiders, coaled light cruiser Amethyst on 7th, still sailing with cargo of coal. Captured by Möwe, sunk by bombs and “a shell or two” 170 miles ENE true from Pernambuco (L - in 07.03N, 32.10W). Note: “Wreck Index” lists Minieh, ex-Alsatia, 2,890grt, built 1876, sunk in 1915 as a Scapa Flow blockship. Perhaps she was earmarked as a blockship in 1915, but taken back into service due to the lack of shipping (+L/Lr/Mn/kp)

MIRA, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler 11 October 1917, English Channel - 3,700grt, built 1901, Mira SS Co, Newcastle, armed, Port Arthur for Dover with fuel oil. Mined, laid by UC.50 (Rudolf Seuffer), sank 4 miles SW1/2W of Beachy Head, Sussex (te/un - in 50.41N, 00.09E; un – also 4 miles off) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MIRANDA, destroyer – see LENNOX, destroyer, 10 March 1916, presumably North Sea

MIRANDA III, hired trawler, 14 January 1918, Orkneys - 173grt, built 1906, Hull-reg H875, Hellyers Steam Fishing, hired 1916, 1-6pdr (D - hired 9/14, 1-3pdr), fitted as a minesweeper, Admiralty No.601, Skipper Samuel Ash RNR. Sailing in strong northerly gale with snow squalls. (He – 13th, probably night of 13th/14th) – Ran aground late at night, holed and flooded, broke up and abandoned as wreck in Pelwick Bay (it was initially concluded this was possibly Perwick Bay, near Port St Mary, Isle of Man; hw - Pelwich Bay). Hepper locates her loss W of Stromness, Mainland Island, Orkney, in 58.56N 03.20W; no lives lost (H/Lr/C/D/dk/hw; ADM.137/684)

ML.19, motor launch, 31 January 1916, North Sea - ML.1-50 series, Lt Gilbert George RNVR. Petrol explosion and destroyed by fire at Harwich (He - lying at Shotley), Essex, home of Harwich Force; no lives lost (H/J/C/Cn/D/He/dk; ADM.137/211)

ML.38, motor launch, c18 June 1916, Palestine Campaign - ML.1-50 series, also hired trawler Earl Kitchener, 348grt, built 1915, Hull-reg, hired 10/15. Possibly 18th - RFC carried out bombing attack on aerodromes at El Arish, Sinai peninsula, 3 trawlers and 2 ML's stationed along coast to assist, ML.38 rescued a pilot who came down in the sea, both ships attacked by enemy aircraft (D/ap/ch)

ML.40, motor launch, 18 May 1916, Eastern Mediterranean - ML.1-50 series. Lying at Port Said, Egypt on the Suez Canal, accidentally destroyed by fire; no lives lost (H/J/Cn/D/dk; ADM.137/335)

ML.55, motor launch, 28 January 1918, Thames Estuary - ML.51 series, Lieutenant Cecil Cochrane RNVR. Being refitted at yard of Messrs Wills and Packham, Sittingbourne, Kent, destroyed by fire; no lives lost (H/J/Cn/D/He/dk; ADM.1/849/190)

ML.81, motor launch, early 1917, North Sea - ML.51 series, Lt Hugh Hunter RNVR i/c, Canadian Lt John Hunter RNVR (no relation) 2nd i/c, served mainly in North Sea. Early 1917 - Destroyed by petrol fire, probably in Aberdeen, but possibly Peterhead according to Lt John Hunter's son, not listed as lost in other sources, perhaps damaged and repaired (D/ah)

ML.97, mtoro launch, circa late 1918/1919 - one of two ML's sold in damaged condition, not known when, where or how damaged (Cn/D)

ML.98, motor launch, circa late 1918/1919 - one of three ML's lost after the Armistice, cause and date not known (D)

ML.121, motor launch, 22 December 1918, English Channel - Elco-built motor launch, ML.51 series. Two ML's included in Jane's War Loss Section and lost off French coast. They were part of a group of ten sailing from Portsmouth on the 21st, due to arrive at Le Havre before midnight on passage to make up the Rhine Flotilla. Weather worsened with strong northwesterly gale and high seas, boats labouring; ML.121, served in Dover Patrol, Lieutenant John William Robinson RNVR. In collision with another of the ML's, started to ship water, crew taken of, and foundered at night off the Seine Bank, 15 miles W of Le Havre; no lives lost (J/Cn/D/He/dk/dq; ADM.137/938); ML.566, Lieutenant Hans Hamilton Morrison RNVR. Swamped and filled with water, crew taken off by and escort, and abandoned 10 miles NW off Cape Barfleur, E of Cherbourg; no lives lost. Could not be found and assumed to have foundered (J/Cn/D/He/dk; ADM.137/938)

ML.127, motor launch, circa late 1918/1919 - one of two ML's sold in damaged condition, not known when, where or how damaged (Cn/D)

ML.152, motor launch, 2 January 1920, Baltic Sea - ML.51 series. Grounded on southern Oland island, Sweden, presumably wrecked (Cn/D)

ML.196, motor launch, circa late 1918/1919 - one of three ML's lost after the Armistice, date not known; caught fire and sank (Cn/D)

ML.197, motor launch, 31 January 1917, St George's Channel - ML.50 series, Lieutenant Alan Skinner RNVR. Based at Queenstown (Cork), on patrol between Carnsore Point and Helwick Head, strong southeasterly gale. Driven ashore and wrecked near Ballinacourty LH, Co Waterford; no lives lost. Engines, gun and stores salvaged (+J/Cn/D/He/dk; ADM.137/533)

ML.229, motor launch, 15 September 1919, Western Germany - ML.51 series, one of 11 ML’s on the Rhine in 1919. Almost destroyed by petrol explosion and fire; 1 rating killed. Not repaired, sold in damaged condition (J/Cn/D/dk)

ML.230 - see INVERBERVIE, Admiralty collier, 14 September 1916, Central Mediterranean

ML.253 - see INVERBERVIE, Admiralty collier, 14 September 1916, Central Mediterranean

ML.255 - see INVERBERVIE, Admiralty collier, 14 September 1916, Central Mediterranean

ML.278, motor launch, Tuesday 15 January 1918, Dover Straits - ML.50 series, Dover Patrol, Lieutenant Anthony Mackie RNVR. Wrecked in galeforce winds on Dunkirk Pier; no lives lost. See also hired drifter Ethnee (H/J/Cn/D/He/dk/dq)

ML.421, motor launch, 6 April 1918, North Sea - ML.51 series, Lieutenant Stanley Gibb Jones RNVR. Wrecked in Seaford Bay (D - collision off Whitby, Yorkshire; He - grounded at low water in Seaford Bay near Whitby); salvage attempts failed, stripped and abandoned; no lives lost (H/J/Cn/D/He/dk; ADM.1/8496/190)

ML.434, motor launch, 21 November 1919, Central Europe - ML.51 series. Caught fire on the Danube river, no other details; 1 rating killed (Cn/D/dk)

ML.474, motor launch, 23 July 1917, Aegean Sea - ML.51 series, Lieutenant John Alexander Miller RNVR. On patrol for small craft reported passing through the Khios straits, between Khios and the Turkish mainland. On the night of the 22nd, ran aground on Kumuthi Sigleri, rocks on SE side of the straits and could not be got off. Came under fire on the morning of the 23rd, hit by Turkish shell and destroyed by fire off Turkish coast; no lives lost (H/J/Cn/D/He/dk/un; ADM.137/399)

ML.521, motor launch, circa late 1918/1919 - one of three ML's lost after the Armistice, date not known; caught fire and sank at Portsmouth (Cn/D)

ML.534, motor launch, 13 April 1917, Central Mediterranean - ML.51 series, Lt Samuel G Hill RNVR. One of four ML's that arrived at Taranto, Italy on 31 March as deck cargo on merchantman Bellview, offloaded and prepared for passage to Aegean. While fitting out at Taranto, there was an explosion on ML.534 followed by a fire which destroyed her; Lt Hill died, 2 officers and 4 ratings injured (H/J/Cn/D/dk; ADM.137/2122)

ML.540, motor launch, 8 June 1917, Atlantic off NW Morocco - Two ML's lost in attack on British steamship by U.39 (Walter Forstmann) off Cape Spartel, near Tangier: HUNTSTRICK, 8,151grt, built 1902, Shipping Controller (F C Strick & Co), London, armed, sailing London for Salonica with troops, government stores and naval motor launches. Torpedoed and sunk 80 miles WNW of (L - 53 miles NW of; un – in 35.52N, 06.47W); 15 lives lost including master and one naval mechanic (H/L/dk/te/un); ML.540, ML.541, motor launches, ML.51 series, being transported to Salonica as deck cargo on SS Huntstrick, probably with crews as passengers, lost when she went down. Note: ML's were normally carried four at a time; not known if Hunstrick was only carrying two or if another two floated off and were saved (H/J/L/Cn/D/He/un, ADM.137/2962)

ML.541, motor launch – see ML.540, motor launch, 8 June 1917, Atlantic off NW Morocco

ML.566, motor launch – see ML.121, motor launch, 22 December 1918, English Channel

MONKSTONE, Admiralty chartered collier, 25 July 1917, Atlantic off SW England - 3,097grt, built 1909, Scarisbrick SS Co, Cardiff, armed, Tyne/Shields for Gibraltar with coal. Torpedoed by U.82 (Hans Adam), sank 240 miles W of Bishop Rock, Scillies; one crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)MORAVIA, trawler – see SYLVIA, destroyer, 29 September 1917, North Sea off Shetlands

MORESBY, destroyer – see MICHAEL, destroyer, 15 March 1918, off Northern Ireland

MORNING STAR, hired drifter – see FREUCHNY, hired drifter, 8 January 1916, Adriatic Sea

MOROCOCOLA, hired trawler, 19 November 1917, Atlantic off S Ireland - 265grt, built 1915, James F Duthie (un – John Lewis & Sons), Aberdeen-reg A238, hired 1916 (D - 4/15), 16pdr, Admiralty No.2656,  Lieutenant Alexander Allan RNR. One of eight trawlers ordered to sweep area near Daunt LV, near Queenstown (Cobh), following report of floating mine, paired with Indian Empire and started sweeping. Mined at 0830, field laid by UC.31 (Kurt Siewert), there was a second explosion, probably her boiler and she sank in seconds off Daunt Rock LV (un – 3 miles SE by S of), off Roches Point, Co Cork; 1 officer, 13 ratings lost, no survivors,  (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un; ADM.137/3267)

MORRIS, destroyer – see BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits

MOSS, hired drifter – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

MOTAGUA [01], armed merchant cruiser, 29 January 1917, Atlantic off Shetlands - 5,977grt, built 1912, hired 21/11/14, 10th CS, warned of submarine in 60.32N, 01.55W on 28th, heading for squadron's coaling base of Swarbacks Minn. Torpedo fired at 0730, 8 miles from Esha Ness, missed(Mn/D)

MOTAGUA [02], armed merchant cruiser, 16 March 1917, Atlantic off Shetlands - 5,977grt, built 1912, hired 21/11/14, 10th CS. Mined, laid by U.80 (Alfred von Glasenapp) 6 1/2m from Esha Ness (Barrage 39 or 39A), considerably damaged but reached Swarbacks Minn, originally reported torpedoed but sweepers found three mines near the position. On this occasion she lost her stern, in another mining, date unknown, bows were blown off; no deaths in either incident (Mn/D/bi/dk/ge/un)

MOTAGUA [03], armed merchant cruiser, 19 March 1918, North Atlantic - 5,977grt, built 1912, hired 21/11/14, detached from 10th CS as convoy escort. In collision with escorting USS Manley 1,187t off the Irish coast, depth charges detonated destroying the destroyer’s stern, Motagua damaged; 3 officers, 25 crew killed on Motagua, as many as 89 on Manley (Rn/D/dk/dn/gr/www)

MOTH [01], river gunboat - see MANTIS, river gunboat, 24 February 1917, Mesopotamian Front

MOTH [02], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 26 February 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

MOTH [03], river gunboat – see MANTIS, river gunboat, 8 March 1917, Mesopotamian Campaign

MOUNTPARK, Admiralty chartered collier, 21 August 1917, Bristol Channel - 1,376grt, built 1912, Greenock-reg, Denholm Line Steamers, 20 crew, Mr D Richards, Newport for Dover with coal. In collision with Greek SS Alexandria, foundered 1 1/2m N of Lundy Is, off Devon (wi - on 24th, 6 miles NW by N1/2N Bull Point, in 51.16.36N, 04.18.15W); five crew lost (H/Lr/wi)

MUNIFICENT, Admiralty chartered collier, 1 March 1917, Dover Straits - 3,270grt, built 1892, Sunderland-reg, Westoll Line, armed, Tyne for Dunkirk with coal. Torpedoed by unknown U-boat (un – possibly mined), sank 3 1/2m NNW of Cape Gris Nez, N of Boulogne (L/te - in 50.55N, 01.32E); three crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

MUREX, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 21 December 1916, Eastern Mediterranean - 3,664grt, built 1892, first tanker built for future Shell fleet, London-reg, Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Co, armed (sl - Admiralty oiler No.111, presumably Y7.111), Mudros for Port Said in water ballast. Torpedoed by U.73 (Gustav Siess), sank 94 miles NW of Port Said, Egypt (L/te - in 32.20N, 31E); one crew lost (H/L/Lr/sl/te/un)

MURIEL, Admiralty chartered collier, 17 September 1918, North Sea - 1,831grt, built 1898, Newport-reg, Orders & Handford SS, 1-90mm, 24 crew, Mr T Smith, Tyne for Scapa Flow with 2,650t coal. Torpedoed by UC.58 (Kurt Schwartz) at 1120, settled by the head and crew prepared to abandon ship, one boat destroyed, the other too damaged to use, sank at 1132, 3 1/2m NE of Peterhead, N of Aberdeen (L – 3 1/2m ENE of Peterhead Signal Station; un – in 57.32N, 01.44W; wi - in 57.33N, 01.41W), ship’s papers went down with her, at no time was the submarine or torpedo sighted; Master and crew stayed on board except one man who went into the sea. He was picked up by an armed trawler, another patrol vessel went alongside and rescued the rest of the crew, all landed at Peterhead (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

MURRAY, destroyer - BELGIUM COAST OPERATIONS, 24 April 1916, North Sea

MUSKETEER, destroyer, 6 January 1916, Atlantic N of Scotland - Repeat M-class, c1,250t, believed Cromarty-based 11th DF Grand Fleet, taking part in rescue operations. Considerably damaged by fittings along the side of King Edward VII . See also KING EDWARD VII (D/gf)

MUSQUASH (RCN), armed patrol vessel – see HALIFAX HARBOUR EXPLOSION, 6 December 1917

MYNGS, destroyer – see BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits

MYOSOTIS [01], fleet sweeping sloop, 9 September 1917, English Channel - torpedoed and damaged by UC.71 (Reinhold Saltzwedel) between Portland and Isle of Wight; three crew killed (dk/un)

MYOSOTIS [02], fleet sweeping sloop, 1918, location not known - Arabis-class, 1,250t. Mined, stern blown off, location not known, probably northern British waters; no lives lost. Dry-docked and rebuilt (Cn/D/dk/sc)


N

NAIRANA, seaplane carrier – see GLORY, battleship, 7 March 1918, Russian Intervention

NAIRN, Admiralty chartered collier, 27 August 1917, Central Mediterranean - 3,627grt, built 1904, Park SS Co, Glasgow, armed, Malta for Port Said with coal. (te/un - 28th; un – or late on 27th) - Torpedoed by Austrian U.XIV (Georg Ritter von Trapp), sank 125 miles N by W1/4W of Ben Ghazi/Benghazi, Libya (L/te - in 34.05N, 19.16E; un – in 34.05N, 19.20E) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

NARVAL, hired trawler, 26 November 1916, North Sea - 211grt, built 1910, Ostend, Belgium-reg O141, H P Aspeslagh, hired 3/16 as minesweeper, 112pdr, Admiralty No.3268, Skipper James Robinson RNR, believed Harwich-based, completed refit at Grimsby on night of 25th, on passage to Harwich. Disappeared between Grimsby and Harwich, originally believed foundered with no survivors (He – at the time thought lost in minefield laid by UC.4 on 24 November), later confirmed as sunk by German destroyer during raid on Lowestoft; no lives lost, crew taken prisoner. Narval's lifeboat picked up by trawler Atlanta II in 52.30N 01.52E (H/Lr/C/D/ch/dk/sc; ADM.1/8474/278)

NARWHAL, destroyer – see FARNBOROUGH, Q-ship, 17 February 1917, Atlantic W of Ireland

NEATH CASTLE, hired trawler, 14 August 1916, Orkneys - 225grt, built 1913, Swansea-reg S6, Castle Steam Trawlers, hired 1916 (D - 5/15), 13pdr or 12pdr, Admiralty No.1763, Skipper J Rust. Serving as patrol vessel. Sunk in collision with Dutch steamship Rijndam, 12,527 tons (wi - in 59N, 02.30W; He - to NE of Start Point, Sanday Island, Orkney); one rating jumped overboard after the collision and was drowned (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/256)

NEIL SMITH, Admiralty trawler – see DUNDEE, armed boarding steamer, 3 September 1917, Atlantic off SW England

NELSON (G. & E.), Q-ship, 15 August 1917, North Sea - Admiralty hired smacks Nelson, also Ethel and Millie operating as Q-ships, sunk in action with U.63 (Karsten von Heydebreck), leading to the award of a posthumous VC to Nelson's skipper in particularly poignant circumstances: G. & E., aka Bird, Extirpator, Foam Crest, I’ll Try, Ledger No.929, Nelson, S.3 (H - listed as Nelson), operating as Nelson, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, fishing smack, c61grt, built 1905, Lowestoft-reg LT649, taken up 8/8-9/15 and again 22/1/16, probably only armed with 1-3pdr at this time, auxiliary engined by 8/17, Skipper T Crisp RNR, on patrol, fishing on Jim Howe Bank with trawl shot. (dx - 14th) - Submarine sighted at 1445, 3 or 4 miles away, opened fire and although Nelson was hopelessly outranged, she replied. Started to receive hits and take in water, seventh shell went through the skipper's left side, mortally wounding him, second hand Tom Crisp, his son, took over command. Nelson continued firing until nearly out of ammunition, crew abandoned ship, tried to lift the skipper into the boat but his only response was "Tom, I'm done, throw me overboard". They left him on board, Nelson was shelled until she sank off Mablethorpe, Lincs; only the skipper was lost, Ethel & Millie beckoned the survivors on board but they continued rowing west, next day sighted minesweeper Dryad and other sweepers, but were not seen, then on the Friday made fast to the Jim Howe Bank buoy and in the afternoon finally rescued by Dryad. Skipper Thomas Crisp RNR was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross, Second Hand Thomas Crisp the DSM (H/Mn/Cn/D/He*/dk/dx/qs/sk/un/vc; ADM.137/3110);

ETHEL & MILLIE, aka Boy Alfred, Ledger No.929, S.3, possibly Ethel and Emily, special service/submarine decoy/Q-ship, fishing smack, 58grt, built 1908, Lowestoft-reg LT200, taken up 1/2/17, 1-6pdr, 7 crew, Skipper William “Johnsey” Manning. (dx - 14th) - After Nelson was sunk, UC.63 turned its attention on Ethel & Millie which was soon hit and stopped, probably sunk by bomb; 1 officer, 6 ratings lost, according to the younger Thomas Crisp, the crew were picked up by the submarine, and last seen lined up on the foredeck. No survivors were found, only a pigeon message picked up saying she was being attacked by a U-boat. It is suggested they were drowned when the U-boat submerged (H/Mn/Cn/D/He*/bm/dk/dx/qs/sk/un/vc; ADM.137/3110)

NEPTUNE, dreadnought – see AUSTRALIA, battlecruiser, 22 April 1916, North Sea

NESSUS, destroyer – see KING EDWARD VII, predreadnought, 6 January 1916, Atlantic N of Scotland

NEW COMET, hired trawler, 20 January 1917, North Sea - 177grt, built 1910, Granton-reg GN75, W Johnston, hired 5/15 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.1496, Skipper Dawson RNR, believed Harwich-based. Sweeping mines discovered off Orfordness. Mined at 1530, laid by UC.4 (Georg Reimarus), sank rapidly off Orford Ness, Suffolk (He - 52.07.30N, 01.48.40E); 9 ratings lost (He – 2 survivors) (+L/Lr/C/D/he/dk/sc/un; ADM.137/351)

NEW ZEALAND TRANSPORT, Admiralty chartered collier, 14 June 1917, Aegean Sea - 4,481grt, built 1913, West Hartlepool-reg, Empire Transport, armed, Port Talbot for Mudros with coal. Torpedoed by UC.23 (Johannes Kirchner), sank 8 miles SE from Serpho Pulo island, off SE Greece (L - about 11 miles ENE of Mikro Light, Seriphos island); three crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

NEW ZEALAND, battlecruiser – see AUSTRALIA, battlecruiser, 22 April 1916, North Sea

NEWBRIDGE (2), hired trawler, 19 November 1917, English Channel - 228grt, built 1906, Fleetwood-reg FD55, Tettenhall Steam Fishing, hired 5/15 as minesweeper, 13pdr but see note, Admiralty No.963, Skipper Henry George Joyce Chapple RNR. In collision SS Macons, sank off Prawle Point, Devon; no lives lost. Wreck stands up to 25ft high in 180ft of water “with a 7.5in antisubmarine howitzer and a 6pdr still fitted” (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/fd/wi; ADM.137/579)

NIMROD, flotilla leader – see GERMAN RAID ON LOWESTOFT AND YARMOUTH, 25 April 1916, North Sea

NIOBE (RCN), cruiser - see HALIFAX HARBOUR EXPLOSION, 6 December 1917

NINA, hired drifter, 2 August 1917, English Channel - 83grt, built 1904, Peterhead-reg PD497, Heask, Mitchell, Martin & Reid, hired 1/15 (D - April 1915) as patrol drifter, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.994. Skipper George Stewart RNR. On patrol off Prawle Point, Devon. Uncontrollable fire broke out around 2230, depth charge exploded after five minutes and ship abandoned. Two more explosions blew off her stern and she sank at 0054 (wi - in 50.10N, 03.43W; other sources - probably U-boat-laid mine; un - not listed); 3 ratings lost, 1 DOW (H/L/C/D/dk/pd/un/wi; ADM.131/73, ADM.137/487)

NOBLE, destroyer, 4 August 1916, North Sea - Repeat M-class, 25/11/15, 3-4in/1-2pdr/4-21in tt, believed 12th DF Grand Fleet. Collided with and sank drifter Ethelbald 94grt, 7-8 miles east of Kinnaird Head (wi - in 57.43N, 01.46W), drifter lost 5 men. Note: "Wreck Index" attributes the loss of Ethelbald to submarine G.9, which was not completed until 8/16 (H/D/gr/wi)

NODZU, hired trawler, 1 January 1919, Bristol Channel - Chief Skipper James Kilby RNR. Assisting U.S. steamer Lake Wiston which had run aground near Nash Point in poor weather. Nodzu also went aground, could not be refloated and abandoned as a wreck on the 3rd; no lives lost. Later salved, resold for commercial use. (D/He/ms; ADM.1/8496/190)

NORHILDA, Admiralty chartered collier, 21 August 1917, North Sea - 1,175grt, built 1910, C Tennant & Sons, Bristol-reg (un – J Cory & Sons, Bristol), 1-13pdr, 23 crew, Mr J Murphy, Harwich for Tyne in ballast. Torpedoed by UC.17 (Ulrich Pilzecker) just abreast bridge at 1615, started sinking by the stern, went down at 1620, 5 miles SE of Scarborough Castle, Yorkshire (te/un - in 54.15N, 00.10W; 5 miles SE of Scarborough, in 54.16.21N, 00.17.10W); 2nd Engineer missing believed killed in the engine-room, survivors boarded port lifeboat, lowered away but capsized before getting clear, stayed afloat in the sea for about 30min before being rescued by SS Mergerison No.2, transferred to a patrol vessel and landed at Scarborough (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

NORSE, hired trawler – see VITOL, Admiralty-owned RFA blue-ensign oiler, 7 March 1918, Irish Sea

NORTH STAR, destroyer – see BOTHA, flotilla leader, 21 March 1918, Dover Straits

NORTHFIELD, Admiralty chartered collier, 3 March 1918, Atlantic off SW England - 2,099grt, built 1901, Keep SS & Lighterage Co (Harry Keep), London-reg, 1-90mm, 27 crew, Glasgow for Devonport with 3,000t coal. Torpedoed by U.60 (Franz Grunert) probably amidships, sank immediately 25 miles SW of Lundy Is, off Devon (wi - 11 miles WNW of Knap Head, Morwenstow, Cornwall, in 50.55.15N, 04.45.30W, also quotes 15 miles SW and 25 miles SW of Lundy); 15 lives lost including master and all officers, survivors escaped in only lifeboat, picked up by London-reg SS Corvus, landed at Swansea (H/L/Lr/dk/te/un/wi)

NORTHUMBRIA, hired trawler, 3 March 1917, North Sea - 211grt, built 1906, Grimsby-reg GY169, East Anglia Steam Fishing, hired 9/14 as minesweeper (wi - armed patrol sweeper), 112pdr, Admiralty No.623, Skipper A Young. Heading for patrol position. Mined at 1840, laid by UC.29 (Ernst Rosenow) earlier that day, sank quickly near May Is, Firth of Forth (He – about 1 mile N of; wi - 1 1/2m NE of Fife Ness, wreck found in 56.17.31N, 02.32.24W); 5 ratings lost (He – lost five men, nine survivors; wi - 1 officer, 8 ratings killed by the explosion) (H/L/Lr/Mn/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3222)

NORTHVILLE, Admiralty chartered collier, 17 February 1918, English Channel - 2,472grt, built 1897, The Lowland SS Co (J Crass & Co), South Shields-reg, 1-12pdr, 26 crew, Mr J Sim, sailing Newport for Dieppe with 3,400t coal. Torpedoed by UB.33 (Fritz Gregor) starboard-side aft at 1020, sank in 8min, about 3 1/2m SE by E of Berry Head, Devon (te/un - in 50.23N, 03.24W; wi - in 50.24.25N, 03.24.33W); crew picked up by tug Dencode, landed at Brixham (H/L/Lr/te/un/wi)

NUCERIA Admiralty chartered collier, 2 October 1917, Atlantic off NW Morocco - 4,702grt, built 1914, International Line SS Co, Whitby, armed, Barry for Italy with coal. Torpedoed by U.39 (Walter Forstman), sank 120 miles W1/2N of Cape Spartel, Morocco in 35.27N, 8.25W; two crew lost (H/L/Lr/te/un)

NYMPHE, destroyer, 9 July 1917, English Channel - internal explosion near Portsmouth; three crew killed, one DOW (dk)


O

OAKLEY, minesweeper, possibly September 1917, North Sea - early Hunt-class, 750t, probably Granton-based 2nd or 3rd Minesweeping Flotilla. After August 1917 - Lost stern in collision with seaplane carrier Pegasus 3,300t in Firth of Forth. Note: Pegasus commissioned 28/8/17, based at Rosyth with Grand Fleet; no apparent Oakley casualties in this period (D/Cn/dk/gr)

OBERON, destroyer – see LIGHTFOOT, flotilla leader, March 1917, North Sea

OCEAN’S GIFT II, hired motor drifter, 30 August 1917, North Sea - 50grt, built 1901, Fraserburgh-reg FR863, hired probably as harbour tender or coastal service craft, 1-6pdr, Admiralty No.3015, local tender at Great Yarmouth, Skipper Clement Minister RNR. On patrol NE of Haisborough light with group of drifters. Caught fire at 2200 and burnt out, foundered in The Wash off King's Lynn (wi - in 52.58N, 00.20E); 1 officer lost, trawler Kingfisher picked up survivors (H/D/He/dk/wi; ADM.137/528)

OCEAN SCOUT I, hired trawler, 21 December 1917, Atlantic off W Ireland - 200grt, built 1915, Aberdeen-reg A362, Aberdeen Fish Supply Association, hired 7/15, 16pdr AA, Admiralty No.1555. Operating as a patrol vessel. In collision with armed trawler Lord Heneage at 0350, sank in 40 fathoms off Inisheer Light, off Co Clare (He - in53.00.30N, 09.42.00W); no lives lost (H/Lr/D/He/dk; ADM.137/534)

OCEAN STAR, hired drifter, 26 September 1917, English Channel - 92grt, built 1907, Banff-reg BF960, hired 1/15 (D - 12/14) as patrol boat, 1-3pdr, Admiralty No.785, Portsmouth-based, Skipper James Mitchell RNR. On patrol near Nab light vessel, off Isle of White, disappeared night of 26th/27th, presumed mined (He – believed drifting mine; L - mined off Nab LV; un – mined, believed laid by UC.50 (Rudolf Seuffer) on 25 July 1917 off Nab LV; wi - thought mined, but may have been torpedoed, in 50.40N, 00.55W); 1 officer, 9 ratings lost. Destroyer Spiteful found a boat belonging to her 6 1/2 miles SE of Culver Cliff (H/L/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/596)

OFFA II, hired trawler – see ROBERT SMITH, hired trawler, 21 July 1917, Atlantic of NW Scotland

OILFIELD, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 16 March 1918, Atlantic off N Scotland - 4,000grt, built 1896, Newcastle-reg, Hunting SS, armed, Grangemouth/Methil for New York in ballast. Torpedoed by U.90 (Walter Remy), 15 miles NW of Cape Wrath (L/te/un - in 58.45N, 05.26W), beached near Stornoway, refloated but total loss; three crew lost (un – no lives lost) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

OKEMENT, Admiralty chartered collier, 17 February 1917, Central Mediterranean – 4,349grt, built 1915, Sunderland-reg, Westoll Line, armed, Barry for Malta with coal, general cargo. Escorted by trawler Hawk and two other trawlers from Malta to take her through the Cerigotto Channel. Okemont was torpedoed at 1650 by U.64 (Robert Moraht). She settled until Hawk was hit at 1825, then sank 140 miles SE by S of Malta; 11 crew lost including master (H/L/Lr/te/un)

OLIVINE, hired trawler, 1 April 1916, North Sea - During attack on English east coast, German Navy airship L.15 (Production No. LZ.48) was damaged by land-based AA fire - the first such success, landed in the Thames Estuary near Knock Deep and surrendered to Olivine (dx)

ONSLAUGHT, destroyer - IRON DUKE, dreadnought, 18 August 1916, North Sea

ONSLOW, destroyer, 11 March 1918, English Channel - Repeat M-class, c1,250t, convoy escort. Attacked by UB.17 off Portland, torpedo passed under keel, Onslow ran up wake of torpedo and dropped depth-charges, claimed sinking. Note: this claim does not appear to be accepted any longer (Cn/D/ge/ub/un)

OOLA, Admiralty chartered collier, 26 October 1916, Barents Sea - 2,494grt, built 1891, Limerick SS, Newcastle for Alexandrovsk (Polyarny)/Archangel with coal. Captured by U.56 (Hermann Lorenz), sunk by bombs 22 miles NE by N of North Cape (L/te - in 70.30N, 26.24E, latitude should probably read 71.30N) (H/L/Lr/te/un)

ORACLE, destroyer, 12 August 1917, North Sea - Admiralty M-class, 1,025t, Grand Fleet flotillas, U.44 signalled for an escort through German minefields, message intercepted and decoded, warning sent to 3rd LCS on a routine sweep off S Norwegian coast including screening destroyer Oracle. U.44 spotted at 0600, shortly rammed and reportedly cut right through after which a depth charge was dropped, sank 12 miles W of Stavanger (dx/un - in 58.51N, 04.20E) (Cn/D/dx/ub/un)

ORCADES, hired trawler - see ALBERTA, hired trawler, 14 April 1916, North Sea

ORESTES, destroyer – see PRIVET, Q-ship, 12 March 1917, English Channel

OROTAVA, armed merchant cruiser, 21 January 1916, North Atlantic- 5,980grt, built 1889, hired 19/11/14, 10th CS, on patrol in continuing winter gales. Wheelhouse and bridge fittings smashed by heavy sea, forced to run before the wind using hand-steering gear (Mn/D/bi)

ORPHESIA, hired trawler, 22 July 1917, Eastern Mediterranean - 273grt, built 1907, Fleetwood-reg FD119, Staretta Steam Fishing, hired 1915 (D - 12/14) as minesweeper, 1-6pdr, Pendant No.956, Lieutenant Harry Hunter Bell RNR. Sweeping near the wreck of Thistleban, four miles N of No 1 beacon, Alexandria, Egypt. Struck the submerged wreck, and subsequently foundered off Alexandria; no lives lost (H/Lr/C/D/He/dk/fd; ADM.137/3686)

ORTHOS, hired trawler, 9 April 1917, North Sea - 218grt, built 1913, Aberdeen-reg A591, National Steam Fishing, hired 8/14 as minesweeper, Admiralty No.282, Skipper Tom Leaning RNR. Sailing with group from Lowestoft, and preparing to sweep. Mined at 0710 under bows, laid by UC.14 (Ulrich Pilzecker) the day before, sank off Lowestoft, Suffolk (He – in 52.23N, 01.52E.; 1 rating lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un; ADM.137/3231)

ORVIETO, armed merchant cruiser, 4 June 1917, North Atlantic area - 12,130grt, built 1909, ex-auxiliary minelayer, taken up 26/5/16 as AMC, 10th CS. Attacked by U-boat and narrowly missed by torpedo(es) (Mn/D)

OSMANIEH, fleet messenger, 23 June 1917, Mediterranean - cargo ship, hired 12/5/16, armed. U-boat attack, two torpedoes missed (H/Lr/C/D)

OTHONNA, hired trawler, 20 April 1917, North Sea - 180grt, built 1899, Milford-reg M24, Southern Steam Trawling (un – Rainbow Steam Fishing Co, Milford), hired 1/15 as minesweeper (wi - armed patrol vessel), 112pdr/1-6pdr AA, Admiralty No.940, Skipper Alexander McLeod RNR. Sweeping with five other trawlers near May Island, several mines brought to surface to be sunk by gunfire, one exploding near Othonna. She hit an unseen mine, laid by UC.41 (Kurt Bernis), foundered quickly off Fife Ness, Fife (He – 4 miles NE of May Island; wi - in 56.15N, 02.30W); 9 ratings lost (H/L/Lr/C/D/He/dk/un/wi; ADM.137/3223)

OUR ALLIES, hired drifter – see GOWAN LEA, hired drifter, 22 December 1916, Adriatic Sea


P

P.57, patrol boat, 18 November 1917, North Sea - P-type utility destroyer resembling large submarine, 613t, 1-4in/1-2pdr/2-14in tt, probably serving with Nore Local Defence Flotilla, otherwise Portsmouth Escort Force. P.57 sighted a surfaced U-boat ESE of Flamborough Head, approached at full speed and rammed just forward of the conning tower before dropping depth charges. UC.47 was sunk (dx - in 54.01N, 00.22E) (Cn/D/dx/ub/un)

PALMLEAF, Admiralty chartered red-ensign oiler, 4 February 1917, Atlantic off SW Ireland - (exOliphant), Royal Fleet Auxiliary, Leaf-class, 5,489grt/12,300t, launched 15/8/16, purchased 1916, London-reg, under management of Lane & MacAndrew, armed, Pendant No.Y7.152, Master F Daniel, Devonport for Port Arthur in ballast. Escorted to 12 W by two armed trawlers. Torpedoed port side forward at 1650 (possibly should read 0450 – see later times) by U.54 (von Bothmer), settling at 0510, boats launched and ship abandoned, sank at around 0640, 230 miles W of Fastnet (He – approximately 50N,15W; te - in 51.00N, 15.00W); master and chief engineer tak